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Victims Of Hurricane Barry Are Sharing Devastating Photos Of The Aftermath And Experts Are Calling This “The New Normal”

Tropical Storm Barry has officially made its way to New Orleans. As of this morning, it has been reported that Storm Barry has dumped rain slowly as it sweeps inland through Gulf Coast states. There is currently a flash flood watch set in place in Southeastern Louisiana active for the next 6 hours, according to the National Weather Service.

While it appears that it has spared New Orleans a direct hit, others in the state fear for their safety as Storm Barry continues to cause flooding, tornadoes and power outages.

On Wednesday, July 10, preliminary storm swamped New Orleans streets and affected traffic in the city significantly. Tropical Storm Barry had also been categorized a Category 1 hurricane but then weakened to a tropical storm.

According to poweroutage.us., about 125,00 customers in Louisiana and 6,800 customers in Mississipi are without power as of today.

According to AP News, “forecasters warned of a continued threat of storm surge and heavy rains as the center of the storm trudged inland and rain bands along its back half moved onshore. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Sunday parts of south-central Louisiana could still have rainfall totals of up to 12 inches (30 centimeters), with isolated pockets of 15 inches (38 centimeters).”

Storm Barry is expected “to continue weakening and become a tropical depression Sunday, moving over Arkansas on Sunday night and Monday.”

However, forecasts also showed the storm heading to Chicago. This could be a potential cause for concern if it swells the Mississipi River basin.

Ahead of Storm Barry, there were fears that the storm might devastate the city of New Orleans like Hurricane Katrina did in 2005 but everything looks to be going better than expected. However, the National Weather Service still said that “rain in the forecast could still cause life-threatening flooding.”

Check out some scenes below from New Orleans and other parts of Louisiana.

(Photo credit: AP Images via Instagram)

As mandatory evacuations were ordered last Thursday ahead of Storm Barry, residents of New Orleans tried to make their way to safety.

People have been sharing the disheartening images of their devastated households.

(Photo credit: AP Images via Instagram)

While Storm Barry wasn’t set to hit until Sunday, residents of New Orleans still felt the impact as the rains that fell last week were still strong enough to cause irreparable damage to residents’ homes.

Instagram users shared photos of the flooded streets of New Orleans.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Instagram user @the.viking.witch shared a photo of a flooded street in St. Roch, New Orleans with a car nearly submerged underwater. She captioned it, “we woke up to a severe storm with flash flooding and somewhere even a tornado [hit].”

New Orleans residents could be seen cleaning and preparing for the storm that was anticipated to come on Sunday.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

While Storm Barry was anticipated to hit today, folks also saw flooding earlier last week. For example, this photo shows some early flooding happening on Music Street and St. Claude. A man can be seen wearing rain boots, preparing for the storm that’s to come.

Vehicles in New Orleans were nearly submerged due to the flooding.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Freelance photographer based in New Orleans, Mary Margaret, shared an Instagram photo of the city streets flooded with water. Cars can be seen parked almost submerged fully in the water.

Volunteers and New Orleans residents also came together to make as many sandbags as they could.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

The community of St. Roch, New Orleans were coming together last week to prepare for Storm Barry. According to Instagram user @robert_savina, neighbors were getting ready by preparing sandbags in order to avoid homes, local businesses, and roads from flooding.

After filling up sandbags, volunteers and New Orlean’s residents were ready to distribute them to those affected.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

According to United Cajun Navy’s photo on Instagram, the disaster response group of volunteers were busy filling up sandbags for the local community and had filled a total of “7.5K and counting.”

Trash cans filled with water were also used as a way to stop cars from driving the flooded streets.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Folks living in Lower Garden District in New Orleans attempted to block streets using garbage cans filled with water. This was done in order to block the streets from incoming traffic to avoid causing any accidents, but the Instagram user who took this photo wrote that “people still tried to drive around them.”

Residents of New Orlean were using anything they could to stop the flooding from worsening.

(Photo credit:  @karonreese/ Instagram)

Instagram user @karonreese captured this lighthearted photo of local business owners attempting to use anything they could find to block flooding into their stores. Are those tortillas or pita bread?

Other New Orlean’s residents had a less panicked approach to the tropical storm.

(Photo credit: Paul Zansier/ Instagram)

Meanwhile… other New Orleans residents didn’t seem to feel as panicked on social media. One Instagram user Paul Zansier, shared a photo of his “commute to the office.”

Tornadoes also hit places in Louisiana and they could be seen from miles away.

Other folks on social media captured tornadoes that could be seen from miles away. One Instagram user captioned their photo, “Tornados and flooding on my way to work today in New Orleans! People parked and standing along the interstate brings me back to Katrina. An adventurous drive to work, to say the least.”

