Things That Matter

Ever Wondered What The Mexican Flag Would Look Like As An Anime Samurai, Well Now We Know

It’s no doubt that the Japanese do a number of things better than anyone else.

As the host of the 2020 Olympics, Japan first wowed us with how they decided to produce the Olympic medals – by recycling gold, silver, and bronze found in discarded smartphones and laptops. A plan that not only saves them a ton of money, but is also really good for the environment!

Now, it appears that several artists in Japan have reimagined the flags of each competing country as anime samurais to help promote the Games.

A Japanese website is promoting the Tokyo 2020 Olympics in the most Japanese way possible – by combining anime and country flags of the world.

This project isn’t directly affiliated with the government of Japan or with the Japanese Olympics committee. It was just some artists who were excited for the Games and decided to draw some cool samurais and upload them onto a website called “World Flags” to help introduce people to the countries that will be competing in this global competition.

Although the artwork of each of the characters is very Japanese-inspired, each samurai is inspired by the culture, history and national identity of each country, giving us a “harmony in diversity” kind of vibe.

Check out some of the ones they did for Latin American countries below:

Credit: worldflags

The Brazilian samurai has the traditional Brazilian flag front and center in its design. The samurai features the yellow diamond which represents “Mother Earth,” while the blue circle represents the morning sky above Rio de Janeiro on the day the republic was established.

By the way, there is a star that shines exceptionally big above the white belt in the stars among the stars in the blue circle, Virgo Spica. Many may think that this is the capital Brasilia. Actually, this is Para. It is neither Rio de Janeiro nor Sao Paulo. By the way, Brasilia is a small star at the bottom.

Argentina’s samurai is fully representing with the ‘sol de mayo.’

Credit: worldflags

The colors in this samurai outfit are giving me life! And they also included the iconic Sol de Mayo prominently across his chest.

While Mexico’s is complete with an eagle!

Credit: worldflags

We all know the Mexican flag has a giant eagle holding a snake in its talons, so to see it come to life in this form is so cool. And look at those boots!

The artist even named the samurai “Falconer.”

As for the meaning: Green means “the hope of the people in the destiny of the nation”, white means “catholic or religious purity”, red means “blood of a patriot who has united with the country.”

We might be biased, but we think the Latino samurai are probably the best out of them all.

But, in case you were wondering, here are some versions from other countries:

The artists gave a shout out to Old Glory with their version of the US samurai.

And according to the artists: White is purity and innocence. Red is hardiness and valor. Blue stands for vigilance, perseverance, and justice.

And India’s samurai looks pretty amazing.

Credit: worldflags

The colors of the Indian samurai are as follows: the upper saffron color symbolizes Hinduism. The green in the lower row symbolizes Islam. The middle white means the reconciliation of both religions. The union of the two religions is the manifestation of the intention that it is essential for the unity of India. 

And check out the one they drew up for South Africa.

Credit: worldflags

There are two theories about the color of the national flag. 

Red is the bloodshed of the past confrontation, blue is the sky and the surrounding sea, green represents farms and nature, yellow is mineral resources such as gold, black represents the black population, while white represents the white population.

Each of the colors is also derived from the British and Dutch flags of the former colonial powers.

And the Chinese have to got be loving their samurai interpretation.

Red is used as the main color of the flag in socialist countries. It can be seen with the former Soviet flag and the present Vietnam flag. It is a color that represents communism and socialism. 

In China, the flag has become a symbol of class struggle between capitalists and workers. The largest of the yellow five stars is said to represent the Chinese Communist Party that leads to the revolution. The other four represent workers, farmers, patriotic capitalists, and intellectuals.

And can we talk about how hot the samurai is for Italy?!

Credit: worldflags

The Italian flag and the French flag are the same tricolor flag although they are different in color. It is believed that the Napoleonic era is the beginning of the official use of the three-color flag of green, white and red in Italy. 

The tricolor flag was revived as the flag of the Kingdom of Italy, after the defeat of Napolean.

While the samurai from the UAE comes with a legit sword!

The present design dates back to the country’s independence. Each color has a solid origin and meaning, and these four colors are said to be key Arab colors. The four colors are red, green, white and black. Countries around the Middle East also have some of the same four-color flags.

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Katherine Díaz, Salvadorian Surfing Star and Olympic Hopeful, Died After Being Struck By Lightening

Things That Matter

Katherine Díaz, Salvadorian Surfing Star and Olympic Hopeful, Died After Being Struck By Lightening

Photo via isasurfing/Instagram

A tragedy born from a freak accident is rocking El Salvador’s athletic community today. On Friday, El Salvador surfing star and Olympic hopeful, Katherine Diaz, died after being struck by lightening. She was training for an Olympic qualifier.

