Things That Matter

Somebody Needs To Educate The President On Executive Orders Because Apparently He Wants To Use One To Override The Supreme Court

riggedthefilm / Instagram

The drama over the 2020 Census continues to play out.

The Trump administration had wanted to include a controversial citizenship question because in their words they wanted to use the information to better enforce the Voting Rights Act. However, that excuse fell flat with the Supreme Court after documents came to light showing ulterior motives involving suppressing the voice of non-White communities.

The Supreme Court rejected Trump’s request to include the question but that hasn’t stopped him from seeking ways around the court so that he can move forward with the illegal question.

Trump says he’s considering an executive order to put the citizenship question on next year’s census.

Credit: @thehill / Twitter

President Donald Trump said Friday he is “very seriously” considering an executive order to try to force the inclusion of a citizenship question as part of the 2020 Census.

Speaking to reporters as he departed the White House for a weekend in New Jersey, Trump said the idea is among four or five options he’s considering as he pushes the issue.

“It’s one of the ways that we’re thinking about doing it, very seriously,” he said, despite the fact that the government has already begun the process of printing the census questionnaire without that question. 

Trump’s announcement is the latest twist in a never-ending story of his administration’s attempt to include the controversial question.

Credit: @cnnbrk / Twitter

Trump’s administration has faced numerous roadblocks to adding the question, including last week’s Supreme Court ruling that blocked its inclusion, at least temporarily. But Trump has insisted his administration push forward, and suggested Friday officials might be able to add an addendum to the questionnaire with the question after it’s already printed.

Executive orders do not override decisions of the Supreme Court – that would be a dictatorship.

Credit: @KristenClarkeJD / Twitter

An executive order would not, by itself, override court rulings blocking the inclusion of the citizenship question. But such an action from Trump would perhaps give administration lawyers a new basis to try to persuade federal courts that the question could be included.

“Executive orders do not override decisions of the Supreme Court,” Thomas Saenz, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said in a statement Friday. MALDEF is representing plaintiffs in the census lawsuit in Maryland.

Any effort to circumvent the Supreme Court by way of executive order would also likely act as fuel to the fire for the dozens of House Democrats who have advocated for an impeachment inquiry into the president to be initiated.

Many took to Twitter to express their frustration with the President and his possibly illegal plan.

Credit: @marceelias / Twitter

One lawyer pointed out that the US Constitution specifically gives all responsibility regarding the census to Congress – not to the President. So there’s that standing in between Trump and his executive order.

But many pointed out that Trump doesn’t seem to care about those formalities and would probably try anyway.

Credit: @marceelias / Twitter

I mean he’s attempted to enact several other controversial policies via executive order and so far the Supreme Court has largely let him get away with it – until the Census case.

While others suggested that if he straight up defies the Supreme Court, this could be the beginning of the end of the Trump Presidency.

Credit: @thehill / Twitter

House Democrats, Speaker Pelosi, among others, would be hard pressed to find an excuse to not start impeachment proceedings against a President who has defied the highest court in the nation.

READ: Latinos Face Severe Underrepresentation With 2020 Census, Here’s Why That Matters

The Trump Administration Is Making It Harder For Low Income Migrants To Get Green Cards And Citizenship

Things That Matter

The Trump Administration Is Making It Harder For Low Income Migrants To Get Green Cards And Citizenship

leekris / Getty Images

The Trump administration has been guilty of using dangerous rhetoric against immigrants, and Latinos in particular. But in addition to the often times blatantly racist rhetoric, the administration has also taken steps to stem the flow of migrants from Latin American countries.

Until recently, the government was set on stopping undocumented migrants from coming to the US – case in point, Trump’s vanity project of the border wall. The government has also limited the ability of refugees to claim asylum in the US, threatening the safety, security, and literal lives of tens of thousands of people.

However, as of today, the Trump administration is also moving to limit legal immigration to the country by basically making their lives a living hell once they’ve arrived in the US.

On Monday, the administration announced a new rule that would severely limit legal immigrant’s right to public assistance.

The Trump administration released a regulation Monday that could dramatically cut the number of legal immigrants allowed to enter and stay in the US by making it easier to reject green card and visa applications.

Paired with last week’s enforcement raids on food processing plants in Mississippi, Monday’s announcement amounts to a concerted effort by the administration to limit legal immigration and crack down on illegal immigration.

The 837-page rule applies to those seeking to come to or remain in the United States via legal channels and is expected to impact roughly 383,000 people, according to the Department of Homeland Security. 

The new rule is set to begin on October 15 and will impose several new restrictions for recent arrivals and green card holders.

The rule means many green card and visa applicants could be turned down if they have low incomes or little education, and have used benefits such as most forms of Medicaid, food stamps, and housing vouchers, because they’d be deemed more likely to need government assistance in the future.

Under current regulations put in place in 1996, the term “public charge” is defined as someone who is “primarily dependent” on government assistance, meaning it supplies more than half their income. But it only counted cash benefits, such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families or Supplemental Security Income from Social Security.

Officials can take into account an applicant’s financial resources, health, education, skills, family status and age. But few people are rejected on these relatively narrow grounds, experts said.

But according to the Trump administration, none of this is meant to target Latinos – which, of course, few people are believing.

