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Thousands Of People Marched For A $15 Minimum Wage Today

@CitizenTruth_ / Twitter

May 1st has been celebrated as International Worker’s Day, or “May Day”, since the Roman Empire era. Today, thousands of people gathered in Los Angeles for a May Day that rallied against Trump’s immigration policies and a urged for a $15 minimum living wage.

Here’s how LA does it:

1. Yesterday, CHIRLA dropped a banner over a freeway.

CREDIT: @CHIRLA / Twitter

Caption: “Happening NOW: Banner Drop over the 101 freeway overpass. If you see us HONK!

Join us tomorrow for the “Together We #FightBack” May 1st March

#DefendCA #FightBackLA”

2. Today, we marched.

CREDIT: @LALabor / Twitter

Thousands of people and 50 unions and organizations came together today to march from Pershing Square to raise protections for some of the lowest paid workers in America: immigrants.

3. And voted for churros every single time.

CREDIT: @lizfromsela / Twitter

Caption: “How you know #MayDay is going to be ?. #FightBackLA”

Plus, Trump tweeted yesterday, “During Small Business Week, we celebrate the great, hard-working entrepreneurs across our country who have started and operate a small business!” That’s this guy!

4. We used our Facebook filters.

CREDIT: @cid__5 / Twitter

Y’know, if you still trust Facebook.

Caption: “One of my favorite days of the year! #FightBackLA for our families, for our workers, for our immigrant communities!”

5. We ramped up our annual poster-making parties.

CREDIT: @CitlalliChavez4 / Twitter

The butterfly is a symbol for immigration reform, since butterflies have vast migration patterns and are still a revered insect. So, too, should all humans be acknowledged and treated with dignity and equal rights.

6. And then we marched.

CREDIT: @UCLALabor / Twitter

Thankfully, there were no MAGA counter protesters this year, unlike the 2017 LA May Day. Although, there were spottings in Seattle of counter-protesters dressed in MAGA uniforms. The Handmaid’s Tale in me is shaking.

7. Look at all these butterflies!

CREDIT: @PublicCounsel / Twitter

Caption: “We’re ready to go for #MayDay! We’re marching to stand in solidarity with the immigrant community and our clients. #FightBackLA #HereToStay #DefendDACA”

Here’s who else showed up…

8. CARECEN offers legal services to Central American immigrants.

CREDIT: @Carecen_LA / Twitter

Caption: “We’re ready to march for our rights! #DefendCA#FightBackLA#HearToStay#MayDay”

9. The organization created a giant Refugio el Torogoz bird to march.

CREDIT: @Carecen_LA / Twitter

Caption: “For weeks and weeks our staff has put in endless hours to bring this beauty to life, meet “Refugio el Torogoz” the national bird of El Salvador & Nicaragua. #MayDay #FightBackLA ”

10. This woman brought bottled water for the marchers!

CREDIT: @haleyp / Twitter

Caption: “Take care of each other. #fightbackLA”

My heart is bursting. Turns out, there are lots of ways to give back to your community and I hope a Costco is in yours.

11. Then, she marched with CHIRLA.

CREDIT: @haleyp / Twitter

CHIRLA is the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles. ✊

Caption: “when immigrant rights are under attack, what do we do? STAND UP”

12. The Sanitation Workers’ Union marched proud…

CREDIT: @DontWasteLA / Twitter

Caption: “Sanitation workers rights are all workers rights!#greenjobs #zerowaste #fightbackLA #mayday2018″

13. Alongside Nurses United…

CREDIT: @LALabor / Twitter

Because healthcare is a significant issue for undocumented immigrants, many of whom can’t access basic health care like going to the dentist, or the emergency room for a broken bone. This is NOT OK.

14. The Teamsters…

CREDIT: @LALabor / Twitter

…which include pretty much every occupation imaginable, both in public and private sectors to fight for a higher standard of living for all.

15. And McStrikers.

CREDIT: @Fightfor15LA / Twitter

A few workers in the U.K. participated in a McDonald’s walk out after receiving zero hours contracts, unequal pay for younger workers and no union recognition.

Caption: “Solidarity to U.K. McDonald’s workers ON STRIKE!

#McStrike #FightBackLA #DefendCA #FightFor15”

16. Technology has spread the message wider than ever.

CREDIT: @LALabor / Twitter

The May Day Coalition projected this image onto the Metropolitan Detention Center, whose prisoners can see people marching not just on May Day, but for every other movement.

17. Plus, it was raining. In L.A.

CREDIT: @LALabor / Twitter

Did I mention that it was raining in LA today? These Angelinos will not back down from what’s right.

18. “I do it for my daughter’s daughter’s daughter.”

CREDIT: @LAANE / Twitter

There are many reasons to march today. For immigrants, for labor rights, but ultimately, this is for humanity and dignity.

Caption: “Rain or shine, LAANErs stand up for workers! #FightBackLA #DefendCA”

19. Los Angeles marched while smiling.

CREDIT: @aqui_versoza / Twitter

Because, no matter what the trolls say, marching gets shit done. You’re with your people, who bolster your own activism in your personal life, and it makes people pay attention to the issues. I mean, look at you, caring about workers’ rights.

