Things That Matter

Uno-dos-tres, 13 Latin Rhythms That Make Us Bust A Move!

Most stereotypes about Latin American culture tend to be hurtful. We are not lazy, promiscuous or a bunch of free-loaders (quite the contrary: we are hard-working, committed and believe in a fair go for everyone). However, there is a stereotype that is kinda true and certainly amazing: most of us love to hit the dance floor!

Music is essential to Latin American culture and is one of our main cultural exports (just look at Ben Stiller on the above image!). The origin of some of our rhythms are quite interesting. Read the juicy details below and surprise your primos in the next family party. 

1. Salsa

Credit: 8.jpg. Digital image. Latino life.


Like many music genres salsa is a hybrid. Salsa was popularized by Cubans and Puerto Ricans in 1960s New York, who fused Cuban son with popular rhythms like swing. The rest is history. The sinuous moves and catchy songs (based, like soul, on repetition) spread like sunshine in the whole American continent.

You gotta listen to: Rubén Blades (but of course)

Credit: ruben-blades-salsa-768×432. Digital image. Sounds and colours.


We hate to be a bit cliché here, but no one better than the Panamanian salsa master to be the ambassador of this music. His love for culture and music is eternal. 

2. Mambo

Credit: West Side Story. Seven Arts Productions.


Its origin dates to the early twentieth century, when son and danzón Cuban masters started to speed up the tempo and delve into African music territory. Where danzón ends and mambo begins is unclear…. 

You gotta listen to: Dámaso Pérez Prado

Credit: p04xg66j. Digital image. BBC.


1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 maaaaambo. The Cuban from Matanzas was the original Maestro del mambo and revolutionized this music genre by incorporating big band style ensembles. He made his career in Mexico, where he was a common feature in films and popular culture.

3. Lambada

Credit: Giphy. Anonymous.


This is the infamous dance that made thousands of abuelitas cross themselves in the 80s and 90s and proclaim “Jesucristo Salvador!”. This dance has an African origin and was popularized in Brazil. It is a bothered and sweaty joining of bodies. The word means “strong slap” in Portuguese.

You gotta listen to: Aurino Quirino Gonçalves a.k.a Pinduca

Credit: 0306va03pind1. Digital image. O POVO Online.


He is the father of lambada and his quick rhythms popularized the genre even if other groups mixed it with…

4. Bachata

Credit: Tenor. Anonymous.


This type of music originated in the Dominican Republic, a Caribbean nation where Spanish, indigenous and African rhythms collide. Bachata is slow and suave, a mix of son and traditional boleros, romantic songs generally accompanied by guitars. The dance is slow and up close. Sabor! 

You gotta listen to: Prince Royce

Bachata has become a source of identity for Hispanos in the East Coast, where the rhythm is hugely popular. This boy from The Bronx (represent!) is a proud representative of mainstream Latino culture. 

5. Banda

Credit: Rudo y cursi. Warner.


Originally for norther Mexico, this music makes us think of deserts, cowboy hats and boots. However, its origins are quite interesting and actually European. If you listen closely, you will realize that it is very similar to polka! Yes, the music imported by German migrants who made this region of Mexico lindo y querido their home. 

You gotta listen to: Intocable

Credit: IntocableHighway-1500×1000. Digital image. Grupo Intocable.


The Mexican-American band is simply amazing: their lyrics are melancholic and their music is pure kitschy delight. Best of all, you can share it with your amá, tías and abuelas in the upcoming family posadas.

6. Ranchera

Credit: Tenor. @j_m_19


Originally Mexican of course. Ranchera music emerged from the ashes of the Mexican Revolution and was the cornerstone of the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema, where figures such as Pedro Infante and Jorge Negrete became idols. The music touches on the universal themes of loss, rural life and love. Ay, ay, ay. 

You gotta listen to: Chavela Vargas

Credit: Giphy. @remezcla


A Costa Rican dynamo who became a symbol of queerness in a male dominated world. La Vargas could outdrink the most macho mariachis and legend has it that she bedded some Hollywood starlets. She was a true legend. She continued performing well into her old age. 

7. Corridos

Credit: Giphy. @CorridosMX


During and after the Mexican revolution, corrido singers composed troubadour-style songs in which they told the stories of robbers and soldiers. In recent times, corrido singers have used the drug cartels and dealers as their main source of inspiration, which has led some states like Chihuahua to forbid narcocorridos. This is a huge industry in the United States as well. 