According to reports, lightning struck and killed 22-year-old Katherine Díaz right after she entered the water at El Tunco beach.

“Katherine came over to hug her [friend], as soon as she finished hugging her, the noise was heard,” her uncle Beto Dia “She, the friend, was thrown by the force of the lightning strike too, the board threw me back. Katherine died instantly.”

According to NBC News, onlookers pulled Katherine Diaz to the shore and attempted to revive her, but by that time, it was too late.

Her family, of course, is mourning the loss of their loved one. “We were very close,” her sister, Erika Diaz said to a local publication. “Katherine was a girl full of energy, with a free spirit who made everyday feel worthwhile. Unfortunately, she left us.” But Erika said she is glad that her sister passed while doing what she loved the most–surfing.

Katherine Díaz had dedicated her life to the complicated and rewarding sport of surfing.

Katherine Díaz Hernández had been surfing since she was 9-years-old. The 22-year-old was training to qualify for the 2021 Summer Olympics–the first time surfing would ever appear at the international games.

El Salvador’s surfing federation, FESASURF, released a statement lauding Díaz for her talent. “Katherine was a girl very passionate about sports, she was very motivated and happy for the event that was approaching.”

The International Surfing Association posted a tribute to Diaz on their Instagram page.

“Katherine embodied the joy and energy that make surfing so special and dear to us all, as a global ambassador of the sport,” they wrote. “She excelled at the international competition level, representing her country with pride at both the ISA World Surfing Games and ISA World Junior Surfing Championship.”

“We send our heartfelt condolences to Katherine’s family, the surfers of El Salvador, and to all those in the international surfing community whose lives she touched. We will never forget you.”

El Salvador’s surfing community has planned a “paddle-out” ceremony that is traditional in the death of a surfer.

According to Surfer Today, a paddle-out ceremony is “an ocean-based ceremony consisting of a mix of spiritual, metaphysical, and ritual actions that acknowledge, remember, and celebrate a fallen peer.”

“It’s a symbolic rite of passage that showcases traces of connection and separation, departure, and continuity.”

Katherine Díaz’s funeral services were on Saturday morning. The paddle-out ceremony will be held on Tuesday.

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These Latino Athletes Have Delivered The Most Iconic Moments In Sports History

Entertainment

These Latino Athletes Have Delivered The Most Iconic Moments In Sports History

Latin American and U.S. Latino athletes have given the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking world countless moments of joy, pride, and hope. Latin American sportswomen and men usually come from disadvantaged backgrounds so their stories of pride and success inspire us even more. It would be almost impossible to enumerate all the triumphs achieved by Latin American athletes, but we are listing the Most Iconic Moments In Sports. Sí se puede!

When Diego Armando Maradona scored the infamous but glorious goal known as “La mano de Dios” (“The hand of God”)
June 22, 1986, Estadio Azteca in Mexico City, in a quarterfinals game against bitter rivals England

Diego Armando Maradona
Credit: romanzosportivo / Instagram

This has got to be the single most controversial moment in World Cup history. Argentina was facing England in the quarterfinals and Maradona jumped to hit the ball with his head. But thing is, he actually hit it with his hand and the ball penetrated the net. The English were of course appalled, but this event remains one of the most memorable in the long history of joy and drama of the Argentinian national team. We got to also remember that there was some bad blood between Argentina and England at the time, a product of the Falklands War. 

When Ana Gabriela Guevara excelled in an Olympic event that was uncharted territory for Latina athletes
2004 Olympic Games, Athens, Greece

Gabriela Guevara
Credit: efemerides_de_famosos / Instagram

Ana Gabriela Guevara, who is now a very controversial politician, gained notoriety for scoring a silver medal in the 2004 Athens Olympic Games. She competed in 400m, a test that Mexican track athletes don’t generally excel. But she proved that she is one of a kind. 

When Mexican boxing legend Julio César Chávez pulled off a miracle and knocked out Meldrick Taylor in the last few seconds of their championship unification fight
March 17, 1990, Las Vegas, Nevada

César Chávez
Credit: jcchavez115 / Instagram

In a rare encounter, the world’s two best boxers met for a unification fight. Both were unbeaten and Chávez was heralded as a national hero in his native Mexico. The fight was as tough as it gets, with both boxers sustaining enormous amounts of punishment. With 17 seconds left on the clock and behind in the scorecards Julio César connected with a massive right hand. The contest was stopped with two seconds left: a boxing miracle of the highest order.

