Things That Matter

Here Are 21 Tips To Make Sure You Make The Most Out Of Your Internship Whether Or Not It’s Paid

If you’ve landed your first internship, you are probably feeling a mix of emotions. If you’re lucky, this will be the first paying job in your industry that you’ve landed. If not, you may be working an unpaid internship, which can still pay off in connections and experience. Here are a few tips to help you make the most out of your internship.

1. Do Your Homework

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Chances are, you’ve probably already done some homework on your company just to land your internship.  However, before your first day, take a deep dive. Read news articles about your company. If you know who they are, add and check out your new boss on LinkedIn. Have the most information you can about the company’s business and culture.

2. Dress the Part

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The old adage says to dress for the job you want, not the job you have. Don’t be shy about asking your contact (probably someone in HR) what the dress code of the office is, and follow it. Remember – just because everyone else can break the rules and wear jeans on a Tuesday doesn’t mean you should. Don’t overdo it either – the goal of choosing your outfits should generally be to blend in.

3. Make a Good First Impression

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When you first meet your new coworkers, be friendly and approachable. Shake hands. Use your manners that your mom no doubt taught you.

4. Show Up on Time

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This goes without saying, but as an intern, you should always be on time. If you have to be late, fess up honestly and professionally. Send your boss a polite, professional email with your estimated time of arrival. Don’t even think about saying that your grandma died, the cab crashed, or the bus was late. Apologize and be there as soon as possible.

5. Treat it Like a Real Job

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Even if you aren’t getting paid, you need to treat your internship like it’s your first real job. First of all, it is. Second of all, if you show great work ethic, creativity, skills, and the ability to work efficiently in a team, it may become your first real job. At a minimum, you’ll rack up lots of people who will be happy to give you a reference.

6. Clarify Your Responsibilities

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Meet with your boss early and often to discuss exactly what your job responsibilities are. You want to be productive and as helpful as possible, and clarifying your role and responsibilities will help you make sure you aren’t spending your days bored out of your mind, or over your head.

7. Listen, Listen Listen

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Take a cue from Lin Manuel Miranda and talk less, smile more. While you shouldn’t be afraid to speak up at the right time, internships are all about learning. Listen to your coworkers, and learn as much as you can.

8. Ask Good Questions

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Listening well pays off. If you are listening, you will be better able to ask thoughtful questions. Asking questions is a great time to get clarification, but also show that you have been listening and learning.

9. Follow Office Etiquette

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Don’t be afraid to ask questions about the way an office runs. Not sure who gets the front parking spots? Ask. Not sure if the donuts in the break room are fair game. Don’t be afraid to ask – you may save yourself some cringe-worthy embarrassing moments.

10. Be Easy To Work With

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Everyone gets it – work can suck sometimes, especially if you are at the bottom of the totem pole. However, if you are negative all the time, no one will want to work with you and your internship will likely be a dud. Try to be positive and helpful, and leave the personal drama at home.

11. Don’t be Afraid to Do a Little Dirty Work

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While hopefully, your internship doesn’t read like a script from “Horrible Bosses,” don’t be above fetching coffee or other things that may be outside of what you think you should be doing. However, if your bosses’ behavior crosses into harassment or abuse, speak to HR.

12. Proofread Your Work

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Nothing will make you want to stab yourself in the eye or bang your head against a desk than sending a poorly worded email to, say, the entire office. Be careful about hitting that “reply all” button, and read everything over once before you hit send. Don’t put anything in writing that you wouldn’t want the entire company (or the company’s clients) to read.

13. Ask for Feedback

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Schedule regular check-ins with your boss. Ask to adjust your responsibilities if you want to take on more work. Accept any criticism with grace, and work on a plan to improve.

14. Find a Mentor

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This can take time, but find someone who you can click with to be your mentor. Mentors are invaluable in their ability to steer you in the right direction and the beginning of your career and many will stay with you after your internship is over.

15. Ask for More Work

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If you aren’t busy enough, check in with your boss and ask for more work. Don’t be a huge pest to your coworkers, however. Check-in, but don’t be a nuisance. If your department doesn’t have anything for you at the moment, ask if you can shadow someone in another department. Knowing how all aspects of a company works is valuable.