You gotta listen to: Los Tigres del Norte

Credit: Tenor. @AntonioLopezGC


This legendary band has been involved in controversies due to the way they seem to glorify narco culture. They have sung about lost love among smugglers, criminal masterminds and Mexican identity. Their accordion and catchy lyrics will such have you dancing. Una camioneta gris, con placas de California

8. Merengue

Credit: vicini-merengue-identity-and-magic. Digital image. folkdancesdr.com


This rhythm is synonym of the Dominican Republic. When it became popular in the 19th century newspapers described it as a threat to high moral standards. Later dictator Victor Trujillo made it the national music and dance of the country. It is happy, fast and catchy as hell. 

You gotta listen to: Juan Luis Guerra

Credit: Tenor. Anonymous.


This amazing musician is simply the ambassador of merengue. His “Bilirrubina” spread all throughout the continent like a happy virus and he has remained at the top for three decades. Sing with me: qusiera ser un pez

9. Cumbia

Credit: Cumbia-2WEB. Digital image. Making Music Magazine.


Its origin is Colombian of course. Like most genres, it is a mix product of processes of colonization. It was originally a courtship dance among indigenous groups, but when it came face to face with African and European rhythms  and instruments such as drums, magic happened.

You gotta listen to: Celso Piña, El maestro del acordeón

Credit: celso-pina-oakland-2. Digital Image. Latin Bay Area.


Colombian cumbia has become popular the world over, and Monterrey, in northern México, is one of the epicenters of cumbia culture. Celso Piña is a master accordion player who has toured the world making gringos, europeans and la raza dance.

10. Tango

Credit: Giphy. @sonymusiccolombia


Tango is the epitome of South American sensuality. Cultivated mainly in the Argentinian capital of Buenos Aires and the Uruguayan Montevideo, this music’s popularity is credited to the great Carlos Gardel, who was in fact born in Tolouse, France. Story goes that the accordions that were used in churches in Germany found their way to bars and brothels in Argentina, where musicians experimented with their high pitch and sustained melancholic notes. 

You gotta listen to: Astor Piazolla

Credit: homenaje-a-astor-piazzolla-en-el-cck-03-695×477. Digital image. Saddler Wells’ Blog.


Sure, Carlos Gardel is the go to classic, but Piazzolla wrote sexy classics in his own right with a much more contemporary sensibility. Find him on Spotify, make yourself some mate tea and relax. 

11. Reggaeton

Credit: Giphy. @am85


Vilified by some due to its often aggressive misogynist lyrics, reggaeton comes out of Puerto Rico. It is a mix of Latin music, hip hop and genres such as reggae (that’s where its name comes from, actually). This rhythm has become perhaps the most popular in the world, even outside Latin America. 

You gotta listen to: Calle 13

The duo from Puerto Rico is as sabroso as it gets, but can also be politically assertive. Even though they know how to set the dance floor on fire they can also sing about migrant rights, US interventionism and boricua identity.

12. Samba

Credit: Giphy. Anonymous


Images of the Rio Carnival in Brazil come to mind. Thousands of people moving their hips to the sound of drums. Samba originates from the forced and illegal migration of African individuals who were sold as slaves. The music originates from current-day Angola and Congo. 

You gotta listen to: Carmen Miranda

Credit: Giphy. @boomunderground

Oldie but goodie Carmen Miranda is perhaps not the best samba singer and dancer, but she had a key role in spreading this rhythm beyond Brazil by migrating to Broadway and Hollywood and becoming one of the first latino icons of US popular culture. 

13. Bossa Nova

Credit: 790248030623. Digital image. Putumayo Music.


This very slow and sensual rhythm became popular in Brazil in the 1960s. It uses instruments such as acoustic guitar, electrical guitar and piano not generally associated with Latin music. Its perfect for slow dancing and relaxing. 

You gotta listen to: Caetano Veloso

Credit: Tenor. Anonymous.


The Brazilian classic singer has a voice that sounds like a smooth piña colada on a steamy Río afternoon. Just so sensual and lush. 

Tens Of Thousands Of Puerto Ricans, Including Bad Bunny And Ricky Martin, Call For The Resignation Of Gov. Rosselló At Massive Old San Juan Protest

Things That Matter

Tens Of Thousands Of Puerto Ricans, Including Bad Bunny And Ricky Martin, Call For The Resignation Of Gov. Rosselló At Massive Old San Juan Protest

badbunnypr / Instagram

On Wednesday, tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans shouted “Ricky, renuncia!” as they marched through the streets of Old San Juan in its fifth and largest protest calling for the resignation of Gov. Ricardo Rosselló.

