Things That Matter

This Four Minute Film About A Gay Boy And His Crush Is Melting The Hearts Of So Many People And Here’s Why

After teaming up with each other for their thesis project, students Beth David and Esteban Bravo recently finalized and released their short animated film, “In a Heartbeat.” Even though the film is only four minutes long, and includes no dialogue, it’s touching the hearts of so many people, and here’s why…

With a reach of over 3 million+ views in just one day, this short animated film, “In a Heartbeat,” directed by Beth David and Esteban Bravo, is putting people in touch with their emotional side.


As part of their thesis project at Ringling College of Art and Design, David and Bravo collaborated for a year to bring this project to life. The short animated film tells the story of “a closeted boy that runs the risk of being outed by his own heart after it pops out of his chest to chase down the boy of his dreams,” as Bravo explained in an Instagram post. Considering that it’s “very rare that an LGBTQ character is given the spotlight, especially in a medium like animation that is predominantly geared towards children and family,” David and Bravo told NBC they wanted to create a short film representative of not only the LGBTQ community, but specifically of LGBTQ children within that community.

After participating in their school’s annual student juried exhibition, David and Bravo’s short film received the Juror’s Gold Award, which was a huge honor and overwhelming accomplishment for them both.

CREDIT: @ESTEBRAVO / INSTAGRAM

But the Juror’s Gold Award isn’t the only thing David and Bravo are excited about receiving, they are overwhelmed with happiness by the response they’re getting from audiences.

CREDIT: @CRISTINA.BRUNI / @ESTEBRAVO / INSTAGRAM

“As artists, that’s when you know you’ve made something cool — when other artists draw your art,” Bravo told MTV.

Fans are showing David and Bravo their appreciation for “In A Heartbeat” in different art forms including freehand drawings…

CREDIT: @TOIBARA_ / INSTAGRAM

Cosplay…


And memes.

CREDIT: @our_lgbtworld / INSTAGRAM

You can’t forget about the memes.

Even though this was only a four-minute clip, there’s no doubt that “In a Heartbeat” is giving people all the feels.

CREDIT: @OM.IKA / INSTAGRAM / IN A HEARTBEAT / YOUTUBE

Thank you David and Bravo for a beautiful and touching short film animation. ???


WATCH: This Short Film Shows The Hard And Dangerous Life Of Being Undocumented And Trans


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Man Records His Mother’s Vile Anti-Gay Religious Rant After He Tells Her He Is Engaged

Culture

Man Records His Mother’s Vile Anti-Gay Religious Rant After He Tells Her He Is Engaged

henrit0 / Instagram

Henry Jimenez wanted to share the news with his mother that he was finally engaged to his boyfriend. Instead of her being kind to him she launched into a vile and hateful anti-gay rant she disguised as a religious matter. The video of the encounter will break your heart and the son breaks down in tears over her angry words.

Henry Jimenez broke hearts when he posted a video of his mother’s anti-gay, religious rant.

Jimenez shared the news with his mother that he was engaged. The influencer, as so many Latinos, wanted to share in the moment with his mother. He knew what would happen but still wanted to give his mother a chance to know. What followed was a hateful rant that would leave any child in tears.

At one point in the video, the mother says that her son being gay and engaged is going to kill her faster. You can see Jimenez’s heart break when his mother continued her verbal assault about how he is a sinner.

People are stunned that the mother could speak that way to her child.

Credit: _fanyluu / Instagram

“How sad that she is so blind,” wrote _fanyluu. “And how ugly that she is such a blackmailer telling you that you are going to kill her…very bad on her part.”

Seeing moments like this are heartbreaking but create a stronger community of support.

Credit: andrewtorpie / Instagram

Being gay is one of the scariest things. The moment someone realizes that they are gay they immediately become different and have a secret from everyone else. It can be alienating and terrifying to navigate alone. Fortunately, social media created a safe space for LGBTQ+ people to connect and continues to be a valuable resource for LGBTQ+ people.

Despite the video, Jimenez’s love for his fiance is real and enduring.

Congratulations on your engagement, Henry! Love is love is love. We love to see two people happy and in love. May your marriage be filled with all of the happiness and love you two clearly deserve.

READ: A Gay Single Father Of 3 Is Using TikTok To Share His Family’s Love With The World

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This Digital Posada Is All About Helping The LGBTQ Migrant Community, Who Face A Uniquely Challenging Reality

Things That Matter

This Digital Posada Is All About Helping The LGBTQ Migrant Community, Who Face A Uniquely Challenging Reality

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

With homosexuality still illegal in more than 60 countries around the world and attitudes towards transgendered people often even less welcoming, it’s obvious why so many people risk their lives to migrate to the United States.

However, that journey to a better life is often one of many dangerous hurdles and often times, once swept up in immigration proceedings, things don’t get much better.

LGBTQ detainees across the country have shared harrowing experiences of being mocked or tortured for their gender identity or sexual orientation. Many others have been sexually assaulted while in ICE custody or while waiting for their asylum claims at the U.S.-Mexico border. And transgendered and HIV-positive detainees have both been denied medically necessary healthcare that has posed a risk to their lives.

