Things That Matter

Twitter Is Cackling Over Trump’s ‘Really Big’ Border Wall He Said Is Being Built In Colorado

This is not The Onion. Bear with us. During a speech in Pittsburgh Wednesday, President Donald Trump announced that the U.S. is already working on building a wall along the borders of New Mexico and Colorado. “We’re building a wall in Texas,” he told the crowd. “And we’re not building a wall in Kansas, but they get the benefit of the walls that we just mentioned.” Trump bragged about how the wall would be “a big one that really works — you can’t get over, you can’t get under.”

Colorado only borders other U.S. states. Twitter is roasting the President and his response is just adding fuel to the fire.

U.S. Governors and Senators alike promptly began roasting the president on Twitter.

Credit: @GovofCO / Twitter

The Governor of Colorado, Jared Polis (D), took the opportunity to quip about how Colorado’s education system is at least providing these basic geography lessons to their kindergarteners. “Well this is awkward,” Gov. Polis tweeted. “Colorado doesn’t border Mexico. Good thing Colorado now offers free full-day kindergarten so our kids can learn basic geography.” Supporters quickly commented, “Drag em Gov!!” and “Get the man some Legos!” Get it? Because Trump just wants to build walls and talk about building walls. Get it out of his system.

Luckily, Senator Leahy (D-Vermont) happened to have a sharpie and U.S. map handy.

Credit: @SenatoryLeahy / Twitter

His constituents were very pleased. “Senator Leahy comes through with the Sharpie drawn map. LMAO.” tweets @Dixieann18. A few Coloradoans took it upon themselves to confirm to the rest of America that they don’t see any walls. “I can see the wall from my house as easily as Sarah Palin could see Russia from hers,” Colorado resident Shay tweeted.

While absurd claims were being made, one resident Coloradoan requested a “moat with dragons and alligators and sharks with laser beams and swimming buffalo” in lieu of the wall.

Credit: @capsfaninatx / Twitter

Amy Cosper tweeted, “As a resident Coloradoan, I think I speak for everyone when I say we don’t want a wall, we simply want a moat with dragons and alligators and sharks with laser beams and swimming buffalo. That’s it. That’s the request.” Promptly, photoshop helped provide a glimpse into what the people of Colorado actually want from Trump. 

However, Colorado might be seeking protection from the MAGA red bordering states.

Credit: @merriamweebster / Twitter

New Mexico gets a heavenly gateway entrance to blue Colorado. The rest of the “riff raff” can stay home, tweets one comedian. Other Coloradoans genuinely just want people to stop gentrifying their state and increasing rent prices. But that’s a story for another day. 

Some people just really want to meet Trump’s high school geography teacher.

Credit: @mozzmama / Twitter

Please, break your silence. Tell us the real deal. Scrap the NDA and return the payoff. Carlos Natal spoke for all geography teachers when he tweeted, “Geography teachers are in mourning.” The key mocking point in all the meme-steryia is the question that’s on everyone’s minds…

Does President Trump think New Mexico is part of Mexico? 

Credit: @ZenGrammar / Twitter

Look, I know the New Mexicans ain’t as bad as them old Mexicans,” one Twitter user joked. “But if Colorado wants a border wall to protect against that, that’s they’re choice.  #ColoradoBorderWall” 

Trump later tweeted that he was kidding.

Credit: @realdonaldTrump / Twitter

Trump claims that he was cracking jokes with the Pittsburgh auditorium allegedly packed with folks from Colorado and Kansas. In response, folks are claiming his comic skills are worse than his geographical knowledge of the country he runs as President. “NOBODY in the crowd laughed,” tweeted one David. “NOT ONE SINGLE PERSON.
He’s as good at comedy as he is Presidenting.
FAIL.”

At this point, others are more concerned with his inability to take responsibility for his actions than they are with his geography. 

Credit: @laloalcaraz / Twitter

“Dude, just take the L,” tweets one doctor. “Coming up with this lame and convoluted story just shows how you’re a shameful liar. Making a silly mistake about a wall in Colorado is not nearly as serious as lying to escape responsibility for your mistakes.”

When, really, we all know what the border wall hype is really about.

Credit: @ChrisJZullo / Twitter

Preach, Mr. Zullo! For a country that legally separated babies from their mothers, and profited off of putting asylum seekers in jail, we’re with this Twitter user who has one response for Trump’s #ColoradoBorder wall: “I’d rather be part of Mexico.”

