things that matter

Here’s The Latest On The Beef Between Univision And Charter Spectrum

Early Wednesday morning, customers of Charter Spectrum cable found that they no longer had access to any Univision networks. Networks including Univision, Unimás, Galavisión, Univision Deportes and El Rey seemed to have just vanished.



The blackout, which lasted 36 hours and affected 2.5 million Latino homes throughout the nation, was not a mistake. It happened because of money. Specifically, how much money Charter Spectrum should be paying Univision in carriage fees.



The blackout ended due to a ruling by New York Superior Court Justice Salianna Scarpulla. A Charter Spectrum spokesperson said in a statement, “Today, the Supreme Court for the state of New York granted Charter a temporary restraining order, meaning that Univision programming will be returned to our customers.”



Univision released their own statement, which reads:


“A judge who was temporarily assigned to our case today said that she planned to issue an order that Univision’s networks and stations had to be restored on Charter Spectrum for 7 days. This order only lasts until February 9, when the judge permanently assigned to the litigation is back in court. For the 7-day period that it is receiving Univision’s services, Charter Spectrum will be required to post a bond covering the actual market value of Univision’s programming, rather than the inadequate rates that Charter Spectrum has been paying. Univision remains ready and willing to meet at any time with Charter Spectrum to engage in comprehensive, good-faith negotiations for the long-term carriage of our stations and networks. To date, Charter Spectrum has steadfastly refused to engage in such negotiations.”



The carriage fee dispute between the two companies has been going on for quite some time. Six months ago, Univision filed a suit against Charter Spectrum for breach of contract over carrier fees. Univision explained in a statement:



“Charter insists that the contract Univision had with Time Warner Cable is controlling, rather than its own contract with Univision. Charter bases this argument on the preposterous theory that as a result of the merger, Time Warner Cable, rather than Charter, is managing all these cable systems. But everyone knows that is not true: the longstanding CEO and the executive team of Charter, as well as its pre-existing board of directors, now manage and control all of the cable systems.”



So even though Charter Spectrum acquired Time Warner Cable, they wanted to keep the deal that TWC had negotiated with Univision because it’s a better deal, but Univision was like, “not so fast, we didn’t make that deal with you.”



All this behind-the-scenes bickering is what led to the blackout. Univision demanded that Charter Spectrum stop broadcasting their networks, and that’s why on February 1, there was a whole mess of confused customers staring at a blue screen.



Hopefully, Univision and Charter Spectrum will find a way to work together because Univision is the country’s largest Spanish-language media company, which means many Spanish speakers depend on it as a news source. Father Richard Estrada of Church of the Epiphany in Lincoln Heights told the Los Angeles Times, “People are afraid and nervous of what [President] Trump will do next. A lack of access to news and information will only make things worse. It makes you wonder, ‘What’s next? What will they take away next?’”



Click here to find out more about the beef between Univision and Charter Spectrum.

Queer Latina Tiffany Cabán Makes History In Queens With New York District Attorney Primary Win

Things That Matter

Queer Latina Tiffany Cabán Makes History In Queens With New York District Attorney Primary Win

Instagram / @cabanforqueens

Tiffany Cabán, a queer Latina public defender, declared victory Tuesday night in a tight Democratic primary race for Queens district attorney.

“When we started this thing they said I was too young. They said I didn’t look like a district attorney,” Cabán, 31, said at her election-night party at a nightclub in Woodside, Queens. “They said we could not win, but we did, it y’all.”

With 99 percent of precincts reporting, Cabán has currently received 39.6 percent of the vote, while the establishment’s favorite Melinda Katz garnered 38.3 percent. There are still 3,400 absentee ballots that need to be counted, which the Board of Elections said won’t be completed until next Wednesday.

Katz, who was endorsed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and former Queens Democratic Party chief Joe Crowley, who was ousted by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) around this time last year, has refused to concede. She has also already made calls for a recount.

