Things That Matter

People Across Twitter Are Left Saying WTF After Trump Says He Admires Former Labor Secretary Alex Acosta Because He’s Hispanic

On Friday it was reported that Trump’s Labor Secretary, Alex Acosta, the only Latino member of his cabinet, would be resigning. The news came as the secretary was under intense scrutiny for having let an alleged sexual predator off easy.

Trump’s press conference was already off to a strange start, even by Trump standards, but it was his comments about Alex Acosta’s heritage that really sent Twitter abuzz.

Trump’s Labor Secretary Alex Acosta is resigning amid criticism of his brokering of a plea deal for alleged sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein in a child sex case.

Credit: @cnnbrk / Twitter

President Trump’s embattled labor secretary, R. Alexander Acosta, announced his resignation on Friday amid continuing questions about his handling of a sex crimes case involving the financier Jeffrey Epstein when Mr. Acosta was a federal prosecutor in Florida.

But it was Trump’s handling of the resignation and press conference that really sent Twitter into overdrive.

President Trump delivered lengthy and rambling remarks to reporters with soon-to-be former Labor Secretary Alex Acosta by his side. Trump announced Acosta is resigning in the wake of nationwide outrage over his gift of a sweetheart deal to accused child rapist and trafficker Jeffrey Epstein.

When Trump announced that Alex Acosta was leaving his administration he added in that the Labor Secretary was Hispanic not once, but twice.

First, he said, “He’s a Hispanic man. He went to Harvard.” And he later added, “He’s Hispanic, which I so admire because maybe it was a little tougher for him and maybe not.”

Now with Acosta out, Trump has zero Hispanics in his cabinet.

Credit: @PhilipRucker / Twitter

Acosta was the first Latino appointee to Trump’s mostly straight, cisgender, white, and male cabinet. The president has since nominated Jovita Carranza to be Small Business Administator, a cabinet level position, but she has not yet been confirmed. Trump has notably appointed very few women and minorities to the federal judiciary or top positions in his administration.

This is not the first time Trump has tokenized people from minority groups. During his 2016 presidential campaign, he singled out a a supporter of color, saying “Look at my African American over here.” He also reportedly suggested that he only wanted short Jewish guys — not black people — to be “counting” his money.

But it was really the Twitter reactions that made this story. Here are some of the best:

One Twitter user pointed out the president had just committed the cardinal sin that so many non-POC committ: the “I’m not a racist because I have a POC friend” excuse but this time on national television.

There are so many good memes, like this one that basically shows our collective reaction to Trump’s words.

Credit: @thegandiman / Twitter

Let’s quickly recap.

Trump went to unusually great lengths to defend and praise Acosta, at one point praising him for his heritage.

“He was a great student at Harvard,” Trump said of his outgoing Labor Secretary. “He’s Hispanic, which I so admire, because maybe it was a little tougher for him – and maybe not. But he did an unbelievable job as the secretary of Labor.”

Many questioned how he could say he admires Hispanics given his treatment of largely Hispanic and Latino migrants seeking asylum in the US.

Credit: @atrupar / Twitter

Seriously, Trump’s rhetoric against people of color, and Latinos in particular, has been nothing short of cruel, mean, and inciting hate.

Then there’s those who offered up a little #tbt.

Because few of us can forget this moment. Trump was still running for president back in 2016 and at a restaurant in New York’s Trump Tower. on Cindo de Mayo. he was interviewed while eating a taco bowl salad and basically used that as proof that he’s not a racist.

At the time he said ” The best taco bowls are made in Trump Tower Grill. I love Hispanics!”

Yes, that’s a direct quote.

Aside from the ridiculous mention of Acosta being Hispanic, many were upset Trump was defending a man who let an alleged sexual predator off easy.

Acosta, a former federal prosecutor, agreed to a sweetheart plea deal in 2008 with billionaire financier and former Trump friend Jeffrey Epstein. Last week, Epstein — who Trump previously called a “terrific guy” — was charged with sex trafficking involving girls as young as 14. In a lengthy press conference this week, Acosta took no responsibility at all for the non-prosecution agreement.

And this meme basically sums up the collective reaction of Latino Twitter.

When will it all finally come to an end…?

