credit: @meridaaldia / @eltubazo / Instagram

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The Streets Of Caracas And Other Major Cities In Venezuela Are Empty Because Of A Nationwide Strike

Venezuela is not moving today due to a nationwide strike against President Nicolás Maduro’s plan to rewrite the country’s constitution. On Sunday, July 16, millions of Venezuelans voted on a nonbinding, symbolic measure denouncing the creation of the National Constituent Assembly. The assembly would be created by the Maduro government and be tasked with rewriting the constitution. The last time this assembly was created was in 1999, when Hugo Chavez became president of Venezuela. Chavez  rewrote the constitution and took power away from his political opponents.

Here’s what Venezuela looks and sounds like today during the strike.

Major cities around Venezuela are silent and still today as Venezuelans participate in a an anti-Maduro strike.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro has argued that the assembly is an attempt to bring peace to the South American country, which has been devastated by months of sustained protest and clashes between protesters and law enforcement.

From the freeways of Caracas, Venezuela…

#Caracas también activa con el #ParoCívico #Venezuela #20Jul

A post shared by Noticias de Venezuela (@noticiasdevenezuela.0) on

These are the same freeways we have seen packed with protesters since April.

To the surface streets of Merida, some areas of Venezuela are looking like ghost towns.

Centro de la ciudad de #Mérida #ParoNacional

A post shared by Meridaaldia (@meridaaldia) on

Maduro has spoken about the strike and has said that it is failing. He say all the strike is seeking to do is negatively impact Venezuela’s economy, according to ABC News.

One state-run media company is sharing photos and videos of some Venezuelans going to work in support of Maduro.

“Workers of @SarenEnLinea working for a productive and independent Venezuela,” reads the tweet by @VTVcanal8.

However, photos coming from other Venezuelans are painting a different picture, like this photo of Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas…

CREDIT: Courtesy of Miguelangel Hernandez

The Organization of American States Secretary-General Luis Almagro has released a third report about the violence and protests taking place in Venezuela. In the report, Almargo expresses concern over the escalation that could take place if the Maduro government does not change course and listen to the citizens demanding change.

“The fear that is on everyone’s mind, but we are too afraid to speak out loud, is our fear that this will escalate into a bloodbath,” Almargo wrote in his report. “The one thing that is clear is that this regime has no regard for the human rights of its people, or the lives of its citizens. They have already made the decision that 75 lives is a price they are willing to pay to hold onto power. How many more can we, the international community tolerate?”

Or this photo comparing train usage from yesterday to today in Caracas.

El metro de Caracas, ayer y hoy ! Cual paro ? Jajajajaja #Gación !!! #venezuela #paronacional

A post shared by Miguel Angel Barrera (@miguelabarrera) on

Venezuelans set up makeshift road blocks in the early morning hours to disrupt as much as possible during the strike.

Barricada en Macaracuay por paro Nacional. #Venezuela #Protesta #ParoNacional #20Jul #fueramaduro

A post shared by publicidad en redes (@laluchaesgratis2.0) on

“We put up the barricade early, around 5 a.m.The objective is that no one goes to work, that people stay home for 24 hours,” Edmond Fakrhi, a Caracas resident told The Washington Post. “We want liberty. We want democracy. We want everyone to have access to food.”

Some of the roadblocks used fire as a way to deter people from going to work for 24 hours.

The strike has even reached some of the state-run gas stations.

Around 100 people have died protesting the Maduro government since April. More than 7 million Venezuelans worldwide recently cast symbolic, nonbinding votes to denounce the rewriting of the country’s constitution. Several countries and world leaders have come forward urging Maduro to stop to vote on July 30 for the assembly. As July continues, all eyes will be on Venezuela and Maduro.


READ: Politicians Around The World Are Praising The Results Of The Symbolic Vote By Venezuelans

 

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