When Fernando Valenzuela became a baseball hero and an icon of Mexican-American pride and excellence
1981-1986

Fernando Valenzuela
Credit: 5browncrew / Instagram

Fernando “El Toro” Valenzuela became an icon of Latino sportsmanship after an excellent 1981 season with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He was one of the first Mexicans to break into the mainstream in the United States. He inspired and continues to inspire, millions of paisanos. He was an All-Star in each season of his incredible 1981-1986 run. 

When Gabriela Sabatini demonstrated that Latinas can excel in the tennis court
US Open, 1990, Womens’ Tennis champion!

Gaby Sabatini
Credit: sabatinigaby / Instagram

Tennis is a perilous sport for Latin Americans because it is mostly dominated by the United States and Europe. But Gaby Sabatini showed that Latino girls can be ace too! She won the U.S. Open in 1990, defeating the German Stefi Graf. Una dama del deporte blanco en toda la extensión de la palabra.

When Colombian dynamo Nairo Quintana reached the stars on his bike
Since 2012

Nairo Quintana
Credit: nairoquintanaoficial / Instagram

Nairo Alexander Quintana Rojas is perhaps the greatest Colombian cyclist of all time. That is a big claim considering the long and glorious history of the sport in Colombia. Quintana is known for his sustained attacks during steep hills: when most of his adversaries struggle, he has his best performance. He was won multiple stages of the Tour de France and the Giro di Italia. 

When Felipe “Tibio” Muñoz swam toward a gold medal and got a whole country celebrating after some pretty traumatizing events
1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City

El Tibio
Credit: mexico_68_el_tibio_munoz. Digital image. El Grafico

Prior to the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, Mexicans had experienced a traumatizing event when the army attacked a group of students and civilians who were protesting at the Tlatelolco Square. The country was split emotionally and politically. But then came “El Tibio” and at least for a brief moment, the country was united behind a young man who swam his way to a gold medal. The memory of his accomplishment is still brought up today when thinking of the greatest sporting moments in Latin American history. 

When Ecuadorian athlete Jefferson Perez won an Olympic gold medal in the Atlanta Olympic Games
Atlanta Olympic Games, 1996

Jefferson Perez
Credit: jeffersonperezq / Instagram

Ecuador doesn’t have a strong Olympic team, and medals have been few and far in between. That is why Jefferson Perez is a standout in the sporting history of this proud South American nation. During the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games, Perez did the unthinkable. As Rihannon Walker writes in The Undefeated: “Ecuador’s Jefferson Pérez, Russia’s Ilya Markov and Mexico’s Bernardo Segura struggled to find separation from one another as they neared the finish of the 20-kilometer walk at the 1996 Olympics. Then Pérez began to take advantage of having the youngest legs of the trio and powered himself into the lead. As a crowd of 85,000 waited to see who would be the first to appear at Olympic Stadium, Pérez made a dramatic solo entrance and finished in 1 hour, 20 minutes and 7 seconds to become the youngest gold medalist in the 20-km event at 22. His victory also secured Ecuador’s first Olympic medal.” Just wow, a moment to remember forever. 

When Teófilo Stevenson reigned supreme in amateur boxing. Viva Cuba!
1972, 1975, and 1980 Olympic Games in Munich, Montreal, and Moscow

Most Iconic Moments In Sports
Credit: saintmax55 / Instagram

In the 1970s Muhammad Ali was the greatest name in heavyweight boxing, but he was perhaps not the best. Many believe that amateur legend Teofilo Stevenson of Cuba would have beat the great Ali. But, alas, Cuban boxers were not allowed to turn professional and a fight between the two never materialized. Stevenson’s amateur career extended 20 years, from 1969 to 1986. He won a total of three gold medals, un logro extraordinario

When “Las espectaculares morenas del Caribe” Cuban female volleyball team captured the world’s imagination and won three consecutive Olympic gold medals
Barcelona 1992, Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

Most Iconic Moments In Sports
Credit: AAuFzt9. Digital image. MSN. 

This group of amazing Cuban ladies totally dominated volleyball for three Olympic Games, and then won the bronze in their fourth attempt. Puro Cuba! 

When Costa Rican swimmer Claudia Poll surprised everyone and became a national icon
Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games

Most Iconic Moments In Sports
Credit: AAuFGZl. Digital image. MSN

This amazing woman was born in Nicaragua but later became a Costa Rican citizen. She won a gold medal in the Atlanta Games (a big year for Latino athletes!) and is considered the greatest sports figure in the history of the Central American nation. She also won two bronze medals in the 2000 Sydney Olympics. A true force of nature.

READ: 11 Unusual Sports You Can Find In Latin America

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