Things That Matter

These Are The 13 Gifs That Absolutely Dominated The Gif World In 2019 According To Giphy

Whether you’re team GIF or team JIF, it doesn’t matter, the animated shorts speak to all of us. Uniting group texts, Slack channels and email threads alike with their humorous content, we’re all obsessed with them. So, naturally, when Giphy revealed its top 25 most-viewed GIFS of 2019, we had to share the very best with you all. In a time when words just aren’t enough, GIFs did all the talking for us. The list features a healthy dose of headshaking “Nopes” as well as a good amount of Keanu Reeves to maintain balance, have a look at the top 13. To see the full list, click here.

1. And I Oop by Jasmine Masters 

419.1 million views. This was the best meme of 2019. Period. The iconic drag queen from RuPaul’s Drag Race season 7 is the reigning queen of internet humor. 

2. Angry by Shameless

with 382.1 million views is all of us. She expresses our disapproval, disgust and anger towards basically everything/everyone. 

3. Say Hello by Nick Jonas

We really wouldn’t know how to explain the fact that Nick Jonas got nearly 300 million views. Guess his way of saying ‘sup’ really summed up everyone’s mood this year?

4. Happy by Samm Henshaw

“Wake up and get yourself to church Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah”

5. Great Job by Bounce TV

“Thumbs up” consistently ranks high as a term users are searching for on GIPHY and Carl Payne’s (from Bounce TV’s Last Call) is a great one!

6. Happy Cheering by Bluesbear

It’s cute, it’s wholesome and it’s happily cheering on you. What else do you need in a positive GIF?

7. Keanu Reeves’ Thank you by Netflix

Keanu’s role in Always Be My Maybe was VERY much loved by fans. The movie was super popular and seeing Keanu let his hair down and show his sillier side made everyone love him even more than they already did… if that was possible.

8. I love you by Mia Page

“Love” is by far the most popular emotion searched and shared on GIPHY. So it’s no surprise that this sweet animated GIF is included in this list.

9. No Way “smh” by Desus & Mero

The Kid Mero —one half of the Bodega Boys, who host a popular podcast and the “Number 1 Show in Late Night” (self-proclaimed by them)— is always good for a great reaction GIF, whether you want to express Bronx Pride, Dominican Pride, New York City Pride, or just a plain old “No.”

10. Happy/Excited dance by Khalid 

2019 was Khalid’s year, and this GIF shows it. The perfect “having a good time so don’t bother me I just want to vibe” GIF from his music video “Young Dumb and Broke.”

11.“Whatever” by Friends

FRIENDS had quite a year in 2019! Not only did the show celebrate its 25th anniversary, but an official FRIENDS library channel launched on GIPHY! It’s no shock that this funny reaction GIF of Phoebe really blew up.

12. “Jack Nicholson ‘Yes’” by Nick Kroll

Nick Kroll’s version of the classic Jack Nicholson nodding GIF is spot on. This year he stopped by GIPHY to recreate a bunch of classic GIFs, including his own take on this year’s top GIF (“And I Oop”).

13. “Dog Yes” by TikTok

2019 was the year of TikTok and, to be honest, every year is the year of a good dog! This good boy popping up with a solid nod “YES” is exactly what the users want — a surprise, a super cute dog, and a definite reaction. 

Cheetos Released The Official Name For The Cheesy Dust Left On Your Fingers And Some People Seriously Hate It

Culture

Cheetos Released The Official Name For The Cheesy Dust Left On Your Fingers And Some People Seriously Hate It

Pixabay

Frito-Lay has declared the cheesy residue left on your fingertips after eating Cheetos is called “cheetle.” Don Cheadle might be feeling some type of way right now. The press release has caused some confusion on social media with many Twitter users refusing to accept that this is the correct terminology and questioning its origins.  

To blow matters perhaps even more out of proportion, actor Ed Helms claims a comedian came up with the word “cheedle” in the 1980s. Some users even pointed out that the term was added to Urban Dictionary in 2005. 

Frito-Lay declares Cheetos dust “Cheetle” in official press release.

“We’ve seen the way Cheetos lovers don their red- and orange-dusted fingers like a badge of honor, and we’re always looking for ways to help them step up their snacking game,” Brandi Ray, senior director of marketing, Frito-Lay North America said in a press release. “The only way to truly take popcorn to the next level is to add the iconic Cheetle, the cheesy dust that will entice Cheetos fans to snack on this popcorn all year long.”

The move to bring Cheetle into the popular lexicon comes as Frito-Lay announces new Cheetos popcorn. The snack is popcorn with Cheetle as a topping in two flavors including Cheddar and Flamin’ Hot. 

“Snacking on Cheetos has become a special experience for many fans, including the experience of having the iconic cheese dust left on your fingers,” Rachel Ferdinando, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of Frito-Lay North America, told TODAY. “We (Frito-Lay executives) have long called that red and orange cheese dust ‘Cheetle,’ but it became clear from our fans the special interest they had, so we knew it was time to share our beloved name for this magic ingredient.”

Where did the term “Cheetle” come from? What is the truth? 

