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Here’s What Venezuelan Actress Daniela Alvarado Has To Say About The Economic Crisis In Her Country

danialvarado323 / Instagram

Daniela Alvarado, the actress who was the face of Jane in the original Venezuelan telenovela of “Juana la virgen,” which inspired “Jane the Virgin,” has opened up about how the ongoing crisis in her home county has affected her day-to-day life.

Daniela Alvarado is best known for her role as Juana in “Juana la Virgen.”

The Venezuelan telenovela would later inspired The CW’s “Jane the Virgin.” Even the Villanueva family in “Jane the Virgin” is a Venezuelan family.

Despite some of her social media posts, Alvarado wants her fans to know that the crisis is impacting the famous as well.

In an exclusive interview with Venezuelan news site Version Final, the 36-year-old actress provides details on how the ongoing crisis in Venezuela has ‘denigrated the status of the Venezuelan artist.’

The actress has used her social media presence to help friends find medicine during the economic turmoil in Venezuela.

Alvarado told Version Final that she has had difficulty finding pills for her parents’ hypertension, as well as the medicine for treating her own hyperinsulinemia, and has even had to re-sell a bag of arepa corn meal on the black market to make ends meet.

She doesn’t hold back from showing her fans her low points because of the crisis.

“There have been times in my life, in my career, where I haven’t had anything to eat,” she told Version Final. “I have been working. I remember a particular point where I was in such a bad economic place that I had to sell a lot of things in order to put food on the table.”

In an attempt to make a living during this time, Alvardo has turned to social media promotions.

A quick skim through her Instagram page shows she has been doing social media marketing for products including meal delivery services and beauty products.

When asked about the Venezuelan opposition, the actress was frank in her comments.

“I think it’s filth. You have to be conscious of your actions, with what you say and what you do. Principles should not be compromised,” Alvardo told the news outlet. “I don’t care who is governing. What I care about is that this crap moves forward. [I want] to work in peace.”

When it comes to her own life, Alvarado is indeed trying to work and move forward in her own career, touring recently with her one-woman play “Hecha en Venezuela.”

She has no current plans to emigrate to another country and plans to stick it out in Venezuela as long as she can.

“I’ll leave the day I want to leave, not because someone is kicking me out of my country,” Alvarado told Version Final.

Read her full interview with Version Final here.


READ: People Are Furious At Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro Eating An Empanada Live On TV While Citizens Starve

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One Of The Major Artists In The Chicano Art Movement Has Died At 75

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One Of The Major Artists In The Chicano Art Movement Has Died At 75

m4martinez / raysantisteban / Instagram

On May 29, René Yañez, a man instrumental in shaping and cultivating the Chicano art scene in the Bay Area, died from prostate and bone cancer at age 75. Yañez, an artist, curator and social justice activist was the co-founder of Galería De La Raza and the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts. Yañez has been curating the beloved SOMArts’ annual Dia de Los Muertos group art show in the Mission District for years. However, he was one of the first curators that presented arts shows centered around Day of the Dead in the U.S. back in the early ’70s. Yañez was also Director of Special Projects and Building Manager at SOMArts.

Rio Yañez, René’s son, posted the news of his death on Facebook and wrote that he had been preparing for this exact moment for the past four years.

Hi Everyone, my Dad passed away this morning about an hour ago. He was surrounded by people who loved him and having…

Posted by Rio Yañez on Tuesday, May 29, 2018

“Rene is my Father, my creative partner, and my best friend,” Rio writes. “I miss him so much already. These last two weeks have been the hardest of my life but I’ve had a partner and extended family that have taken such great care me. I may be grieving but please know I that feel incredibly loved and supported right now.”

René had been working until the very end. In March, he presented his retrospective exhibition titled “Into The Fade.”

René put on his retrospective all the while receiving weekly infusions of chemotherapy or blood, according to Mission Local.

“The artist, who has lived in the Mission District for most of his adult life, said that when he told his doctor earlier this year that he was thinking of doing a show in the fall, ‘the doctor told me, ‘You’d better do it sooner.’ So I’m doing it sooner.’ He laughed at the thought that he might beat his prognosis. ‘I’m playing this out.'”

His last show included one of his most known works titled “The Great Tortilla Conspiracy” which featured the face of Emma Gonzalez.

The concept behind “The Great Tortilla Conspiracy” is that it brings “the gospel of tortilla art” to the masses.

People took to social media to remember René and all that he contributed to the art scene, social justice movements and to their lives.

According to an interview in Mission Local, René was born in Tijuana and migrated with his family to San Diego.

René’s family has requested that SOMArts establish a memorial fund in his honor. All proceeds from this fund will be dedicated entirely to continuing René’s legacy of hospitality, beauty and creativity in SOMArts’ garden. Help us honor René by contributing to the memorial fund. We were truly blessed to work with such an incredible mentor, artist and friend for so many years. SOMArts will host a community memorial for René in the coming weeks.

Rene’s coworker at the Somarts Cultural Center said: “You bless all you know and meet by sharing your talents and humor.”

I had the privilege of working with Rene Yanez for over 16 years at SomArts Cultural Center. I miss sharing an office…

Posted by Mary Molly Mullaney on Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Rene was also a military veteran having served in a medical unit during the Vietnam War.

René is remembered as “El Padrino de la Mison.”

Grammy nominated emcee, DJ, actor, Wonway said that Rene inspired him.

“Que viva René Yáñez!”

Alicia Cruz, has worked with Rene for several years for the Day of the Dead exhibition and said that he took a chance on her and her altar vision.

 “He nurtured my evolution as an artist.”

CREDIT: Instagram/@mexichicastyle

“He was a gentle soul, very personable, lots of humor, he was a guide,” Cruz described Rene.

She says he also inspired her activism.

“He was my social media,” Cruz said. “He would tell me when there would be a march and say ‘you should join us.'”

Adding that “He’s the glue, he’s the heart of the SOMarts.”

An altar has been placed in front of the SOMArts Cultural Center in his honor.

CREDIT: Courtesy of Alicia Cruz

René was once asked what advice he would give to young artist, which he responded with: “Do what you like and be passionate about it, because you can’t be mediocre and be successful at it. Try to be as diverse in your skills, from computers, theater, performance, set design — all different aspects — because if you can’t get one thing, something else will come out.”


READ: This New Exhibit Shows The Incredible Evolution Of Lowrider Culture

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