READ: Joe Biden Forgot To Buy The Web Address For His Latino Outreach Campaign And Now Trump Is Trolling Him

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Learn A Little Bit Of Nahuatl With These Informative TikTok Language Lessons

Culture

Learn A Little Bit Of Nahuatl With These Informative TikTok Language Lessons

@fiercebymitu / TikTok

Nahuatl is an indigenous language that has been spoken in Central Mexico since the seventh century. The language comes from the Aztec people who called southern Mexico and part of Central America home. Xochitl Hernandez is here to break down the indigenous language one TikTok video at a time.

Xochitl Hernandez is here to teach you a little bit of the Nahuatl language, starting with her name.

@fiercebymitu

Here is what my name, Xochitl, means in Nahuatl, a language from the Aztec indigenous people whose roots are in Mexico. #FamiliaLatina #Aztec #hhm

♬ MI MUNDO – Nomad & Lola

In the first post about the Nahuatl language, Xochitl breaks down her name, which means flower. As Xochitl explains, xochi is the word for flower and the -tl added to the end makes it a noun. It is probably best to watch the TikTok in full to get the full lesson.

Indigenous languages are having a moment as people are trying to bring back parts of their ancestral heritage. DuoLingo, the language-learning app, includes two indigenous languages in its arsenal. On the app, you can now study native Hawaiian, also known as ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, and Navajo, also known as Diné bizaad.

Of course, she teaches you how to say mom and dad.

@fiercebymitu

Nahuatl lesson: learn how to say mother and father in Nahuatl, the Aztec language! #FamiliaLatina #hhm #Nahuatl #indigenouslanguage

♬ MI MUNDO – Nomad & Lola

These are two very important words in anyone’s vocabulary. The Latino family unit is one of the most important things in Latino culture. We all have family members we see regularly and talk to even if we don’t like them. Why? Because that’s just how it is because Latino families stick together.

Don’t worry. She made sure to include a lesson on possessive prefixes.

@fiercebymitu

Welcome to another Nahuatl lesson with @xoxochimilca ! Let’s learn about possessives (my, your, our). #FamiliaLatina #hhm #Nahuatl #learnontiktok

♬ MI MUNDO – Nomad & Lola

Possessive prefixes are very important. It is a way to say if something is yours, theirs, ours, etc. For the Nahuatl language, the possessive prefixes are attached to the front of the word to differentiate. It is very similar to the Spanish and English languages in how they are used and presented.

The prefixes are “no-“: my, “mo-“: your (singular), “i-“: his/hers/its, “to-“: our, “amo-“: your (plural), and “im/in-“: their.

Xochitl even broke down terminology for Día de los Muertos.

@fiercebymitu

Feliz #DiaDeLosMuertos ! Today’s Nahuatl lesson is on the word Zemoalxochitl! #HolidayTikTok #DDLM

♬ MI MUNDO – Nomad & Lola

Día de los Muertos is a very popular holiday throughout Mexico and some parts of Latin America. Xochitl breaks down the most important term from Día de los Muertos, the marigold flower. The flower is commonly known as calendulas in Spanish but are called zempoalxochitl. Zempoal means 20 and xochitl means flower. So, literally is means 20 flower but Xochitl explains that it means more like flower of many petals.

Make sure you keep checking the FIERCE by mitú TikTok to keep learning some Nahuatl on your downtime.

READ: This Indigenous Tik Tok Star Gained a Massive Following By Showing Off the Beauty of Her Culture

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

What I Wish My Family Knew About How Their Vote For Trump Impacts My Life

Culture

What I Wish My Family Knew About How Their Vote For Trump Impacts My Life

fidmart85 / cantstayput / Instagram

Politics is a tricky topic for families and friends, especially when you are on opposite sides of the aisle. It’s hard not to take things personally when it comes to how those closest to you vote. Those feelings have been heightened since 2016 when President Donald Trump won on a campaign based on fear and hate. His rhetoric has never changed and his words and policies are having a real impact on the lives of millions, including me and my husband.

My family is a Cuban family living in Florida. They fit the description in more ways than one. They are a close-knit unit always visiting each other and having mini family reunions for every occasion. Covid changed that for a while but over time they have safely created a bubble with themselves. I am one of three in my immediately-extended family to leave Florida so they don’t see my life on a daily basis. I can only imagine that living in Florida would change that.

With the 2020 elections in just days, I have had some hard conversations with my family about things they’ve never understood or asked about. As a gay Latino man living in the U.S., my life hasn’t always been easy and safe. I grew up in a rural town in the Florida panhandle where it was not okay to be visibly and audibly Latino nor gay.

