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The Undocumented Parents Of A Very Sick Baby Willingly Let Themselves Be Arrested By Border Patrol To Save His Life

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When Oscar and Irma Sanchez learned that their 2-month-old child needed urgent, life-saving surgery, they hesitated. Not because it was costly, but because they are undocumented. The Sanchez family knew they would have to drive through a border checkpoint to get their child from a Harlingen, Texas hospital to Driscoll Children’s Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, according to NPR. With no other option left to save their child, the Sanchezes, with urging from the hospital staff, made the decision to go to Corpus Christi.

According to a statement from Border Patrol to NPR, a hospital staff member called the Border Patrol and alerted them about a child in need of urgent surgery with undocumented parents that would have to cross a border checkpoint. Soon, Border Patrol agents arrived at the Harlingen hospital and escorted the couple to Driscoll. NPR reports that while waiting for the child to have surgery, the couple was taken to a Border Patrol station to be fingerprinted and booked as part of the detention. The Border Patrol told NPR that they allowed one parent to be with the child while the other was processed. Both parents will face deportation proceedings.

“You feel vulnerable,” Oscar told NPR about how the agents followed he and his wife everywhere they went in the hospital. “We didn’t know if they were going to let us stay with our son or not.”

The Border Patrol praised its agents for helping save a baby’s life.

“CBP was notified by the Harlingen hospital that there was a child with undocumented parents in need of urgent medical care and that the family would have to go through a checkpoint to the Corpus Christi hospital,” Manny Padilla, the chief of the Rio Grande Valley sector of the Border Patrol, told NPR. “To get the child to the care it urgently needed, Border Patrol agents did everything in their power to assist the family, including escorting the ambulance, unimpeded, through the checkpoint.”

You can read the full story from NPR by tapping here.

(H/T: NPR)


READ: After 16 Years Of Working And Always Paying His Taxes With No Criminal Record, This Father Has Been Deported

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After Aaron Hernandez's Brain Was Donated For CTE Research, It Was Found That He Had The Worst Case Of CTE For Someone His Age

Things That Matter

After Aaron Hernandez’s Brain Was Donated For CTE Research, It Was Found That He Had The Worst Case Of CTE For Someone His Age

Getty/ Boston University

Last April, former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez committed suicide in his prison cell. He was serving a life sentence for murder and took his life just days after being acquitted of a separate double murder. After Hernandez’s death, his brain was donated to Boston University to be tested for CTE. Researchers have finally confirmed that Hernandez was indeed suffering from severe chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain condition that may result in memory loss, violent behavior, and depression. It is believed Hall of Famer Junior Seau and former Bears defensive back Dave Duerson, who both committed suicide, suffered from CTE.

According to researchers, for someone his age, Hernandez had the most severe case of CTE they had ever seen.

To illustrate how severe it was, Nathan Fenno of the L.A. Times tweeted out images of what advanced CTE looks like.

Dr. Ann McKee, a Professor of Pathology and Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine and the Director of BU’s CTE Center, released the official statement with the original photos.

Credit: Boston University

Based on characteristic neuropathological findings, Dr. McKee concluded that Mr. Hernandez had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Stage 3 out of 4, (Stage 4 being the most severe). This diagnosis was confirmed by a second VABHS neuropathologist. In addition, Mr. Hernandez had early brain atrophy and large perforations in the septum pellucidum, a central membrane.

This graphic shows the classic features of CTE in the brain of Mr. Hernandez. There is severe deposition of tau protein in the frontal lobes of the brain (top row). The bottom row shows microscopic deposition of tau protein in nerve cells around small blood vessels, a unique feature of CTE.

Dr. McKee and the BU CTE team have extensive experience in the diagnosis of CTE and have contributed landmark publications on traumatic brain injury and CTE in athletes and Veterans. Her research has demonstrated that CTE is associated with aggressiveness, explosiveness, impulsivity, depression, memory loss and other cognitive changes.

We are grateful to the family of Aaron Hernandez for donating his brain to the VA-BU-CLF brain bank, located at the Jamaica Plain campus of the VA Boston Healthcare System.

The BU CTE Center will have no additional comment.

Although it may sound speculative, the findings raise questions about the effect CTE had on Hernandez, who had a history of violent behavior. It’s impossible to know for certain since CTE can only be diagnosed by deep examination of the brain after death. At the very least, the findings will continue to make CTE a hot-button issue among NFL fans, players, and owners.


[H/T] New York Times

READ: Aaron Hernandez’s Secrets Are All Coming To The Light After His Suicide


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