Things That Matter

Trump Condemns Racism And Hate At Today’s Press Conference But Offers Little In Specifics

Nearly two full days (and a second mass shooting) after the Walmart massacre in El Paso, Trump held a press conference to finally address the two recent tragedies that have shaken the US.

For Trump, it was an opportunity to condemn White Nationalism and to offer up solutions on how he as president will better protect the country from this rising threat. Trump did both of those, kind of, but he also took the opportunity to lay the blame for the spread of racism and hate on everything and everyone other than himself.

After what seemed like an eternity to many people this weekend, Trump finally held a press conference to discuss the tragedies from this weekend.

Two days after the first bullets were fired in El Paso, TX, the president finally held a press conference to speak about the double terror attacks that have shaken the country. In his press conference, Trump surprisingly condemned White Nationalism in very strong words and told the country that “hate has no place in America.”

Ahead of his speech, Trump proposed on Twitter that Congress work to pass legislation on background checks for guns, suggesting that such reforms could be tied to immigration.

For Trump, the ideal way of getting gun control laws passed was to tie to the very same views the shooter in El Paso espoused – stricter immigration laws.

Trump on Monday said that he supported a move to strengthen background checks in the wake of the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, and he suggested tying such legislation to immigration reform. 

During his press conference, Trump also referenced the wrong Ohio city when making his remarks about Dayton.

Of course #ToledoMassacre started trending on Twitter freaking many people out that there had in fact been another shooting. Thankfully, TOledo was safe, the president had just made a big mistake.

This man lost two of his cousins in the Dayton shooting and he is demanding action from Donald Trump.

Many of the victim’s families and friends have made direct, personal pleas with the president begging him to step up as a leader and demand effective gun control measures.

Some were already anticipating Trump’s press conference and had a few expectations -– including Rep. Joaquin Castro (TX).

Although a few reporters asked the president these exact questions, Trump dodged them with vague answers. Although Trump did suggest getting behind existing Republican-approved gun control measures, he didn’t outline any specifics and refused to make any serious commitments.

Many on social media were disgusted by how long it took Trump to offer more than hurried and inauthentic tweets to the victims.

Over the weekend, as the massacres took place, Trump was in New Jersey at his golf resort. Despite sending two tweets, the president continued his rounds of golf and even dropped in on a wedding.

Others couldn’t help but compare the likely reaction of former President Obama against Trump’s delayed response.

Many found themselves reminiscing about the leadership we saw under Obama. Within hours of the Sandy Hook massacre, the President had delivered an address to a shaken nation and developed a comprehensive gun reform package. Obviously that package never made it into law and Obama has cited that as one of the greatest regrets of his presidency.

For many, Trump blaming everything and everyone else for the rise of White Nationalism was infuriating.

Although Trump did finally condemn white nationalism and, used very strong terms to do so, He also made up excuses for basically every domestic terrorist possible.

At this conference this morning, Trump said “The shooter in El Paso posted a manifesto online consumed by racist hate. In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry, and white supremacy. These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America. Hatred warps the mind, ravages the heart, and devours the soul.”

But he also laid the blame on mental illness and video games – both of which have been debunked my several studies and mental health organizations. He also continued placing blame on the “fake news media” and even on social media.

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Motivated By Jealousy, a Man Shot and Killed a Family of Six At a Party In Colorado Springs

Things That Matter

Motivated By Jealousy, a Man Shot and Killed a Family of Six At a Party In Colorado Springs

via Getty Images

Colorado has a history of mass shootings that date all the way back to the 1999 Columbine Massacre. Just a few months ago, 10 people died from a mass shooting in a grocery store in Boulder, CO. And this past weekend, more people lost their lives at the hands of a madman with a gun. This time, the shooting happened in Colorado Springs.

Over the weekend, eight people were shot and killed. The shooting happened at a birthday party in Colorado Springs. The police say that the suspect shot the family because he was jealous that he wasn’t invited to the party.

“When he wasn’t invited to a family gathering the suspect responded by opening fire and killing six victims before taking his own life,” said Colorado Springs police chief Vince Niski about the shooting.

