Things That Matter

Trump’s Citizenship Question Was Blocked By The Supreme So Of Course He Now Wants To Delay The Census

President Trump’s goal to have the 2020 census ask everyone in the United States if they are a citizen came to a halt. The Supreme Court ruled that the rationale provided by his administration in having the question wasn’t necessary. The 5-4 ruling allows the administration to start over and try to come up with new reasoning for adding a citizenship question. It’s also caused doubt on whether there’s enough time to actually put the question on Census forms. Now, President Trump has vowed to try delaying the 2020 census after the ruling.

President Trump took to Twitter to express his dissatisfaction with the ruling and his plans to challenge it.

Credit: @realDonaldTrump / Twitter

The ruling marked a major blow for the Trump administration. While there is still a chance of lower-court litigation, it would be difficult to get the question on the census in time for the forms to be printed. But the ruling hasn’t stopped the president from trying to challenge it.

“I have asked the lawyers if they can delay the Census, no matter how long, until the United States Supreme Court is given additional information from which it can make a final and decisive decision on this very critical matter,” Trump said in a pair of tweets.

Supreme Court Justice John G. Roberts Jr. didn’t find enough reasoning to add the citizenship question.

Credit: @CoryBooker / Twitter

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross didn’t give honest reasoning for his decision to make a major addition to the census. He cited adding the question especially at a time of increased fear in immigrant communities was questionable.

“The sole stated reason seems to have been contrived,” Roberts said. “The evidence tells a story that does not match the explanation the secretary gave for his decision.”

Now the question is can the Trump administration find a reasonable argument to convince the courts to allow the question on the census.

Credit: @RepCummings / Twitter

The president will now have to fight for the reinstatement of the citizenship question. As of now, the problem is timing since the census takes months of preparation. The Commerce Department deadline to send the paperwork to the printer is June 30.

Only in a certain “emergency” could the Census Bureau finalize the forms as late as October and still print them in time for the census to start in spring. But even then, it would be a tall task with such little time.

What will happen next with the 2020 Census?

The census is a vital issue that affects everyone in the U.S. when it comes to things like allocation of money due to population size. The addition of the citizenship question has many predicting that millions of Latinos and immigrants would go uncounted if the census asked everyone if they are American citizens. It would also convince some to not fill the census form altogether.

Immigrant organizations and Democratic leaders argued to the Supreme Court they would receive significantly less federal money if the census asks about citizenship. Households with non-citizens would be less likely to fill out their census forms due to fears of deportation.

If the Trump administration is set for legal battle for the census question, it’s going to take a while. Experts say this ordeal may take until the fall to get sorted out. The majority of census forms are scheduled to go out March 12, in order for the census count to be completed by Dec. 31, 2020.

READ: Minority Communities Can Breathe A Little Easier, For Now, As The Supreme Court Blocks Citizenship Question From 2020 Census

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Conservative Cuban-American Federal Judge Tops Trump’s SCOTUS Nominee List

Things That Matter

Conservative Cuban-American Federal Judge Tops Trump’s SCOTUS Nominee List

Supreme Court of Florida / Public Domain

Conservative Cuban judge Barbara Lagoa is said to be towards the top of President Donald Trump’s list of Supreme Court picks. If announced, Lagoa will then undergo a confirmation hearing to fill the seat vacated by Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death.

President Trump is reportedly considering two very conservative women to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s empty seat on the Supreme Court.

Barbara Lagoa, a Cuban-American federal judge, is one of the women President Trump is seriously considering for the Supreme Court nomination. Critics state that President Trump is trying to stack the court to rule conservatively for decades to come. Lagoa was the first Latina to be appointed to the Florida Supreme Court.

Politicians and political pundits are calling on the Senate to follow precedent they set in 2016. During President Obama’s last year in office, the Republican-led Senate refused to confirm a nominee to the Supreme Court following the death of conservative justice Antonin Scalia in March. The argument was that the American people should have the right to decide who fills the seat since it is an election year. In 2020, the same Senate is committing to rushing a hearing as soon as possible.

