Things That Matter

It Turns Out Everyone Should Be Obsessed With Teens Portraying Moments In History On Tik Tok

It’s easy to shrug off the rising craze of Tik Tok as another social media trend for a new generation. After all Gen Zers have taken to the app in the same ways that Millenials quickly obsessed over apps like SnapChat and Instagram. But the fun social media video app which has launched millions of videos showing users lip-syncing and performing comedy and talent videos is proving itself as a platform that’s ready to cross generations. Even ones that are hundreds of years apart. 

Recently, a fun trend being shared by Tik Tok teens online has been reiterating moments in history through a more light-hearted lense. From moments in history that explore the Atlantic slave trade to U.S. history teens on TikTok are lighting up the app with facts and lessons.

Colonization Of The Continent of Africa, 1400s

Taking some of the more tragic moments in our world history and simplifying them for their audiences, are generally the usual approach to most of these videos. We love the way this Tik Tok in particular calls out the involvement of Great Britain, France, Spain and Portugal in the colonization of the continent of Africa in the 1400s.

European Age Of Exploration/ Invasion, 1405 – present

This clever Tik Tok teen used music and editing to describe the invasion of the Americas and the destruction of the Indigenous populations in the area. There’s no doubt that the arrival of Europeans in the Americas and continent of Africa brought various diseases including smallpox, the bubonic plague, cholera, chickenpox, and the common cold. While at times the spread of these diseases were by mistake, it wasn’t always accidental. At the Siege of Fort Pitt in 1763,  the British gave items as gifts to Indigenous people that had come from a smallpox infirmary in hopes of spreading the diseases to tribes.

Henry VIII Has His Marriage T Catherine of Aragon Annulled In Favor of Anne Boleyn, 1533

This hilarious Tik Tok pretty accurately conveys the drama that went down when the King of England decided he wanted to make his mistress his wife. Spanish princess Catherine of Aragon didn’t see what she had coming when she married her second husband Henry VIII. The young queen. Though she’d been married to the king for 24 years, he had their marriage annulled. 

Reign of Catherine The Great of Russia, 1762-1796

This Tik Tok portraying the life of and reign of Catherine The Great of Russia truly does cut the story down pretty quickly, but we have to acknowledge who fun and sweet it is.

The Boston Tea Party, 1773

https://www.tiktok.com/@jylecrennan/video/6662720347848051973?refer=embed

This hilarious reiteration of the Boston Tea Party of 1773 will make your side split. The infamous moment in U.S. history is accurately captured, though with extreme brevity, in this Tik Tok clip that shares how the British attempted to help the East India Company from its debts by putting taxes on tea sent to the U…

The Boston Tea Party AGAIN because these teens love 1773

It seems the Boston Tea Party actually tends to be kind of a thing in the world of Tik tok. 

Election of U.S president William McKinley, 1896

Ah the election of U.S. President William McKinley. This fun portrayal of his election ends up ultimately being a great reminder of the fact that corruption has effected our elections for decades and its not just Trump.

German Occupation Of Belgium, 1914

It’s pretty hilarious how this Tik tok user was able to take an iconic moment in reality television to use it to portray an actual reality in World History. Of course, the  German occupation of Belgium was much more destructive than it was catty, which this Tik Tok tends to imply.

The Establishment Of The League Of Nations, 1919

We also love how accurately this Tik Tok user portrays a defining moment in U.S. allyship and support. 

Attack On Pearl Harbor, 1941

And of course, this moment perfectly portrays how a massive flub affected the way in which the U.S. entered World War II.

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Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Culture

Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Carlos Vivas / Getty Images

It is Mexico’s Independence Day and that means that Mexicans around the world are honoring their roots. Twitter is buzzing with people who might not be in Mexico but they will forever have Mexico in their hearts. Here are just a few of the loving messages from people who are Mexican through and through.

Viva Mexico is trending on social media and the tweets are filled with love and passion for the country.

Mexico received its independence from Spain on September 16, 1810 and since then the day has been marked with celebration. The day is marked with parties of pride and culture no matter where you are in the world.

Mexicans everywhere are letting their Mexican flag fly.

Tbh, who doesn’t want to be Mexican to enjoy the day of puro pinche pride? The celebration for Mexican Independence Day starts on Sept. 15 with El Grito. The tradition is that the president of Mexico stands on the balcony on Sept. 15 at 11 p.m. and rings the same church bell that Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla rang in 1810 to trigger the Mexican Revolution.