Early in the demonstration, Puerto Rican stars like Bad Bunny, Residente, Ricky Martin, PJ Sin Suela and more gathered in front of the Capitolio, where they held large Puerto Rican flags and signs that read “los enterraron sin saber que somos semillas,” and encouraged a roaring crowd to not abandon their fight. As the artists stood atop a white truck in the midst of protestors, activist Tito Kayak, who famously placed the Puerto Rican flag on the Statue of Liberty’s crown in 2000 in protest of the US’ presence in Vieques, scaled the flagpole in an attempt to remove the American flag. The crowd erupted in cheers, chanting “Tito, Tito,” showing that the protest in the US territory extends beyond the people’s grievances with their local government.

Bad Bunny took to the streets of Puerto Rico with his fellow Americans to protest a governor they want out of office.

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

Protests erupted on Saturday after Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism published 889 pages of a private Telegram chat between the governor and some of his officials. The messages included profanity-laced homophobic, transphobic and misogynistic comments about female politicians, celebrities and protestors and hard-hearted jokes about the victims of Hurricane María. For the people of Puerto Rico, who were just rocked by a money-laundering scheme by its education and health leaders and endured repeated neglect and abuse by both its local and federal governments following the devastating hurricane, the chats symbolized the final straw.

As darkness fell on Wednesday, some of the celebrities spoke out.

Credit: badbunnypr / Instagram

“This government has to begin respecting the people. We can’t stop protesting,” Residente, born René Pérez Joglar, said. Later, Puerto Rican singer iLe, Residente’s younger sister, sang the original, revolutionary version of La Borinqueña, with demonstrators, holding their flags and fists in the air, joining her in song, belting, “Vámonos, borinqueños, vámonos ya, que nos espera ansiosa, ansiosa la libertad.”

By la Fortaleza, the governor’s mansion, tension sparked in the mostly-peaceful protest in the late hours of the night. Demonstrators, some throwing bottles of water and fireworks, busted through a barricade. Police fired tear gas, dispersing the massive crowd and angering local residents who allege officers discharged on empty streets where elders and youth in their homes struggled to breathe as a result of the smoke.

Other areas of the old city looked like a war zone, with officers chasing and shooting rubber bullets at protestors, trash bags blazing on cobblestone streets and the windows of graffiti-laden establishments shattering.

According to authorities, at least seven protesters were arrested during the protests and four police officers were injured. There is also an investigation into an officer who forcefully grabbed a demonstrator alleging she was trying to jump over a barrier, though footage of the incident later revealed she was not.

Motorcycles also thundered through the city early Thursday morning, as a protest caravan of thousands of motorcyclists, led by El Rey Charlie and reggaetoneros Brytiago, Noriel, and Ñengo Flow, traveled from Trujilo Alto to Old San Juan in a journey that captivated the island.

People on the island are relentless in demanding that their voices be heard.

Credit: elreycharlie / Instagram

“We won’t stop. The oppression is over. The repression is over. Ricky, resign or we will take you out because the people put you there and we are ready to remove you. We want you out,” El Rey Charlie, a beloved motorist on the island, told Puerto Rican network WAPA-TV.

Outside of San Juan, groups around the island also took to the streets. In the States, the diaspora and their allies similarly demonstrated in Orlando, New York, Miami, Boston, Cleveland, San Antonio and more, while international actions occurred in the Dominican Republic and Spain as well.

Despite the massive uprising, Rosselló has contended that he would not resign. The governor, who previously apologized for his “improper act,” said that he believes he could win over the people of Puerto Rico.

“I recognize the challenge that I have before me because of the recent controversies, but I firmly believe that it is possible to restore confidence and that we will be able, after this painful process, to achieve reconciliation,” he said in Spanish. “I have the commitment, stronger than ever, to carry out the public policy.”

The governor is desperately trying to get people to forget about the unacceptable and offensive conversations he was involved.

Credit: @ricardorossello / Twitter

As Rosselló insists he would not step down, the president of Puerto Rico’s House of Representatives, Carlos Méndez Núñez, has already appointed three lawyers to investigate the contents of the leaked chats to determine whether an impeachment process can begin.

Additionally, Puerto Rico’s non-voting delegate to Congress Rep. Jenniffer González-Colón, who is a member of the governor’s pro-statehood New Progressive Party, has called for a meeting among her PNP colleagues.

There is no shortage of corruption that people want to get rid of right now.

Credit: @Jenniffer2012 / Twitter

“There must be an urgent meeting of the directory of @pnp_pr to discuss everything that is happening,” González-Colón said on Twitter.