Lagoa made a name for herself when she worked to fight Elián González’s deportation.

Lagoa, who currently serves on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, worked behind the scenes. Her role in the González fight was in making the argument against the Bill Clinton administration. The judge, like most Cuban-Americans at the time, was desperate to keep González in the U.S. having witnessed the trauma of the Cuban exile diaspora in Miami.

Her position on abortion is up for debate right now.

Lagoa hasn’t had to weigh in on the heavier issues because of her previous positions so it isn’t clear how she’ll rule on abortion matters. However, in her confirmation hearing last year for the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, Lagoa answered question about Roe v Wade.

Senator Dianne Feinstein of California asked Lagoa about the decision and how she would follow it.

“Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), is binding precedent of the Supreme Court and I would faithfully follow it as I would follow all precedent of the Supreme Court regardless of whether it is referred to as ‘super-stare decisis’ or ‘superprecedent,'” Lago wrote in response.

Lagoa did vote to make access voting harder for felons in Florida despite the people voting in 2018.

Lagoa was one of the voting members in the 6-4 ruling of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals that created voting restrictions for felons. The decision was a key legal victory for the Trump administration and Republicans. Lagoa’s vote made it so that felons could only restore their voting rights if they pay their fees and fines, which the state of Florida is not responsible for telling or showing them how to pay them off.

President Trump is expected to make an announcement soon about who he is going to be nominating to the Supreme Court. A political battle is already brewing as both sides of the aisle fight for the seat.

READ: Latino Politicians And Celebrities Mourn The Death Of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

Entertainment

Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

The media advocacy group Define American recently released a study that focused on the way immigrant characters are depicted on television. The second-annual study is entitled “Change the Narrative, Change the World”.

Although the study reports progress in some areas of onscreen representation, there is still a long way to go.

For example, the study reported that half of the immigrant characters depicted on television are Latino, which is consistent with reality. What is not consistent with reality, however, is how crime-related storylines are still an overrepresented theme in these storylines.

The study shows that on television 22% of immigrant characters have crime storylines show up as part of their narratives. These types of storylines further pedal the false narrative that immigrants are criminals, when in reality, they’re just everyday people who are trying to lives their best lives. Ironically, this statistic is an improvement on the previous year’s statistics in which crime themes made up 34% of immigrants’ stories on TV.

These numbers are further proof that the media feels stories of Latino immigration have to be about sadness and hardship in order to be worth watching.

According to Define American’s website, their organization believes that “powerful storytelling is the catalyst that can reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.”

They believe that changing the narratives depicted in entertainment media can “reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.” 

“We wanted to determine if seeing the specific immigration storylines influenced [viewers’] attitudes, behavior, or knowledge in the real world,” said Sarah Lowe, the associate director of research and impact at Define American to Variety. “And we were reassured and inspired to see the impact it had.” 

Define American’s founder, Jose Antonio Vargas, is relatively optimistic about the study’s outcomes, saying that the report has “some promising findings” and the numbers “provide [him] with hope”. He added that there are still “many areas in which immigrant representation can improve”.

via Getty Images

Namely, Vargas was disappointed in television’s failure to take an intersectional approach to immigration in regards to undocumented Black immigrants. 

“Black undocumented immigrants are detained and deported at higher rates than other ethnic groups,” Vargas told Variety. “But their stories are largely left off-screen and left out of the larger narrative around immigration.” 

“Change the Narrative, Change the World” also showed that Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants are also under-represented on television compared with reality. Also worth noting, male immigrants were over-represented on television compared to reality, while immigrants with disabilities were also under-represented.

The study also showed that when viewers are exposed to TV storylines that humanize immigrants, they’re more likely to take action on immigration issues themselves. 

The effect that fictional entertainment narratives have on viewers further proves that representation does, indeed, matter. What we watch as entertainment changes the way we think about other people’s lived experiences. And that, in turn, can change the world.

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