Things That Matter

Venezuela Is Rising Up Against The Maduro Government Today And Here’s What We Know

After years of unrest and a spiraling economic crisis, Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is facing the strongest show of opposition. Acting-President Juan Guaidó has called for the people of Venezuela to take to the streets and fight for Venezuela’s democracy to be restored. Here’s what has happened today.

The morning started with acting President Juan Guaidó calling for the people of Venezuela to take to the streets in a final push to restore “Venezuela’s national sovereignty.”

Guaidó took to Periscope this morning to rally the Venezuelan people and the military to join in a coup d’etat to take back Venezuela. Specifically, Guiadó called on the protesters to take to the streets in a non-violent fight against Nicolás Maduro and the regime that has devastated the country.

“Today, brave soldier, brave patriots, brave men loyal to the constitution have heard our call,” Guaidó says in the video. “We have finally met on the streets of Venezuela. Operation liberty, the Help and Freedom Committees, I invite them to immediately cover the streets of Venezuela. The first of May has started today. The definitive end of the usurpation starts today.”

One of the first things Guaidó did was to instruct the Venezuelan military to release Leopoldo Lopez from his house arrest.

Credit: @JaredGenser / Twitter

Leopoldo Lopez was the opposition leader when the Venezuelan opposition first started to push back in 2015 and 2016. His visibility and vocal opposition against Maduro made him a target in 2017. He was arrested and harassed multiple times by the Maduro government and his imprisonment at a military prison led to an international backlash against Maduro as Leopoldo’s health declined while detained.

“I have been released by the military under the orders of the constitution and President Guaidó,” Lopez tweeted for the first time since 2017. “I am at the Carlota Base. Everyone mobilize. It’a time to conquer for freedom. Strength and faith.”

Protesters have answered Guaidó’s call to take to the streets by the thousands.

The coup d’etat, being supported by members of the Venezuelan military, is pushing against pro-Maduro forces as clashes break out across the city of Caracas. Pro-Maduro forces are using deadly force against protesters as they try to end the protests and restore order.

Pro-Maduro colectivos have turned their guns and tanks against Guaidó supporters.

Colectivos were not always the armed aggressors of the Venezuelan government that we know today. It is only recently that the colectivos have participated in violence and fear-based terrorism of the Venezuelan people.

“The colectivos first appeared in the early years of the Chávez administration to inform people of social policies,” Margarita López Maya, a Venezuelan historian El Rosario University, told USA Today. “The idea was to organize people and inform them of what the government was doing.”

Some of the military member under Maduro’s rule have defected to support the Venezuelan people.

“There are generals, there are lieutenant colonels, there are majors, there are colonels — it’s a reflection of the country,” Guaidó told the press about the military joining in the fight against Maduro.

Venezuelans around the world are raising their voices for their home country today.

Venezuelans have been fighting for their country for years. The world is watching on today as they make another push to save their country from the hands of the man they no longer want in power.

This story is still developing. Check back with mitú for updates.

READ: Venezuelan Blackout Claims 21 Lives, Opposition Leaders Blame Maduro Regime

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Women In Mexico Marched For International Women’s Day And Things Got Violent

Things That Matter

Women In Mexico Marched For International Women’s Day And Things Got Violent

March 8 is International Women’s Day. It is a day to celebrate women but in Mexico it is a protest against the rampant femicide gripping the country. Women marched against the femicide this year and things turned violent when police clashed with protesters.

March 8 has a different meaning in Mexico.

Women in Mexico took to the streets to protest the rampant femicides that are devastating the country. According to the New York Times, femicides in Mexico have been increasing in recent years. There was a 10 percent increase from 2018 to 2019 with a total of 1,006 incidents of reported femicide.

In 2017, there were seven femicides a day and by 2019 the number had jumped to 10.

“Women are demanding a shift of paradigm and nothing less,” Estefanía Vela, executive director of Intersecta, told the New York Times. “These are not only hashtags. These are students protesting at the universities, and mothers demanding justice for their daughters.”

People on social media are amplifying the cause by sharing what is happening.

President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has made it a part of his presidency to downplay the extent of the crisis. At times, AMLO has gone on record dismissing claims of widespread femicide in Mexico.

“I’m going to give you another fact, which doesn’t mean that violence against women doesn’t exist, because I don’t want you all to misinterpret me,” AMLO said during a daily morning presser in May. “Ninety percent of those calls that serve as your base are false, it’s proven.”

Women are not allowing for the narrative of false reports to persist and are standing up to highlight the crisis. People are criticizing AMLO and his administration for seemingly turning a blind eye to the deadly crisis.

This year’s protest had more anger after the death of Ingrid Escamilla.

Escamilla was murdered in February 2020 by her domestic partner. Her body was mutilated by the attacker in a violent way. The press ran the photos of her body on the front page and sparked anger around the world. After being murdered, her body was displayed for the public to see and people are tired of women being treated so poorly.

“He was supposed to represent a change and it turns out that he is not,” Xóchitl Rodríguez, a member of Feminasty, told the New York Times. “The fact that you wake up in the morning and your president cannot reassure you on what specific actions he is taking to deal with the issue, is outrageous.”

READ: Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

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In A Post-Covid World, Here Is Where You All Said You Want To Travel

Culture

In A Post-Covid World, Here Is Where You All Said You Want To Travel

Covid put a stop to our travel plans for 2020. After almost a year in lockdown, we have had time to plan fantasy trips and explore the world. We asked you where you wanted to visit and here are some of the places you all can’t wait to see.

Argentina

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Argentina offers something for everyone. As on of the southernmost countries in the world, Argentina offers natural sights that will make nature lovers swoon. Into architecture? Cities like Mendoza offers a look at the art-deco style that will make you feel like you are back in time. Don’t forget to try to make a trip down to Ushuaia, the End of the World for a spectacular view.

Cuba

Cuba is a tricky one but a beautiful place to see. The country is filled with old buildings and cars that make it feel like a time capsule. Now, the island is old because they are oppressed and don’t have much. But you can always find ways to make sure that you help people of the island instead of giving the money to government approved businesses.

Costa Rica

This is about as wild and wondrous as it gets. Costa Rica will give everyone a chance to really be one with nature. The Central American country is a rainforest oasis with nature everywhere you look. The country prides itself on how development is not encroaching on nature and has even outlawed zoos and aquariums.

Honduras

Honduras is an underestimated place to visit. The food and people are warm and inviting. There has been some unrest in the country in recent years and a series of hurricanes has devastated the population. Tourism is a great way to bring money into a place the needs it. Just don’t take advantage of them while you are there.

Mexico

Mexico is a country filled with wonders new and old. You can experience the ruins of some of the oldest civilizations and bask in the modernity of Mexico City. The food is as diverse and vibrant as the people with delicious moles in Oaxaca and experimental fusions in Mexico City. Valle de Guadalupe is home to some farm to table restaurants and exquisite wineries. It truly is a journey of the sense if you take time to see the country.

Colombia

Colombia is one of South America’s gems. After years of internal conflict, the nation is growing and quickly becoming a destination. Bogotá and Medellín are great but make it a point to visit Cali. The city is one of the place everyone should visit if they make their way to Colombia.

READ: Mexico Announces 11 New Pueblos Mágicos And It’s The Post-COVID Travel Lust We All Need Right Now

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