LGBTQ migrants have the same issues and problems to worry about that all other migrants face, however, the LGBTQ experience comes with several extra hurdles.

LGBTQ migrants coming to the U.S. face unique challenges that often put them at increased risk of violence.

Credit: Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images / Getty Images

Like so many others, LGBTQ migrants are often fleeing violence and persecution in their native countries. But despite often fleeing sexual violence and trans- and homophobia, so many migrants are sexually assaulted while in U.S. custody.

While just 0.14 percent of ICE detainees self-identified as LGBTQ in 2017, they reportedly accounted for 12 percent of sexual abuse and assault victims.

Based on a new report from the Center for American Progress, a public policy research and advocacy organization, LGBTQ migrants in federal detention centers are 97 times more likely to be sexually assaulted than other detainees.

Studies show LGBTQ migrants are among the most vulnerable, more likely to be assaulted and killed, especially trans migrants. Of Central American LGBTQ migrants interviewed by the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in 2017, 88 percent were victims of sexual and gender-based violence in their countries of origin; two-thirds suffered similar attacks in Mexico.

Human rights group allege that ICE fails to provide proper medical care to LGBTQ migrants – particularly trans and HIV-positive detainees.

Migrant advocacy groups and several lawmakers have demanded that ICE release all LGBTQ detainees and anyone with HIV in the agency’s custody, because the government has repeatedly failed to provide adequate medical and mental health care to them.

“We know that lack of medical and mental-health care, including lack of HIV care, is the norm,” Roger Coggan, director of legal services at the Los Angeles LGBT Center, told the San Diego Union-Tribune. “By the Department of Homeland Security’s own count, 300 individuals identifying as transgender have been in custody and at the mercy of ICE since October of 2018.

For detainees with HIV, antiretroviral treatment is necessary to help kill and suppress the virus which ensures a healthy life but also reduces the risk of transmission to basically zero. Yet ICE is failing to provide this life-saving care.

Johana Medina Leon, a transgender woman who was detained at Otero and had tested positive for HIV, fell seriously ill and died at a hospital in nearby El Paso. Leon, 25, was the second trans woman to die in ICE custody in New Mexico in the past year. Roxsana Hernandez, 33, died in November 2018 after falling ill at the Cibola County Correctional Facility.

Meanwhile, Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” policy is presenting additional challenges to the LGBTQ community.

Credit: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

While the Trump administration has severely limited asylum qualifications for Central Americans fleeing gang violence and domestic abuse, migrants can still request asylum based on persecution because of their gender identity and/or their sexual orientation. But their path is far from easy.

The administration continues to return LGBTQ migrants to Mexican border cities where they face assaults, kidnappings and death while they await U.S. court hearings.

“Here, the same as at home, the police discriminate against us,” Alejandro Perez told NBC News in early October. “We’re very vulnerable. I don’t feel safe here in Mexico.”

Border Patrol officials initially said “vulnerable” asylum seekers would be exempted from the Remain in Mexico program, including those who are LGBTQ, pregnant or disabled. But that hasn’t been the case.

Thankfully, the LGBTQ Center Orange County is working hard to protect and help the most vulnerable.

Southern California is home to the nation’s largest undocumented community, which means organizations like the LGBTQ Center Orange County have their work cut out for them. However, the center has proudly stood up to help in powerful and life-changing ways.

The LGBTQ Center OC is one of the leading migrant outreach centers in the region, attending numerous events throughout the year and providing outreach at the Mexican consulate in Santa Ana – each year reaching more than 5,000 people. The center also played a pivotal role in ending the partnership of Santa Ana Police and the Orange County Sheriff with ICE, bringing an end to ICE detention within the county.

As those migrants were detained at facilities outside the county – sometimes more than two hours away – the center mobilized volunteers to help stay in touch with detainees. This team helps provide much needed companionship through letters and notes, as well as providing legal representation and even cash payments that help detainees get everything from a filling meal to in-person visits.

And the work the center does is so important because it shouldn’t just be on detainees to speak out. All of us as part of the LGBTQ and migrant communities should support those in detention and speak out about the injustices they’re suffering in detention.

The Center is hosting a digital posada and you’re invited!

We all know the tradition of a posada. So many of us grew up with a holiday season full of them and although this year will look very different (thanks to Covid-19), the LGBTQ Center OC wants to keep the tradition and celebration alive.

Posadas commemorate the journey of Mary and Joseph in search of a safe refuge, a sentiment that so many migrants and refugees in our communities can relate to. It’s with this spirit that the center is hosting it’s annual posada – but virtually.

The important event is free for all to attend but is a critical fundraising event that enables the center to do all that it does for the LGBTQ migrant community across Southern California. You can learn more and RSVP here but just know that it’s an event you do not want to miss.

Not only will you be able to virtually hang out with members of the community and leaders from the LGBTQ Center OC but there will also be a screening of the short documentary, Before & After Detention, a spirited round of lotería, raffle, and a live performance by the LGBTQ Mariachi Arcoíris de Los Angeles.

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