READ: In A Seriously Awkward Announcement, Vice President Pence Went To Florida To Launch A ‘Latinos For Trump’ Coalition

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A Federal Court Ruling Could Finally Put Much Needed Stimulus Funds In The Hands Of Native Tribes

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A Federal Court Ruling Could Finally Put Much Needed Stimulus Funds In The Hands Of Native Tribes

Sharon Shischilly / Getty Images

Indigenous communities in the Unites States have often been forgotten or deliberately excluded from federal policy. Many nations have been forced to go it alone and, as Covid-19 ravages Native lands, many tribe members have died.

After more than two centuries of exclusion, amid a global epidemic, Indigenous communities are once again being excluded from the decision-making process in Washington even as Covid-19 devastates their communities.

But while Indigenous peoples haven’t always had success before the courts, there has been real momentum of late. In July, the Supreme Court recognized roughly half of Oklahoma as Indigenous land, in a ruling that will have far-reaching consequences in the state justice system and beyond.

Now, Native Americans are having to fight once again for what they’re owed as the federal government distributes the more than $150 billion in stimulus money. More than a dozen Indigenous organizations warned, starting in early April, that if the Trump administration did not listen to tribal governments, they ran the risk of turning the relief package into a “grave injustice.”

A federal judge has ordered the Trump administration to give Native tribes their withheld stimulus money.

Credit: Sam Wasson / Getty Images

Frustrated and disgusted that it has taken so long for the Treasury Department to distribute federal stimulus funds to Native American tribes, a federal judge ordered Secretary Steve Mnuchin to distribute the money immediately, according to HuffPost. The judge said that tribes should have received their portion of the CARES Act months ago when other Americans received theirs.

The decision from U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta was particularly critical of Mnuchin’s decision to hold back $679 million in funding set aside for tribes while waiting on a decision in another case that will determine whether tribal businesses are eligible for the funding, as The Hill reported.

In his ruling, Mehta said “Continued delay in the face of an exceptional public health crisis is no longer acceptable.”

Over the past three months, the Treasury Department has managed to send out billions of dollars in loans to small businesses, checks to families and aid to corporations. But distributing the $8 billion pot set aside for tribal governments has proved more difficult. As a result, tribes, already critically underfunded and among the nation’s most vulnerable communities, have not received all the money they need to weather the pandemic and begin recovering from the economic toll.

“Congress made a policy judgment that tribal governments are in dire need of emergency relief to aid in their public health efforts and imposed an incredibly short time limit to distribute those dollars,” he wrote in an order released late Monday night. “The 80 days they have waited, when Congress intended receipt of emergency funds in less than half that time, is long enough.”

Some tribes were owed $12 million in federal funding and yet got nothing from the government.

Credit: Mark Ralson / Getty Images

Much of the fault is with the Treasury Department which counted the populations of Native tribes differently that Congress had intended. This meant that some tribes would end up with zero funding while some for-profit tribal companies could end up with millions.

Since some tribes do not have a designated reservation or service area, their population counts were listed as zero and they received only the minimum $100,000 allocation.

“We are not races — we are sovereign nations,” said Chief Ben Barnes of the Shawnee Tribe. He added “How can a tribe have zero people?” noting that more than 3,000 people belong to his tribe. “It was a simple clerical error, but no one at Treasury tried to fix it.”

The oversight was even more egregious, Barnes said, because there is also a census count that, while not completely accurate, would have ensured the tribe got closer to the $12 million it believes it is entitled to based on enrollment numbers.

As the legal wrangling continues, the picture on the ground is disastrous.

The Indian Health Service (IHS) reports there have been nearly 33,000 COVID-19 cases reported to IHS, tribal, and urban Indian health organizations. In May, the outbreak in the Navajo Nation surpassed New York as the highest infection rate in the country—today, its infection rate is double any state. Today, the nation has more cases, in terms of raw numbers, than several states.

And while the funding threats and lack of resources threaten everyone, Indigenous elders—sometimes the only remaining speakers of nearly lost languages—face particular danger.

In recent years, there have been furious efforts to collect Indigenous histories and preserve nearly lost Indigenous languages. COVID-19 threatens to undo much of that work as it cuts through the elderly population.