This has not stopped Cabán and her supporters from celebrating a victory.

“We’ve already won without knowing what the final tabulation is,” Maurice Mitchell, the national director of the Working Families Party, which backed Cabán, said. “We’ve already won. We’ve beaten the machine.”

Cabán, a democratic socialist, ran on a platform of “people-powered justice,” which included ending cash bail, not prosecuting subway turnstile jumping, prosecuting the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, closing Rikers Island and decriminalizing sex work.

“I am a 31-year-old, queer Latina public defender whose parents grew up in the Woodside Housing projects,” she said during her Tuesday night speech. “And I decided to run. I ran because for too long, too many communities in Queens hadn’t had a fair shot in our criminal-justice system.”

The Puerto Rican public defender received endorsements from progressive leaders like Ocasio-Cortez, Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). Most recently, the New York Times also backed the candidate.

“She is of Puerto Rican descent and is the first in her family to graduate from college. She would bring a perspective suited to one of the world’s most diverse communities, one where elected officials have rarely reflected that reality,” the publication said in its endorsement of Cabán.

Cabán’s likely six-person primary win would have her succeed the deceased Queens District Attorney Richard Brown and shift the borough’s, city’s and country’s tough-on-crime, prosecutorial approach in the DAs office.

Read: In New York, Queer Latina Tiffany Cabán Wants To Bring ‘Genuine Justice’ To The Queens District Attorney’s Office

Wayfair Employees Holding Walkout To Protest Company’s Bed Sales To A Migrant Detention Facility

Things That Matter

Wayfair Employees Holding Walkout To Protest Company’s Bed Sales To A Migrant Detention Facility

Mario Tama / Getty Images

On Wednesday, employees for the online home goods retailer Wayfair are planning a walkout in protest of the company selling furniture to migrant detention centers, the Boston Globe reports.

After learning last week that BCFS, which operates migrant facilities for the Department of Health and Human Services, ordered $200,000 worth of bedroom fittings for a new migrant camp in Carrizo Springs, Texas, which would hold 1,600 unaccompanied children, more than 500 employees sent a letter to senior management asking them to not carry out the sale. 

The letter, sent on Friday, also asked the company to create a code of ethics that “empowers Wayfair and its employees to act in accordance with our core values,” according to CNN, which secured a copy of the letter.

“The United States government and its contractors are responsible for the detention and mistreatment of hundreds of thousands of migrants seeking asylum in our country — we want that to end,” the employees said in the letter. “We also want to be sure that Wayfair has no part in enabling, supporting, or profiting from this practice.”

Wayfair, however, did not budge to its employees’ requests, responding that it will continue to do business with BCFS.

“As a retailer, it is standard practice to fulfill orders for all customers and we believe it is our business to sell to any customer who is acting within the laws of the countries within which we operate,” the Wayfair’s leadership team said in the letter. “This does not indicate support for the opinions or actions of the groups or individuals who purchase from us.”

Continuing to push back against the company’s decision, employees have planned a walkout scheduled for Wednesday afternoon. If the company will make a profit off of working with BCFS, they are asking that it be donated to RAICES, a nonprofit reuniting families at the US-Mexico border. According to a Twitter account organizing the walkout, that amount totals $86,000.

The walkout has garnered massive attention on Twitter, where it has also received the hashtag  #wayfairwalkout. Among those supporting the employees is Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), who said “this is what solidarity looks like.”

“A reminder that everyday people have real power, as long as we’re brave enough to use it,” she continued.

The walkout comes as the Trump administration gains increasing criticism for its treatment of migrant youth, particularly at a Customs and Border Protection facility in Clint, Texas, where 250 migrant children will be moved into a shelter system.

Since news of Wayfair’s business with BCFS, its stock has dropped 5 percent.

Read: Migrants Children Are Getting Sick In Detention Centers But The Trump Administration Doesn’t Want To Give Them Toothbrushes

Paid Promoted Stories