16. Read Industry Publications

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Read trade magazines, blogs, and other publications. This will help you feel less clueless if you are included in meetings or asked to work on projects. Knowing industry-standard terms of art can help you get by, but don’t be afraid to ask what someone is or means if you don’t understand.

17. Attend Training Sessions

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Many companies offer free lectures, seminars, or lunchtime training sessions. Take advantage of every one of these you can. Not only will it help you get to know your current company, but it will also give you experience and knowledge you can add to your résumé.

18. Be Social

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It goes without saying that networking is one of the most critical parts of an internship. Getting to know people and making positive impressions leads to references and jobs. Make sure to attend office social events like happy hours, parties, and retreats if at all possible. Keep it professional though.

19. Stay Off Social Media

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Like it or not, there is a stereotype for millennials that they are glued to their phones. Defy the stereotype. Check your phone on breaks, but don’t be glued to your phone, even if your coworkers are. Stay focused and attentive to your job.

20.  Ask for References

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Before you leave your internship, capitalize on all your hard work by asking your boss and coworkers if you can use them as a reference, and what contact information is best. Consider asking one or two people for a letter of reference to add to your files.

21. Reflect on Your Experience

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This is an incredibly important part of your internship. If you found that you hated every moment of your internship, consider exploring a different type of job in the same field. Consider what things you did like, and didn’t and seek out opportunities that best fit your skills and passion.


READ: Listen Up College Kids, These Are The Things You Shouldn’t Ever Do

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‘Side Hustle’ Episode 2: Nude Modeling And Friend Rentals

Things That Matter

‘Side Hustle’ Episode 2: Nude Modeling And Friend Rentals

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Side hustles aren’t just limited to freelance writing gigs. There is a vast world of side hustles that can make people a lot of money. Some of them involve art, modeling, and unusual rentals that people would need. That is what the second episode of mitú original series “Side Hustle” is all about.

“That’s not art. That’s you being nude.”

Dorian Wood and Tatyana are young Latinos trying to make it in this wild world in which we live. While some people rely on a regular 9-5 job to make everything work, these two people found a way to take something they like to do and make it profitable.

Wood is using his body to make money and a name for himself with a global audience. His art is something that some people just don’t understand but he is beloved in the art world for his performance art. His nude body is the subject of his work and he has been featured in art shows around the world.

Tatyana is a college student working her way through college like so many others. However, she is taking a different route to pay for her college courses instead of working a retail job. What she has to offer is friendship and it’s paying off.

Wood might be celebrated for his art but his mom has some thoughts.

“I did a show in Madrid and this artist comes up to me after the show and offers to do a mural of me so I just said, ‘Okay. What have I got to lose?’ A few months later he sends me this video of him putting the finishing touches on a four-story mural in Segovia in Spain of me completely naked and my jaw just dropped,” Wood tells co-host David Alvarez. “‘El Gordo’ is what they called the mural. It somehow just triggered something in me. I was like, ‘Oh. Okay. What if I tried art modeling?'”

Wood admits that his friends and family are a little confused by his work. He adds: “They think I’m insane. My mother sees me posing nude and doing nude performance art and she’ll tell me in Spanish like, ‘You know. That’s not art. That’s you being nude.'”

Tatyana loves to make friends and now that makes her some money.

“This is just a way for me to pay for classes,” Tatyana explains to co-host Sahsa Merci. “There was a list of 100 things you could do to make side money and I checked a bunch of them out. The Rent-A-Friend seemed like something I could be good at. So, I started it and I really liked how it was.”

Tatyana says that “it was definitely a little too delicate to talk about at first.” She added. “They know that I enjoy making new friends so for me to get some benefit out of it, also financial help for my school, they were happy about that.”