President Donald Trump also took the opportunity to lambast the embattled governor as well as criticize the island, including the mayor of San Juan Carmen Yulín Cruz, for corruption.

President Trump weighed in on the matter and used it to attack an island still recovering from the hurricane and the mayor of San Juan.

Credit: @realDonaldTrump / Twitter

He continued: “This is more than twice the amount given to Texas & Florida combined. I know the people of Puerto Rico well, and they are great. But much of their leadership is corrupt, & robbing the U.S. Government blind!”

But for many protesters, the marches aren’t just about sending a message of indignation to Rosselló, but rather to all corrupt politicians on the archipelago as well as the colonial federal government. Protest posters illustrate Rosselló with Trump’s hair to compare the two abhorred leaders, while vandalism on concrete walls screams for the resignation of the governor, the fiscal control board and the island’s colonial ties to the U.S.

Today and tomorrow, the people say, the uprising continues, with demonstrations planned across Puerto Rico and its diaspora in the US and worldwide.

Read: Here’s What You Need To Know About The Puerto Rico Uprising

Chisme Says Javier Bardem Is Close To Landing The Role Of King Triton And People Have Some Thoughts

Entertainment

Chisme Says Javier Bardem Is Close To Landing The Role Of King Triton And People Have Some Thoughts

Vittorio Zunino Celotto / Staff

Disney just recently announced that Halle Bailey would be portraying Ariel in the live-action remake of ‘The Little Mermaid’ and finally we are starting to see better presentation of POC on the big screen.

The reaction to her casting was huge and, of course, came with it’s share of racist trolls.

But Disney is giving us another reason to celebrate ‘The Little Mermaid’ with word that Javier Bardem is in talks to start as Ariel’s father, King Triton.

Javier Bardem could possibly play King Triton in the live-action ‘Little Mermaid.’

Credit: @RottenTomatoes / Twitter

Big news from Disney — Spanish actor Javier Bardem is reportedly in talks to join the cast of Disney’s upcoming live-action remake of the ‘Little Mermaid.’

And the best part? He’s up for the role of Ariel’s dad and the ruler of Atlantica, the mighty King Triton. If the reports are true, Javier will be joining a star-studded cast for the highly-anticipated flick.

Although Javier is in talks to play King Triton, other actors have publicly said they’d want to be considered in the Rob Marshall-directed movie. Brooklyn Nine-Nine actor Terry Crews took to his social media and posted a selfie of himself as the underwater ruler.  “Ariel’s Dad!!!!,” he wrote alongside the image.

Reactions on Twitter have been mixed to the news but a lot of people love the idea of Javier Bardem as King Triton.

And you can count us among that group. He’s a very talented actor, who, in fact, has won an academy award. So we have faith that he’ll be an amazing King Triton.

And this user had a very beautiful way of looking at the possible casting.

Credit: @DEADLINE / Twitter

The sea is definitely a colorful place. Plus, also, mermaids aren’t real so Disney can cast whoever they want in which ever role they want.

While this person was excited for the possibility of something like Cinderella.

Credit: @DEALINE / Twitter

And we have to say that we agree. Brandy in Cinderella was everything and we would love to see Halle Bailey bring that same sort of energy to this role as Ariel – and we have faith that she will.

Though it looked like many on Twitter weren’t having any of it.

Credit: @IGN / Twitter

It looked like some were confused by the whole family tree while others just wanted the so called classic ‘Little Mermaid’ (read: white) that they grew up with and already know.

But more than one Twitter user easily shut down the haters.

Credit: @Spartan901 / Twitter

That’s right people. Mermaids aren’t real. They could cast this however they want to cast it.

While many others were totally stanning for Terry Crews.

Credit: @people / Twitter

Count us in on this as well. Who doesn’t love funny man Terry Crews?! Apparently, he also really wants the role. He even tweeted out a photo of the film with the caption #ArielsDad.

Whoever plays King Triton will be joining a star-studded cast.

A few weeks ago, the studio announced that R&B singer (and Beyoncé’s protégé) Halle Bailey would take on the role of Ariel, while Melissa McCarthy would play Ariel’s nemesis Ursula. Other castings include 12-year-old actor Jacob Tremblay as Ariel’s best friend Flounder and Crazy Rich Asians star Awkwafina playing Scuttle, the pair’s other friend that gives them access to objects from the human world. Harry Styles is also reportedly in talks to play Ariel’s love interest Prince Eric.

READ: Racist Twitter Is Coming For The Black Actress Recently Tapped To Be ‘The Little Mermaid’ And She Ain’t Batting An Eye

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