The Colorado Springs shooting victims were all family members and all Latino. They are: Melvin Perez, 31, Mayra Perez, 32, Jose Gutierrez, 21, Joana Cruz, 53, Jose Ibarra, 26, and Sandra Ibarra, 28. Three children, aged 2, 5, and 11, also witnessed the shooting, but survived. According to police, the murders left all three children orphaned.

The shooter was 26-year-old Teodoro Macias. Macias and Sandra Ibarra for a year. Macias took his own life after his rampage.” “At the core of this horrendous act is domestic violence,” Chief Niski said. “The suspect, who was in a relationship with one of the victims, displayed power and control issues in this relationship.”

The Colorado Springs shooting is sparking a national discussions about domestic violence, misogyny, mass shootings, and gun control legislation.

“In Colorado, we’ve had domestic terrorism incidents where lots of people were killed,” said Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers. “We’ve had random acts like going into King Soopers or a movie theater. But let’s not forget about the lethality of domestic violence.”

According to police, Teodoro Macias had no criminal record. Sandra Ibarra never reported any incidents of domestic violence. But family members told police that Macias was “jealous” and “controlling.”

Macias tried to isolate Ibarra from her family–hallmarks of violent and abusive partners. The couple had been fighting the week before the shooting.

Right now, the extended family of the victims are struggling to make funeral arrangements because the amount of loved ones that have died is “overwhelming”.

Thankfully, a family friend has set up a Facebook page to raise funds for the family’s funeral expenses.

In the meantime, the Colorado Springs community and the nation at large are reeling over another mass shooting. This time, the epidemic of domestic violence fueled this mass shooting. “Women in the U.S. are 21 times more likely to be shot and killed than women in any other high-income country,” wrote gun control activist Shannon Watts on Twitter. “Every country is home to domestic abusers, only America gives them easy access to arsenals and ammunition.”

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Latino Man Whose Wife Died In Atlanta Spa Was Handcuffed, ‘Treated Like A Suspect’

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Latino Man Whose Wife Died In Atlanta Spa Was Handcuffed, ‘Treated Like A Suspect’

As we continue to learn more about the attack on Atlanta’s Asian-American community that left eight dead, we also are learning about Mario González – a survivor of the attack who was treated like a suspect by the Cherokee Sheriff Department.

Despite having lost his wife in the gunfire, police refused to share that news with González as he was handcuffed for hours amid the chaotic scene that was unfolding in the Atlanta suburbs.

A survivor of the Atlanta spa attacks says he was treated like a suspect instead of a victim.

The Latino man and husband who survived the Atlanta spa shootings that killed his wife says cops treated him like a suspect instead of a grieving victim — keeping him handcuffed for hours without telling him his spouse was dead.

“They had me at the police station for all that time until they investigated who was responsible or what had happened,” Mario González said during an interview with the Spanish-language news site Mundo Hispanico. “In the end, they told me my wife had died.

“They knew I was her husband,” Gonzalez said. “Then they told me she was dead when I wanted to know before. I don’t know, maybe because I’m Mexican,” he said. “Because the truth is that they treated me very badly.”

Law enforcement hasn’t responded to the allegations but are already facing severe backlash.

Representatives for the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment on Sunday, but the accusations leveled by Mr. González come after the agency had already faced scrutiny after a spokesman for the Sheriff’s Office described the gunman as having “a really bad day.”

The spokesman, Capt. Jay Baker, was no longer the office’s public representative on the case, and the sheriff, Frank Reynolds, apologized and defended Captain Baker as not intending to disrespect the victims or their families. “We regret any heartache Captain Baker’s words may have caused,” Sheriff Reynolds said.

González and his wife had been on a date night when the massacre took place.

The couple had arrived to Young’s Asian Massage for a fun date night, where they’d both enjoy a relaxing massage. They arrived shortly before the shooting started, Mr. González said in the video interview, and they were ushered into separate rooms for their massages.

Mr. González had met Ms. Yaun at a Waffle House restaurant, where he was a customer and she was a server. Ms. Yaun had been a single mother, raising a 13-year-old son. The couple married last year and had a daughter, who is now 8 months old. “What I need most right now is support,” Mr. González said in the interview.

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