“COVID-19, like many diseases, renders Indigenous elders—our knowledge-keepers and language holders—particularly susceptible to illness and death,” wrote Gina Starblanket and Dallas Hunt, two Indigenous professors and writers in the Globe and Mail in late March. “This virus not only places us at risk, but the future well-being of coming generations as well

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The Trump Administration Raised Fees For Immigration Cases Including For Refugees

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The Trump Administration Raised Fees For Immigration Cases Including For Refugees

Drew Angerer / Getty Images

In its continuing campaign against immigrants and refugees, the Trump administration has increased the costs of immigration proceedings – in some instances by more than 80%. These new fees could make the cost of seeking asylum protection in the U.S. or becoming a citizen out of reach for tens of thousands of immigrants.

The new fees are seen as little more than an additional tool used by the administration to further limit immigration to the U.S. and make life more difficult for those seeking to call the U.S. homes.

The Trump administration announced major changes to the fees charged for immigration proceedings.

On Friday, the Trump administration announced it would dramatically increase the fees for U.S. immigration services on everything from refugee asylum requests to naturalization services. The new fee structure, released by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), is expected to take effect on October 2.

The new fees are seen as little more than an additional tool used by the administration to further limit immigration to the U.S. and make life more difficult for those seeking to call the U.S. homes. It will also have an outsized impact on business that hire foreign workers.

The agency, which has closed offices and suspended most services during the pandemic, has said it faces a significant revenue shortfall that could trigger furloughs. Earlier this year, the agency requested $1.2 billion in emergency funds from Congress.

The U.S. will now be one of just a few countries that actually charge refugees to file asylum requests.

Credit: Gregory Bull / Getty Images

With the new fee charged to refugees and asylum seekers, the U.S. will become one of just four countries that actually charge for this application. The new fee for asylum is a blatant attack on the most vulnerable among us and is another way for the administration to target and restrict protections for those fleeing their home countries.

The $50 application fee for asylum applications now puts the U.S. in the same ranks as Iran, Fiji, and Australia. The new rule would also raise the cost for an asylum applicant to apply for an employment authorization document (EAD) from the current zero to $490, one of many policy changes to discourage potential asylum applicants. DHS commented, “DHS does not believe that the EAD fee is unduly burdensome for asylum seekers.”

However, one asylum officer who spoke with BuzzFeed News on condition of anonymity said the fee was discouraging.

“The larger problem is that humanitarian applications by their nature should be free,” the officer said. “The idea of charging people who are fleeing — and not helping if they don’t pay up — is disgusting.”

Another asylum officer said it will cost the agency more to collect the fee than $50, “which doesn’t come close to covering the cost of adjudicating an asylum application.”

Other fees – from green card replacements to citizenship applications – will also be going up.

The new fee changes impact several categories of services offered by USCIS that will impact our community. Two of the most common types of visas issued by the agency (L and H-1B visas) will increase by 75% and 21% respectively.

The L visa – which is used for short term work in the U.S. – will increase from $460 to $805. The fee for an H-1B petition (which is used by employers to hire highly-skilled workers) will rise from $460 to $555.

For season workers in the U.S., of which there are hundreds of thousands, their fees will also increase by almost 50%. The current fee for these visas is $460 but the H-2A (season agricultural) will rise to $850 and the H-2B (seasonal non-agricultural) will rise to $715.

USCIS would increase the cost of the application (N-400) to become a U.S. citizen by more than 80%, rising from $640 to $1,160 (for online filings, although a separate $85 biometrics fee would be eliminated). 

The new increased fees come as the agency faces a financial crisis that many say are of its own making.

Many are concerned about the timing of these fee increases because USCIS is in the midst of historic mismanagement, that has face the agency from a substantial surplus to a deficit so severe USCIS has requested a $1.2 billion bailout from Congress.

Rep. Zoe Lofgren, chair of the House Judiciary’s Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship, held a July 29, 2020, oversight hearing that helped explain how the Trump administration caused the financial problems at USCIS through its policy choices on immigration.

“Under the Trump Administration, USCIS has issued a flurry of policies that make its case adjudications more complicated, which reduces the agency’s efficiency and requires more staff to complete fewer cases,” testified Doug Rand, a founder of Boundless Immigration and a senior fellow at the Federation of American Scientists. “There are dozens if not hundreds of such policies.” 

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