Things That Matter

Trump’s Citizenship Question Was Blocked By The Supreme So Of Course He Now Wants To Delay The Census

President Trump’s goal to have the 2020 census ask everyone in the United States if they are a citizen came to a halt. The Supreme Court ruled that the rationale provided by his administration in having the question wasn’t necessary. The 5-4 ruling allows the administration to start over and try to come up with new reasoning for adding a citizenship question. It’s also caused doubt on whether there’s enough time to actually put the question on Census forms. Now, President Trump has vowed to try delaying the 2020 census after the ruling.

President Trump took to Twitter to express his dissatisfaction with the ruling and his plans to challenge it.

Credit: @realDonaldTrump / Twitter

The ruling marked a major blow for the Trump administration. While there is still a chance of lower-court litigation, it would be difficult to get the question on the census in time for the forms to be printed. But the ruling hasn’t stopped the president from trying to challenge it.

“I have asked the lawyers if they can delay the Census, no matter how long, until the United States Supreme Court is given additional information from which it can make a final and decisive decision on this very critical matter,” Trump said in a pair of tweets.

Supreme Court Justice John G. Roberts Jr. didn’t find enough reasoning to add the citizenship question.

Credit: @CoryBooker / Twitter

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross didn’t give honest reasoning for his decision to make a major addition to the census. He cited adding the question especially at a time of increased fear in immigrant communities was questionable.

“The sole stated reason seems to have been contrived,” Roberts said. “The evidence tells a story that does not match the explanation the secretary gave for his decision.”

Now the question is can the Trump administration find a reasonable argument to convince the courts to allow the question on the census.

Credit: @RepCummings / Twitter

The president will now have to fight for the reinstatement of the citizenship question. As of now, the problem is timing since the census takes months of preparation. The Commerce Department deadline to send the paperwork to the printer is June 30.

Only in a certain “emergency” could the Census Bureau finalize the forms as late as October and still print them in time for the census to start in spring. But even then, it would be a tall task with such little time.

What will happen next with the 2020 Census?

The census is a vital issue that affects everyone in the U.S. when it comes to things like allocation of money due to population size. The addition of the citizenship question has many predicting that millions of Latinos and immigrants would go uncounted if the census asked everyone if they are American citizens. It would also convince some to not fill the census form altogether.

Immigrant organizations and Democratic leaders argued to the Supreme Court they would receive significantly less federal money if the census asks about citizenship. Households with non-citizens would be less likely to fill out their census forms due to fears of deportation.

If the Trump administration is set for legal battle for the census question, it’s going to take a while. Experts say this ordeal may take until the fall to get sorted out. The majority of census forms are scheduled to go out March 12, in order for the census count to be completed by Dec. 31, 2020.

READ: Minority Communities Can Breathe A Little Easier, For Now, As The Supreme Court Blocks Citizenship Question From 2020 Census

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This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Things That Matter

This Migrant Mother Spent Three Years In Church Sanctuary But Now She’s Free

Lawyers are working hard to get a deportation order removed against a woman who just left a church sanctuary after three years in the refuge. Although she was previously denied asylum in the U.S., advocates are hoping that under new direction from the Biden administration, her case will be reviewed and she’ll be able to stay with her family in Ohio – where she’s lived for more than twenty years.

A mother of three is back with her family after living three years inside a church.

A mother of three who sought refugee inside an Ohio church from immigration authorities has finally been able to leave three years later. Edith Espinal, who herself is an immigrant rights advocate, had been living at the Columbus Mennonite Church since October 2017 to avoid being deported to Mexico. She’s now out of the church and back with her family following a meeting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials, who have agreed that she’s not an immediate priority for deportation.

“Finally, I can go home,” Espinal told reporters after meeting with the officials. With tears of relief, she celebrated the small victory in the presence of dozens of supporters who accompanied her to the ICE building.

“But it is not the end of her case. We’re still going to have to fight,” her attorney Lizbeth Mateo said.

ICE has agreed to hold off on her deportation proceedings pending her asylum request.

Espinal was released under an order of supervision, meaning that while she’s not considered an immediate priority for deportation, she must periodically check in with ICE officials to inform them about her whereabouts.

She has lived in Columbus for more than two decades and had previously applied for asylum, citing rising violence in her home state of Michoacán. But she eventually was ordered to leave the country, which is when she sought refuge inside the Columbus, Ohio church.

“We’re going to continue pressing the Biden administration to do the right thing, and try to get rid of that order of deportation against Edith, so she can walk freely like everyone else does without fear,” Mateo said during the press conference.

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The Rio Grande Claims Life Of An 8-Year-Old Boy As Migrants Risk Arctic Conditions To Cross Into U.S.

Things That Matter

The Rio Grande Claims Life Of An 8-Year-Old Boy As Migrants Risk Arctic Conditions To Cross Into U.S.

Texas is seeing an unprecedented weather crisis as much of the state is plunged into bitterly cold conditions. But that hasn’t stopped many migrants and refugees from attempting to cross into the U.S. for protection.

Many migrants cross the Rio Grande (or Río Bravo en Mexico) between Texas and the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. Crossing the Rio Grande is always a dangerous undertaking but now, thanks to the freezing weather, it’s an especially perilous journey and it’s claimed the life of another child.

An 8-year-old boy has drowned while crossing the river with his family.

Authorities have reported that an 8-year-old Honduran boy has become the latest victim in a string of drownings at the Rio Grande, between the the U.S. and Mexico. Despite the unprecedented weather, migrants continue to attempt to cross the dangerous river to reach the U.S.

The child was with his family attempting to cross the river when he drowned on Wednesday, just as Texas was gripped by Arctic conditions which have killed more than 30 people and left millions in Mexico and Texas without power, water and food. The boy’s parents and sister apparently made it to the U.S., but were returned to Mexico by U.S. Border Patrol.

According to Mexican immigration officials, the boy “couldn’t withstand the pounding water, which covered him and kept him submerged for several meters”. His body was recovered but attempts to revive him were unsuccessful.

The Rio Grande is notoriously dangerous for people attempting to cross the border.

The journey across the Rio Grande has always been a perilous one, with hundreds of people, many of whom could not swim, having drowned over the years after being caught by the deceptively deep waters and strong current.

Add in the current winter storm currently blanketing the entire state of Texas, has produced significant snow and prolonged freezing temperatures, has made the crossing even more dangerous.

In fact, earlier in the week, the river had claimed another victim. A woman from Venezuela died trying to cross the river in the same area after getting trapped in below-freezing currents. Three others suffered hypothermia: one was treated by the Red Cross in Mexico, while the other two made it the US border.

Drownings are just one of the dangers migrants face.

Apart from the potential for drownings, migrants face a wide range of dangerous while attempting to cross from Mexico into the U.S. In late January, 19 bodies were found shot and burned in a vehicle near the town of Camargo, also across the border from Texas.

There’s also the threat of violence from drug cartels and smugglers, corrupt officials, and other extreme elements, such as heat during the summer.

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