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Mexico Isn’t Paying For A Wall But The Trump Administration Is Paying Mexico To Stop Central American Migrants

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Since President Trump took office he’s promised that Mexico would pay for a border wall, a demand the country has refused. For now, in the Trump administration’s strategy to stop illegal immigration, the United States instead plans to pay Mexico. The administration is moving through with plans to pay $20 million to Mexico to deport migrants and stop them from reaching the U.S. This comes after Democrats blocked the measure in Congress and the Mexican government dismissed the proposal.

Congress was told late on Oct. 1 that the funds had already been transferred over the weekend.

The administration intends to take $20 million in foreign assistance funds and use it to help Mexico pay plane and bus fares to deport as many as 17,000 people who are in that country illegally. The administration hopes the money will help increase deportations of Central Americans, many of whom go through Mexico to get to the U.S. Any unauthorized immigrant in Mexico who is a known or suspected terrorist will also be deported under the program.

Thousands of Central Americans travel through Mexico to come to the U.S. and either cross the border illegally or apply for asylum from their home countries. Fifty-seven thousand Central Americans were deported from Mexico in the first half of 2018, according to the Associated Press.

The Mexican government has yet to agree to terms with the U.S. on the measure.

Mexico’s president Enrique Peña Nieto rejected the proposal in September. His successor Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a populist, hasn’t made a formal announcement about his position on the program. Many believe that López Obrador is not likely to accept the proposal, despite having a friendly relationship with Trump.

The State Department notified Congress first in September that the funds were going to be transferred to the Department of Homeland Security.

President Trump and Lopez Obrador spoke over the phone recently about the development in Central America.

The three North American countries are meeting in Washington with delegations from Central American countries about recent developments, according to ABC News.

The program aims to help relieve immigration flows through Mexico to the U.S.

The Trump administration has worked tirelessly to curb immigration, legal and illegal. They have changed rules as to who qualifies for asylum and implemented a “zero tolerance” policy designed to separate families as a deterrent.

Immigrant advocacy groups have called the deportation aid for Mexico a misguided use of money. Instead, advocates are calling on officials to handle the issues that are forcing people to flee their homes and countries for a better, safer life.

“We shouldn’t be paying another country to do our dirty work; we should actually be fixing our immigration system and helping these countries get back on solid footing,” said Ali Noorani, the executive director of the National Immigration Forum told the NY Times. “It smacks of desperation.


READ: Trump Administration Transferred Nearly $10 Million From FEMA To ICE For Detention Programs

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Officials Are Investigating Accusations That The Los Angeles Sheriff's Deputies Engaged In Racial Profiling

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Officials Are Investigating Accusations That The Los Angeles Sheriff’s Deputies Engaged In Racial Profiling

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An investigation has been launched into whether Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies engaged in racial profiling against thousands of Latino drivers while on the 5 Freeway. According to a report by the LA Times, 69 percent of drivers who were stopped between 2012 and 2017 as part of a police operation were of Latino descent. County Supervisor Hilda Solis requested the inspector general and Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission begin a investigative review of the sheriff’s Domestic Highway Enforcement team.

Two-thirds of cars searched by the LA County sheriff’s Domestic Highway Enforcement Team were of Latinos, a rate far higher than other racial groups.

The report shows that sheriff’s deputies searched the cars of more than 3,500 drivers. A majority of the driver were Latino and didn’t have any illegal items. Deputies conducted searches of Latinos’ vehicles during two-thirds of the stops, while other drivers had their cars searched less than half of the time The statistics are alarming and have caught the attention of various watchdog groups who are calling for an investigation into the report.

The L.A. County Sheriff’s Department denies that officers were engaged in racial profiling and praised the amount of drugs seized by officers during their operations. According to the report, officers confiscated “more than a ton of methamphetamine, 2 tons of marijuana, 600 pounds of cocaine, millions of dollars in suspected drug money.”

“We do not racially profile. We make stops based on behaviors and vehicle code violations, not ethnicity,” Assistant Sheriff Eddie Rivero said in a statement released after the LA Times article was published.

County Supervisor Hilda Solis says the report is “concerning.

“It’s deeply concerning that racial profiling could have been used on Latino drivers,” Solis said in a statement to the Associated Press. Solis says she wants the inspector general and a civilian oversight commission to investigate the enforcement team, which is made up of four white male deputies.

Sheriff Jim McDonnell said he would work with investigators to fix any concerns.

“As someone who has dedicated my career to protecting the civil rights of all people, I am personally concerned about any allegation of racial and ethnic profiling and take very seriously questions about race and police procedures,” McDonnell told the AP.

The traffic stops were conducted along a 40-mile stretch of Interstate-5 that officials say was a major pipeline for cartels to move narcotics.

CREDIT: Credit: LA Times

The enforcement team, which was stationed on Interstate 5, was formed in response to a spike in drug overdoses in the Santa Clarita area. The area of the highway where officers were stationed spans roughly 40 miles of freeway from just south of Santa Clarita to the border of Kern County. Deputies say that section of Interstate 5 is a huge source for cartels to move drugs along the West Coast and return to Mexico.

The investigative reports’ findings come as no surprise to many that know the racial history of the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department.

The L.A. County Sheriff’s Department has had a history of problems, from issues around racial profiling to brutality in local jails. That’s why it came as no surprise to Peter Bibring, senior staff attorney and director of police practices at the ACLU of Southern California. Bibring told L.A. Taco that the department’s problems with racial profiling are well-documented and sees this is an abuse in power.

“The department has a long history of these problems,” Bibring said. “I think one of the concerns of a program like this that seems to involve behavior by deputies that had been flagged by courts and still continues raises concerns that the department has a culture that tolerates this behavior.”


READ: A New Study Finds Latinos Believe In The American Dream But That It Has Become Too Hard To Achieve

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