Things That Matter

Victims Of Hurricane Barry Are Sharing Devastating Photos Of The Aftermath And Experts Are Calling This “The New Normal”

Tropical Storm Barry has officially made its way to New Orleans. As of this morning, it has been reported that Storm Barry has dumped rain slowly as it sweeps inland through Gulf Coast states. There is currently a flash flood watch set in place in Southeastern Louisiana active for the next 6 hours, according to the National Weather Service.

While it appears that it has spared New Orleans a direct hit, others in the state fear for their safety as Storm Barry continues to cause flooding, tornadoes and power outages.

On Wednesday, July 10, preliminary storm swamped New Orleans streets and affected traffic in the city significantly. Tropical Storm Barry had also been categorized a Category 1 hurricane but then weakened to a tropical storm.

According to poweroutage.us., about 125,00 customers in Louisiana and 6,800 customers in Mississipi are without power as of today.

According to AP News, “forecasters warned of a continued threat of storm surge and heavy rains as the center of the storm trudged inland and rain bands along its back half moved onshore. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Sunday parts of south-central Louisiana could still have rainfall totals of up to 12 inches (30 centimeters), with isolated pockets of 15 inches (38 centimeters).”

Storm Barry is expected “to continue weakening and become a tropical depression Sunday, moving over Arkansas on Sunday night and Monday.”

However, forecasts also showed the storm heading to Chicago. This could be a potential cause for concern if it swells the Mississipi River basin.

Ahead of Storm Barry, there were fears that the storm might devastate the city of New Orleans like Hurricane Katrina did in 2005 but everything looks to be going better than expected. However, the National Weather Service still said that “rain in the forecast could still cause life-threatening flooding.”

Check out some scenes below from New Orleans and other parts of Louisiana.

(Photo credit: AP Images via Instagram)

As mandatory evacuations were ordered last Thursday ahead of Storm Barry, residents of New Orleans tried to make their way to safety.

People have been sharing the disheartening images of their devastated households.

(Photo credit: AP Images via Instagram)

While Storm Barry wasn’t set to hit until Sunday, residents of New Orleans still felt the impact as the rains that fell last week were still strong enough to cause irreparable damage to residents’ homes.

Instagram users shared photos of the flooded streets of New Orleans.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Instagram user @the.viking.witch shared a photo of a flooded street in St. Roch, New Orleans with a car nearly submerged underwater. She captioned it, “we woke up to a severe storm with flash flooding and somewhere even a tornado [hit].”

New Orleans residents could be seen cleaning and preparing for the storm that was anticipated to come on Sunday.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

While Storm Barry was anticipated to hit today, folks also saw flooding earlier last week. For example, this photo shows some early flooding happening on Music Street and St. Claude. A man can be seen wearing rain boots, preparing for the storm that’s to come.

Vehicles in New Orleans were nearly submerged due to the flooding.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Freelance photographer based in New Orleans, Mary Margaret, shared an Instagram photo of the city streets flooded with water. Cars can be seen parked almost submerged fully in the water.

Volunteers and New Orleans residents also came together to make as many sandbags as they could.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

The community of St. Roch, New Orleans were coming together last week to prepare for Storm Barry. According to Instagram user @robert_savina, neighbors were getting ready by preparing sandbags in order to avoid homes, local businesses, and roads from flooding.

After filling up sandbags, volunteers and New Orlean’s residents were ready to distribute them to those affected.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

According to United Cajun Navy’s photo on Instagram, the disaster response group of volunteers were busy filling up sandbags for the local community and had filled a total of “7.5K and counting.”

Trash cans filled with water were also used as a way to stop cars from driving the flooded streets.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Folks living in Lower Garden District in New Orleans attempted to block streets using garbage cans filled with water. This was done in order to block the streets from incoming traffic to avoid causing any accidents, but the Instagram user who took this photo wrote that “people still tried to drive around them.”

Residents of New Orlean were using anything they could to stop the flooding from worsening.