READ: Cuddling And Wrestling Are Just Two Ways To Make Money On The Side

In-Person Courses Have Been Canceled As Well As Recreational Activities, Now Students Are Protesting To Cancel SAT Exams Due To Coronavirus

Things That Matter

In-Person Courses Have Been Canceled As Well As Recreational Activities, Now Students Are Protesting To Cancel SAT Exams Due To Coronavirus

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Virtually every sector of the U.S. economy has taken a hit in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The education sphere is no exception.

According to a recent report by the Washington Post, “an estimated 1 million high school juniors are missing the chance this spring to get their first SAT score, and many others face uncertainty about when they can take the ACT.”

Widespread exam cancellations and postponements have left many students uncertain as to what they will do come application season when many universities and colleges require the test.

Now students are calling colleges and universities to call an end to the tests altogether.

#TestOptionalNOW is the new trending hashtag that students across the nation have created in response to the uncertainty the virus has caused the tests. The hashtag along with a petition by Student Voice.imploring universities to waive the standardized testing requirements for freshmen applicants in the fall of 2021.

But many students are asking for just a temporary suspension, not just during this time of uncertainty. After all, the standardized exams have for decades been scrutinized for the inaccurate measures of intelligence and success.

The college scandal of 2019 —thanks to Aunt Becky and her wealthy cohorts— is just a recent look at how privileged people can easily change the outcome of tests and admissions only by forking money over to do so. Academic-based bribery is hardly a new scheme in the admissions process and the ways in which the system has become intricately rigged to keep out minorities is only just beginning to gain exposure. Minorities and low-income people are marginalized when it comes to admissions, test scores, and the workplace — it’s a system that continuously unbalances society.

When it comes to the SATs, an assessment test meant to categorize students solely on academic merit, this truth is no different.

The original intention behind the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) is to show where a student stands among their peers, to indicate what their next educational move should be.

The SATs date back to the mid-1920s.

Carl C. Brigham, a psychology professor at Princeton University whose early writings strongly influenced the eugenics movement and anti-immigration legislation in the United States, created the SAT for College Board in 1926. Brigham proposed and produced the test after make observations that he said proved “American education is declining and will proceed with an accelerating rate as the racial mixture becomes more and more extensive.”

According to PBS, the College Board “puts him in charge of a committee to develop a test that could be used by a wider group of schools.” And “In 1926 the SAT is administered to high school students for the first time.”

However, the wording as to why students had to take the SATs in the first place is marred with racial discrimination.

The SATs came during an immigration wave, and college boards and universities wanted to define who would be allowed in. The test doesn’t necessarily attest to who is smarter but more extensive information about the student, their race, and economic background. And yet, college admissions board do not consider this a factor in their admissions process. Proving that in a deeply flawed and unequal educational system, where segregation is still alive and well, colleges and education systems continue to fail students of color and those who are not. After all, research has shown that diversity in school’s only further benefits students, particularly in fields that are related to critical thinking and problem-solving.

The truth is that high-stakes standardized tests work in ways that reinforce racist and discriminatory systems of old. Continuing to accept notions that standardize tests are merit-based only perpetuate the race and class gaps reflected in their results.

Now the SATs will include an “adversity rating” that will allow colleges to know the school that a student came from to evaluate them in a more fair way.

The rating — 1 to 100 — would help the college board (who own the SATs) understand a student’s quality of education based on the neighborhood, the school’s economic standing, and other relevant information. So, if a student doesn’t do very well on the SATs, the rating would reveal as to the hardships that student endured. The rating does not include information about their race, but more so the economic struggles.

Some people feel that the “adversity rating” is something people could take advantage of by lying about where they live.

For example, if a parent knows that their child may not do well on the SATs they could lie about where they live to get a better adversity rating. This would help them achieve a better score.

“The idea that ‘this is a great SAT score for someone from your neighborhood, for someone of your background’ — it’s not fair to the students,” Venkates Swaminathan, a college admissions consultant told The Washington Post.

Others say the “adversity rating” will be a significant boost to go alongside affirmative action.

“Merit is all about resourcefulness,” David Coleman, chief executive of the College Board, said to the New York Times. “This is about finding young people who do a great deal with what they’ve been given. It helps colleges see students who may not have scored as high, but when you look at the environment that they have emerged from, it is amazing.”