People are loving all of the celebrations for their homeland.

The original El Grito took place in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato in 1810. While most El Grito celebrations take place at the National Palace, some presidents, especially on their last year, celebrate El Grito in the town where it originated.

Honestly, no one celebrates their independence day like Mexico and we love them for it.

¡Viva Mexico! Mexico lindo y querido. How are you celebrating the Mexican Independence Day this year? Show us what you have planned.

READ: Many Mexicans Are Calling Out Fragile Masculinity As Some Continue To Protest A Controversial Zapata Painting

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This Boricua Is Being Forced To Defend Her Identity As An Asian-Puerto Rican On TikTok

Culture

This Boricua Is Being Forced To Defend Her Identity As An Asian-Puerto Rican On TikTok

@Keishlaheli / TikTok

People of all sorts of racial identities and backgrounds exist all over the world. However, many people remain ignorant to the ways in which different cultures and races change and take on new identities – especially as mixed race individuals are so often forced to walk a thin line between their identities.

Now, a popular Tik Toker from Puerto Rico is being forced to defend her identity as a Puerto Rican because trolls are accusing her of cultural appropriation. Although she might not look like what many expect a Puerto Rican woman to look like, Keishla is all about educating her followers and giving a voice to mixed race Puerto Ricans.

TikToker Keishla is being forced to defend her identity as a Boricua simply because she also has Asian heritage.

Mixed race communities and cultures exist everywhere. Facts are facts. But it’s obvious that not everyone is willing to accept these facts. Case in point: Keishla – a very popular TikToker, who is being forced to defend her own identity.

Keishla, who was born and raised on the island in the town of Borikén is obviously of Asian descent but she also claims her Puerto Rican identity with pride. Videos addressing the topic have gone viral and the comments that followed show a widespread lack of understanding about the diversity of race in Puerto Rico and beyond.

Keishla’s parents were born in China and later migrated to Puerto Rico, she explains in several videos. Some users, however, refused to accept the facts.

Keishla has had to deal with many ignorant comments across social media, but she’s got thousands of supporters also.

Ever since she launched her TikTok channel, users have come for Keishla and her identity and many have accused her of cultural appropriation.

While apparently trying to invalidate Keishla’s identity as a Boricua, one user wrote, “Lol u may consider her Puerto Rican but I don’t. Blood is more important than how she acts to me she can copy us but will never be us.”

And in typical Keishla fashion, she had the best response: “I respect your opinion, even though it’s a shitty opinion.”

Despite all the ignorance and trolls, Keishla has also seen an outpouring of support from fellow Boricuas, Latinos, and others among her more than 53,000 TikTok followers. The conversation has even moved over to Twitter, where many are supporting her identity while also addressing the hate from others.

“There’s a whole ass history of Asians in Caribbean culture,” one user wrote.

“Asians worked next to the slaves in the sugar cane fields in Cuba. Cuba has one of the oldest China towns in the Caribbean. So many Caribbean people have Chinese descent. Y’all don’t know how colonization work.”

Keishla is not alone: the Chinese have a long history on the island of Puerto Rico.

Credit: U.S. Library of Congress

Much like the mainland United States, Puerto Rico is a diverse community of cultures and races from all over the world. Anyone in the island or anyone who visits will notice right away that there is a major Asian community. Although it’s particularly conspicuous in the restaurant industry – with the traditional comida criolla – that’s not all. The Chinese community has contributed to Puerto Rico’s culture and economy in many significant ways.

Today, there are tens of thousands of Chinese Puerto Rican’s on the island. And although the most recent Census data only reports Asians as making up 0.2% of the population, many academics believe the count to be much higher.

Chinese migration has a long and varied history in Puerto Rico, with it reaching its peak in the late 1850s to 1880s. Many were fleeing war and economic devastation, and hundreds of thousands made their way to the U.S. – including Puerto Rico.

Some of these Chinese immigrants went instead to the Caribbean, though—some first to Cuba, where they were incarcerated due to labor revolts, then to Puerto Rico, where they served their sentence in what was essentially slave labor, working on major infrastructure projects.

So, what do you think? Do you agree with Keishla? Let us know in the comments.

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