Ferdinando claims that Frito-Lay trademarked the term in 2005. An earlier form of the word was spelled “cheedle.” A 2005 entry in Urban Dictionary defines cheetle as, “the orange, powdery residue left on your fingers after eating Cheetos.” Perhaps, a Frito-Lay employee submitted it? 

“Frito-Lay officially trademarked ‘Cheetle’ in 2005, but the company hasn’t used (it) externally in much capacity until now and haven’t told consumers about it,” Ferdinando said. 

However, the Hangover actor Ed Helms believes the term was invented by Saturday Night Live alumni Rich Hall, who coined “cheedle” in his book sniglets

“An earlier form of Cheetle, spelled cheedle, was found to be one of the sniglets (fun coinages) of comedian Rich Hall in the 1980s, which he defined as ‘the residue left on one’s fingertips after consuming a bag of Cheetos.’ The first known proper use of Cheetle, as such, was found in a finger-painting online computer game as early as 2004 and 2005, after which the name was first popularly defined on Urban Dictionary,” according to Dictionary.com.

Many Twitter users did not know how to feel about Cheetle. 

As can only be expected there were many Don Cheadle jokes, but perhaps the best was the one that differentiated between Don Cheetle (the orange-tanned Donald Trump) and Don Cheadle (the Golden Globe-winning actor). 

Some on Twitter wanted to keep things simple.

Other users were just not feeling the name. Why call Cheetos dust “cheetle” when you can call it “Cheetos dust”?

“I love you Cheetos, but no. It’s Cheeto Dust, end of story. In no world am I ever gonna say I have Cheetle on my fingers, WTF,” one user wrote. 

Helms wasn’t the only one on social media upset that Rich Hall wasn’t getting his due credit. 

“So @Cheetos thinks they have come up with the perfect name of the dusty cheesy residue left on your fingers… Sorry, the name Cheetle was used by Rich Hall on NNTN as one of his @SnigletsOFC back in the ’80s,” another user wrote. 

The future is still unwritten, who knows if the term “cheetle” will ever catch on? Personally, I don’t converse about Cheetos enough for it to ever come up casually. Nevertheless, Frito-Lay’s branding effort clearly worked: we’re all talking about cheetle today.

As If The Surreal Movie Adaptation Of ‘Cats’ Wasn’t Trippy Enough, People Are Watching It High And Omg The Reactions

Entertainment

As If The Surreal Movie Adaptation Of ‘Cats’ Wasn’t Trippy Enough, People Are Watching It High And Omg The Reactions

Cats / Amblin Entertainment

From what reviewers and audiences have been saying about Cats, the surreal nature of the movie probably doesn’t need to be enhanced by adding psychedelic drugs. However, that didn’t stop adventurous moviegoers from sampling their drug of choice before sitting through the weird musical —to make the experience even weirder.

For most people, “Cats” is unnerving enough sober.

It tells the story of a group of singing, dancing alley cats who compete for the chance to go to the Heaviside Layer, a metaphor for death and rebirth into the next of their nine lives. Critics have described the movie adaptation as a feverish drug dream, a bad trip. It is expected to lose as much as $100 million, according to Variety. The budget, mind you, was more than $95 million, all going to a rushed production that found the film’s visuals still being cooked even after the movie opened wide over the Christmas holiday.

People are watching the movie on drugs—and their experiences are nothing short of wild.

According to a sweeping new story by The Washington Post, a fraction of that box-office take is coming from audience members who are seeing the movie on drugs, and the results are evidently transcendent. WaPo rounded up some of the best reactions from viewers that saw the movie on mind-altering substances as shrooms, LSD, edibles, and more.

The paper offered a list of compelling, if not encouraging, responses:

“The most terrifying experience of my life. I swear to God my soul escaped me.”

I mean this is a bit dramatic…right?

“Vomited four times but ultimately understood the film on a deep level.”

Now this is definitely a reaction that I think only a high person could have. If you’ve seen the movie, you know it’s true.

“Had a panic attack in the middle of it …”

I feel like this could happen whether you were high or not…

Raina, 25, from South Carolina, said she couldn’t handle the mismatched proportions of the furry animals.

She lasted 10 minutes, “and then I went to the AMC bathroom and threw up”.

Annaliese Nielsen, terrified by the furry face of James Corden, called the film “a special kind of evil”.

That last scene especially, is freaking people out.

Here Judi Dench’s Deuteronomy breaks the fourth wall to address the viewer, and freaks people out. “When Judi Dench turned and looked me directly in the eyes to let me know that a cat is not a dog, I was terrified.”

The movie may be hard to follow if you’re looking for a plot.

Because there is no plot. Basically all the cats —as portrayed by the likes of Rebel Wilson, Jennifer Hudson, Dench, Idris Elba, Ian McKellen, and Taylor Swift— are auditioning for eternal life in the Heaviside Layer, a heaven-like place of rebirth for cats in the upper atmosphere.

“Where their fur ends and their human hands start, it would move in a weird unnatural way,” one audience member told The Washington Post.

“I felt like I was losing my mind…I was just concentrating on taking deep breaths.”

Of course, your choice of whether to enhance the experience of Cats is yours —and your state’s— own, but from what we’ve seen, the movie is likely weird enough to simulate a drug trip without needing to consume them at all.