I was 16 when I had my first run-in with violent homophobia. I was at a keg party and I was pouring a beverage. A college student came up to me and asked if I was gay. Knowing the importance of self-preservation, I immediately said no. Without missing a beat, the man sucker-punched me in the face, called me a faggot, and ran to a waiting car that sped off.

My parents never heard that story. I lied to them when they noticed the welt on my face and told them I got elbowed at cheerleading practice. I know. I was a cheerleader and my parents couldn’t see I was gay. It was safer for me to lie and not let my parents know I was targeted for being gay, something they were in no place to accept are Cuban immigrants living in a rural, conservative southern town.

That moment instilled in me a fear that I live with to this day. No matter where I am or what I am doing, I always function at the level that I can be attacked at any time for being gay. President Trump’s rhetoric and administration has made that worse.

During President Barack Obama’s administration, I felt safe for the first time in a long time. I know that comes with some privilege, but it was the first time in in my gay life that I felt safe to be who I was. I came out to my parents. I became involved in politics to get people elected. I traveled as an openly gay man. I was no longer living in the shadows.

The 2016 elections shattered the feeling of safety and peace for me and my friends. Suddenly, all of us were on the chopping block as our rights and dignity were under attack again. The Pulse Nightclub shooting in June 2016 reminded me of how much hate there still was for people like me and the Trump campaign was fanning those flames. I was scared. My family didn’t understand why.

Most of my family voted for President Trump that year. It was a knife through the heart to know that most of my family was not concerned about my own safety and dignity. For them, President Trump’s election was more important than the very real threat he posed to millions of people.

I remember confiding in my family my fear that President Trump would try to eliminate marriage equality, won just one year before. I was made to feel like I was being dramatic. My husband and I got married the Friday after Thanksgiving because we just did not trust what the administration would do.

Four years later, Supreme Court justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito signaled that they want to overturn Obergefell v. Hodges, the case that made my marriage legal. How? With the help of Amy Coney Barrett, who was rushed in with just days left till election day. Marriage equality became law of the land in a 5-4 ruling.

This blow to the LGBTQ+ community comes after the Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that LGBTQ+ people cannot be fired for being LGBTQ+. The ruling in June stated that LGBTQ+ were included in the Civil Rights Act under protection from discrimination based on sex.

The lawsuit brought to the Supreme Court to make discrimination against me legal was drafted by the Trump administration. The man my family voted for wanted to make me less than everyone else.

One of the first cases before the majority conservative court that could erode LGBTQ+ rights is Fulton v. City of Philadelphia. The case, which will be heard the day after the election, will decide if private agencies that receive government dollars can refuse people based on their sexual orientation, gender identity, and even religion. How is this happening in the U.S. in 2020?

I am also a recently diagnosed diabetic. The Trump administration has been a hostile enemy of the Affordable Care Act since day one. The ACA, also known as Obamacare, has become increasingly popular with Americans, especially now during the pandemic.

Another case being heard on behalf of the Trump administration is a case to dismantle the ACA once and for all. This would throw millions of people off of their healthcare and would leave millions more with pre-existing conditions without healthcare.

A vote for Trump is a vote to strip people of necessary and life-saving healthcare. We have all read the horror stories of people dying of diabetes because they couldn’t afford their insulin. The Trump administration wants us to go back to those days. The court case could force numerous people to die from treatable and manageable diseases for the sake of profit over lives.

Republicans have no plan to replace the ACA. However, they have continued to lie to the American people and claim that they do.

There are several communities under attack right now. Black lives are at stake. Abortion rights are at stake. Healthcare is at stake. Immigrant rights are at stake. Trans lives are at stake. LGBTQ+ rights are at stake. Our standing in the world is at stake. The soul of our nation is at stake.

Under this current administration, I have seen my friends live in fear that they will lose rights. I have watched friends grapple with the understanding that they have lost rights.

My family claims to care for me, and I am sure that on some level they really believe that. However, as a gay Latino man living in the Trump administration, I have grown resentful. I resent that their votes are costing me and my friends their human dignity. I resent that their vote exacerbated the ongoing pandemic that has cost more lives than it should have. I resent that they ask why I don’t visit despite voting to limit my rights and freedom.

To my family members who have voted against this administration, thank you. Thank you for standing by my side. Thank you for understanding what is at stake for me and my marriage. Thank you for rebuking an administration that has caused unnecessary harm to millions of innocent people.

It is not too late to have your voice heard. Go vote. Millions of us are relying on you using your voice to determine the future of this nation.

READ: Remembering The Victims Of The Orlando Shooting, Many Of Whom Were Latino

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com