Caption: “We March! We Vote! We Organize! @pwcscorg @domesticworkers #FightBackLA”

20. Rep. Barragan came to march in solidarity with immigrants.

CREDIT: @RepBarragan / Twitter

Caption: “Standing with thousands of workers and immigrants on this #MayDay to fight for better working conditions and livable wages. #FightBackLA #HereToStay #DefendCA”

21. Even though it was gloomy, the turnout was a huge success.

CREDIT: @CAIRLA / Twitter

Caption: “An estimated 2,000 people are in L.A. for the May Day Coalition of L.A.’s March & Rally seeking protection for workers, taking a stand against the anti-immigration agenda & encouraging civic engagement through voting. @CAIRLA is a partner in the event.

#FightBackLA”

22. Some businesses even had signs ready outside their establishment.

CREDIT: @SCOPE_LA / Twitter

Don’t ask me which business that is though. Nobody can tell.

23. At the end of the day, LA’s march was a bilingual march of solidarity.

CREDIT: @UCLALabor / Twitter

Try going to any LA march and not chant, “El pueblo unido, jamas sera vencido”. #NoBordersNoWall

Caption: “activities are now underway! Poster-making session to kick off the day. #fightbackla”

24. Here’s how to help on May 2nd and onward.

CREDIT: @vidcrane / Twitter

Keep supporting street vendors, fair trade labels, and legislators who care about immigration reform. Yes, we just told you to go forth and buy churros (and tip generously).

Caption: “More #StreetVendors rally @Mayday2018 in #LosAngelesCA  #fightbackla”

Here Are 11 Reasons People Protested For Immigrant Rights On May Day In Los Angeles

things that matter

Here Are 11 Reasons People Protested For Immigrant Rights On May Day In Los Angeles

Javier Rojas / mitú

May Day has long been about fighting for workers rights around the world especially in the US where cities celebrate and advocate for workers rights. Los Angeles is one of the most notable May Day rallies in the country where people take to the streets to stand up for immigrant and political causes. The city’s population has a long history of advocating for immigrant rights. Here are some of the people that took to the streets in LA and why this day means so much to them.

Maggie Hernandez, 23 and Giselle  Orozco, 19

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m an immigration paralegal so a lot of my clients are undocumented so I’m here to support them,” Hernandez told mitú. “I’m also a DACA recipient and also here for my parents who couldn’t be here today because they’re working.

Carolyn Gomez, 27

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m out here today to stand in solidarity not only for human rights but for a better society,” Gomez told mitú. “I want to see a society where people are treated with respect and dignity regardless of class, age and social status.”

Gerardo Campos, 22

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“Supporting immigrant rights is a must in today’s political climate and is important for all of us acknowledge the people behind the scenes,” Campos told mitú. “Today is a holiday for all workers and I feel like I’m doing my part today fighting for that.”

Alejandra Pacheco, 25

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I came here today to speak about immigrant rights and to advocate for reform in this country where so many aren’t given a fair chance to have their voice heard,” Pacheco told mitú. “It’s important to have May Day and it’s even more important that we are out here today celebrating it with all these people.”

Gloria Loriva, 63

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m a socialist and I believe that we have to keep marching in the streets for our rights,” Loriva told mitú. “I’ve been an activist for many years, my mother is an immigrant but even if she wasn’t I’d still be out here in the streets marching on May Day.”

Rosie Alonso, 28

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I came all the way from San Bernardino and I used to live in East Los Angeles so I’m here to speak on behalf of my community,” Alonso told mitú. “I want to protect it from gentrification and the displacement and deportation of so many people that live there including my parents who are both immigrants.”

Chantelle Garcia, 22

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I always come every May Day all the way back to when I was in the fifth grade and it’s just important to be here and stand up for immigrant rights, ICE, and Donald Trump,” Garcia told mitú.

Irom Thockchom, 20

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/mitú

“I’m a member of the Answer Coalition and we recognize that we are an anti-imperialism organization,” Thockchom told mitú. “Part of our mission is to support labor at home which is what this day is all about and I want to see equal rights for all working people.”

Jenny Chalappa, 22

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I just wanted to be out here and be part of the change,” Chalappa told mitú. “I’m tired of sitting back and watch everything happen and today is honestly my first May Day. My whole family has always been working class and I just heard about May Day so why not come out support them and all workers.”

Gabriella Vaquerano, 23

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/mitú

“I want change not only for me but for everyone else including families that are too afraid to stand up,” Vaquerano told mitú. “Now that street vending is legal our parents and communities don’t have to be scared to make a living, this is how they live and now we are starting to see some real changes that are going to benefit hard working immigrants.”

Oliver Villanos , 15

CREDIT: Javier Rojas/ mitú

“I’m here to protest for the rights of immigrants and for my family that couldn’t be here today,” Villanos told mitú. “I feel sad that some people are racist to others just because they feel they are not equal to them and I want that change in our country.”


READ: Here Are 25 Of The Best Signs From Nationwide #MarchForOurLives Protests

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