(Photo credit:  @karonreese/ Instagram)

Instagram user @karonreese captured this lighthearted photo of local business owners attempting to use anything they could find to block flooding into their stores. Are those tortillas or pita bread?

Other New Orlean’s residents had a less panicked approach to the tropical storm.

(Photo credit: Paul Zansier/ Instagram)

Meanwhile… other New Orleans residents didn’t seem to feel as panicked on social media. One Instagram user Paul Zansier, shared a photo of his “commute to the office.”

Tornadoes also hit places in Louisiana and they could be seen from miles away.

Other folks on social media captured tornadoes that could be seen from miles away. One Instagram user captioned their photo, “Tornados and flooding on my way to work today in New Orleans! People parked and standing along the interstate brings me back to Katrina. An adventurous drive to work, to say the least.”

Flooded streets didn’t stop people from trying to get around the city––by bike.

(Photo credit: Austin Fischer/ Instagram)

Earlier last week, Instagram user and photographer Austin Fischer, shared a photo of the flooding in the French Quarter. “The flooding in New Orleans this morning.  I woke up to the sound of lightning crashing across the sky and water gurgling under the door into our room, ran to move my car to a place where it wouldn’t flood, and went out to document the flooding in the French Quarter,” he wrote in his caption. (Photo credit: Instagram)

Residential neighborhoods were looking less like neighborhoods and more like swamps due to flooding.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Another user on Instagram shared what looks like a residential street completely flooded.

Here is hoping everyone in the city of New Orleans and Louisiana experiences a safe and swift recovery.

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Uplifting News: Mexican Man Used His Home to Shelter 300 Dogs From Hurricane Delta

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Uplifting News: Mexican Man Used His Home to Shelter 300 Dogs From Hurricane Delta

Photo: Tierra de Animales/Facebook

In some uplifting news, a Mexican man has gone viral for housing stray dogs in need of shelter before Hurricane Delta hit the Yucatan peninsula in early October. Ricardo Pimentel of Cancun, Mexico, wrote on Facebook that he had boarded up his home’s windows and was currently housing 300 rescue dogs before the storm hit.

As background, Hurricane Delta touched down in Cozumel and Cancun and was reported to have winds up to 110 mph. The storm caused power outages, fallen trees, and the destruction of buildings and businesses. Luckily, Pimentel decided to get creative when it came to protecting his helpless four-legged friends from the ravages of the outdoors.

Photo: tierradeanimales/Instagram

Pimentel already owns an animal sanctuary called Tierra de Animales, but he decided to open up his home to the homeless dogs. Naturally, he need all the help he could get to take care of the canine creatures. He took to his Facebook page to ask for donations.

“If I lived alone or nothing else with about 10 or 20 dogs, I would not worry much,” wrote Pimentel on his Facebook page. “But here are hundreds of animals and we can not afford to not have enough food stored.” According to Pimentel, he was worried about there being food shortages at the grocery stores in the aftermath of the unpredictable storm.

The post was accompanied by a a jaw-dropping photo of Pimentel surrounded by a sea of dogs packed into his home. The call-to-action quickly took off and Pimentel was soon receiving thousands of dollars in donations.

At first, Pimentel was distracted by the storm and wasn’t initially aware of how deeply he touched people. When he finally saw how people had rallied to support him and his sanctuary, he was humbled.

Photo: Tierra de Animales/Facebook

“Your support at this time has been invaluable, we deeply appreciate all your messages, calls, and shows of affection,” he wrote on Facebook. “Thank you on behalf of all the animals in the sanctuary!”

According to Pimentel, many of the dogs he’s rescued on his sanctuary have been saved from dog-fighting rings and abusive homes where they’ve been badly beaten. He founded Tierra de Animales around 20 years ago as a place where dogs and other animals (including cats, bunnies, and sheep) can be safe and live a good life.

He says that his animals have been adopted by homes in Mexico, Canada and the United States. He hopes that the attention that the rescue dogs got from his viral post will encourage people to adopt them.