When asked about whether the rule is unfairly targeting low-income immigrants, Cuccinelli said: “We certainly expect people of any income to be able to stand on their own two feet, so if people are not able to be self-sufficient, than this negative factor is going to bear very heavily against them in a decision about whether they’ll be able to become a legal permanent resident. “

On Twitter, this has been the general consensus:

As a defense of the its policies against undocumented migrants and asylum seekers, the Trump administration has often relied on talking points about legal immigration to sound compassionate and welcoming. The administration often says “we are a nation of laws“ and that if They’re followed the US is here to welcome you.

With this new regulation, the administration is proving that’s not true. And people across social media are not having any of it.

While many pointed out that this was flat out discrimination against the poor.

Earlier this year, President Donald Trump also issued a memorandum doubling down on a current law that requires immigrants’ sponsors to take financial responsibility for certain income-based government benefits the immigrant receives. It’s unclear whether enforcing the law would make any substantial difference.

Several immigrant’s rights activists and organizations are already threatening swift legal action.

Monday’s regulation is likely to meet legal challenges, but it could still cause some who fear retribution to alter their daily lives.

About one in seven adults in immigrant families reported that either the person or a family member did not participate in a non-cash safety net program last year because of fear of risking his or her green card status in the future, an Urban Institute study found.

As Trump Moves To Strip TPS From Nearly Everybody, The Administration Is Thinking Of Extending It To Venezuelans

Things That Matter

As Trump Moves To Strip TPS From Nearly Everybody, The Administration Is Thinking Of Extending It To Venezuelans

Rep. Darren Soto / Soto.House.Gov

The headline gives it away: it’s legit, Trump and his band of merry men are considering taking steps to enact a TPS, or Temporary Protected Status, specifically for Venezuelans in the US. But what does this mean, exactly? Don’t worry, because we’ve saved you the hard work of doing research on the topic – read on to find out all about it.

Why the White House is considering a TPS for Venezuelans.

Twitter / @immprobono

Instituting a TPS for the Venezuelan population in the US would essentially protect them from being deported. While at this stage the details are sketchy, it seems that the plan would be to not only allow Venezuelans to continue living in the US, but also have work permits, too. And yes, it would also mean that these same Venezuelans, with their newfound legal status, wouldn’t have to watch out for persecution from ICE officers anymore.

The primary reason the White House is seeking to provide legal protections for Venezuelans is due to the current political environment in Venezuela.

Instagram / @elconsejero.ve

While it’s a complicated situation, the short story is that Venezuela’s current President, Nicolás Maduro, has been accused of running fraudulent elections by his opposition. This has escalated into military struggles – which, alongside power cuts, and food and medicine shortages, has resulted in an estimated four million Venezuelans leaving the country. As a result, Venezuelan migrants flocked to the US, since it’s one of the closest stable countries to Venezuela. However, that doesn’t mean that all Venezuelan migrants have got current paperwork for them to live and work in the US. Establishing a TPS for these Venezuelans would ensure that they’re rightfully recognized as asylum seekers, and give them the legal status to remain and work in the US.

Why it’s hella weird that the White House is considering a TPS for Venezuelans.

Instagram / @starbucki77

Don’t get us wrong – it’s great that, for once, the Trump administration is considering ways to protect people who are legitimately seeking asylum. But, it’s also weird as heck that it is considering ways of instituting a TPS. Remember, this is the same administration that gave us the infamous Muslim ban, overcrowded detention centers in El Paso, and also jeopardized the DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, program. Trump and friends don’t really have a great record when it comes to embracing immigration.

The other thing to consider is that the TPS they’re proposing would only be available for asylum seekers coming from Venezuela.

Instagram / @chebt82

People from other Latin American countries aren’t in luck, this time around. Some have speculated that the reason for this is because while Trump and his team consider Venezuelans to be refugees fleeing danger, they see Hispanics from the rest of Latin America as job seekers, looking to leech off of America’s success.

Another theory that’s been floated is that Trump is actually thinking ahead to 2020: Florida, as a key battleground state, is home to a considerable Venezuelan community. Offering TPS to friends and families in those neighborhoods could possibly be the olive branch Trump needs to secure deciding votes in the state. So, for those cynics out there, maybe it’s not so weird that Donald has has a change of heart when it comes to some immigrants.

Why the White House considering a TPS for Venezuelans isn’t a permanent solution.

Twitter / @AmericasVoice

Well, firstly, it’s important to remember that TPS stands for Temporary Protection Status – with emphasis on the temporary. The question remains as to what would constitute grounds for withdrawing such protection: would Maduro have to step down? Would Venezuela’s political system need to be overhauled? Or would Venezuela have to reach a certain GDP threshold before the US considered it stable enough for Venezuelans to return? And, what about potential pathways to gaining full, legitimate US citizenship from the TPS? The terms of the TPS are yet to be fully explored.

Another, secondary, thing to think about is the fact that not all Republicans are on board with the TPS.

It’s entirely possible that party politics may stand in the way of successfully implementing a magnanimous TPS program.

At the end of the day, while it’s great to see the Trump administration reconsidering its harsh stance on immigration and asylum seekers, at the same time, if they’re planning to institute policy to accommodate for refugees, then they need to plan for the long term. The reality is that if people are being settled in the US under a TPS to escape the hardships and traumas of their native countries, they are inevitably going to build a life, make friends and potentially create a family, under the auspices of a temporary program. Removing them from that life would further traumatize these people and also damage the community. Let’s hope that the current administration keeps this in mind when they’re debating the TPS. After all, these are human lives they are talking about.

Paid Promoted Stories