“We would like to think that thanks to all this attention, somebody would like to be part of the story and say: ‘I adopted a dog saved from that famous Hurricane Delta,” he told The Associated Press.

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Hurricane Iota Slams Into Central America As Region Tries Recovering From Hurricane Eta

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Hurricane Iota Slams Into Central America As Region Tries Recovering From Hurricane Eta

INTI OCON / AFP via Getty Images

Update November 19, 2020

As Central America works to recover from Hurricane Eta, the region was devastated again by Hurricane Iota. Hurricanes of this strength this late in the season are extremely rare. The death toll is coming in from the storm battered region.

Nicaragua and other Central American countries are reeling from a second massive storm.

More than 40 deaths have already been reported from Hurricane Iota. Hurricane Eta killed 189 people across several countries in Central America. Iota made landfall in Nicaragua as a stronger storm than Eta, which also made landfall in Nicaragua. Much like Eta, Iotas has triggered landslides in the region. The devastation left by the two storms is in the billions as rescues are currently underway to find hundreds of missing people.

“I think you’re going to be seeing an increase in migration month after month after month because of the compounding nature of this,” Giovanni Bassu regional representative for Central America for the UN refugee agency (UNHCR), told Reuters.

Update November 6, 2020

Hurricane Eta slammed into Nicaragua as a Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 140 mph. It quickly dropped to a Category 2 but continued to bring devastating rains to the rest of Central America for days. About 50 people in Central America have died.

Central America is reeling from the devastating impact of Hurricane Eta.

Hurricane Eta made landfall Nov. 3 as a Category 4 storm. Millions of Central Americans were in the path of the storm that brought devastating winds and rains. Landslides throughout the area have resulted in dozens of deaths and the rain has left tremendous flooding from Panama to Guatemala.

The storm has now shifted and is passing over Cuba before hitting Florida Monday. The storm is bringing similarly devastating floods to the Caribbean island.

There are ways to keep helping the victims of Hurricane Eta.

Several NGOs and humanitarian organizations are already taking donations to help those affected by the storm. If you would like to help, there is also a GoFundMe raising money for the Ruth Paz Foundation. You can also donate to Food For The Poor, which is sending aid to Hondurans affected by the storm.

The recent hurricane season has been intense and filled with powerful storm. The latest storm to make landfall is Hurricane Eta. The story made landfall in Nicaragua as a Category 5 hurricane bringin devastating winds and rain.

A Category 4 hurricane made landfall in Nicaragua as the U.S. presidential election was fully underway.

Hurricanes this late in the year are very rare. More rare is the intensity the storm develop so close to shore. Hurricane season in the Atlantic is June to November but 2020 has been a very active season. There have been 12 named hurricanes, five of which were Category 3 and above.

Images of Hurrcane Eta show a storm rapidly intensifying right before making landfall.

The hurricane has sustained winds of 140 mph when it made landfall and has dropped since. Eta is currently a Category 2 hurricane and is hovering over Central America bring more wind and rain damage. Honduras, Guatemala, and Belize are all feeling the storm as it slowly makes its way through Central America.

Eta is the third major hurricane since October.

Part of Nicaragua’s coastline experienced 21-foot storm surges as the country braced for the storm. Hurricane warnings covered 150 miles of Nicaragua’s coastline. More than 1 million people were affected by the the storm that is expected to make its way to Florida on Monday as a tropical storm.

Some Twitter users have been able to share some of the damage being done.

The storm started to create flooding and wind damage before making landfall. The storm was so strong before landfall that various countries were feeling the effects as it moved through the Caribbean.

If you want to help those affected, you can start with the American Red Cross.

The American Red Cross is already mobilizing to help the people of Central America. We will update you as more organizations start efforts to help Central America recover from this hurricane in the midst of a pandemic.

READ: Mexican Couple Hailed As Heroes For Saving 10 Dogs From Flooding Caused By Hurricane Hanna

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