Flooded streets didn’t stop people from trying to get around the city––by bike.

(Photo credit: Austin Fischer/ Instagram)

Earlier last week, Instagram user and photographer Austin Fischer, shared a photo of the flooding in the French Quarter. “The flooding in New Orleans this morning.  I woke up to the sound of lightning crashing across the sky and water gurgling under the door into our room, ran to move my car to a place where it wouldn’t flood, and went out to document the flooding in the French Quarter,” he wrote in his caption. (Photo credit: Instagram)

Residential neighborhoods were looking less like neighborhoods and more like swamps due to flooding.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Another user on Instagram shared what looks like a residential street completely flooded.

Here is hoping everyone in the city of New Orleans and Louisiana experiences a safe and swift recovery.

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Texas Mother Loses Three Children And Their Grandmother To A Fire They Made While Attempting To Stay Warm Amidst Power Outages

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Texas Mother Loses Three Children And Their Grandmother To A Fire They Made While Attempting To Stay Warm Amidst Power Outages

The consequences of the widespread power outages in Texas have been beyond devastating to the state who has endured unrelenting winter weather made worse by an inferior infrastructure. Power and water outages have raged across the state last week as a result of an unusual deep freeze that has pushed many into survival mode.

Sadly, while Texas is beginning to receive relief, the Nguyen family has been faced with the unimaginable.

Jackie Pham Nguyen is the only survivor of a house fire that killed her three children and grandmother.

Nguyen was with her three children in their home in the Houston suburb of Sugar Land, Texas when the power went out at her mother Loan Le’s house. That Monday, Nguyen welcomed her mother into her home, located just five miles away, and where she and her children Olivia, 11, Edison, 8, and Colette, 5, still had power.

“We thought we were really lucky because we still had power until the early evening,” Nguyen said in an interview with CNN. After losing power just a few hours later, Nguyen says she and her family members settled down, lit their fireplace, and played board and card games. When 9:30 p.m. rolled around, everyone headed to sleep.

“Tucked my kids into bed and really the next thing I know I’m in the hospital,” Nguyen told CNN. “A few hours later the fireman and police officer came and said that no one else made it.”

Nguyen says she has little recollection of what happened but remembers being unable to get upstairs to her children’s bedrooms.

Nguyen’s room, which was located on her first floor where her bedroom is and yelled for her kids. “I was just standing there screaming and screaming and screaming their names hoping they would come out of their rooms and basically jump over so that we could get out,” she explained. “I just remember feeling like it was so dark and I can still kind of hear everything crackling around me.”

Coco, Edison and Olivia Nguyen all died in the fire.

Nguyen said she doesn’t remember much more of what happened but Doug Adolph, a spokesperson for the city of Sugar Land, told CNN that she “had to be physically restrained from running back into the house.”

According to Adolph, Nguyen’s neighborhood was without power for at least eight hours. The fire department arrived around 2 a.m. Tuesday and it took nearly an hour to get the fire fully under control.

“The family had posted on social media that they were attempting to stay warm by using a fireplace inside the home,” Adolph said, adding that the cause of the fire has not yet been determined and may never be. “We can’t say for sure that was the cause of the fire. We just don’t know yet,” he explained. “It’s possible that the investigation may never identify an exact cause.”

Nguyen suffered burns on her hands, but explained in an interview that the loss of her children and her mother is devastating

“My heart is broken,” she explained to CNN. “I’m never gonna be the same… I’m in this crisis tactical mode now and I’m just really focused on all these final arrangements because this is the last sort of thing I’m going to do for my kids.”

Speaking about her children, Nguyen describes them as having big personalities and hearts.

“My kids were such phenomenal, amazing, little badass humans,” she said of her children. “Colette is just a little firecracker and she has so much charisma… she also, as a 5-year-old, had that level of confidence. She was never afraid, totally unapologetic, not intimidated.”

“Obviously I mourn losing them,” Nguyen told CNN. “But I feel like it’s honestly a tragic loss for the world that these kids don’t get to like live up to their potential and contribute to society in the way that they could have.”

A GoFundMe page for the family has already brought in $342,387 in donations. Nguyen says she hopes to use the money to build an organization or foundation.

“I want to do something lasting for them,” Nguyen said. “I really want to be thoughtful about it because I want it to be lasting and meaningful. … I owe it to everybody’s support and their intentions to not be hasty about how those resources are used.”

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Uplifting News: Mexican Man Used His Home to Shelter 300 Dogs From Hurricane Delta

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Uplifting News: Mexican Man Used His Home to Shelter 300 Dogs From Hurricane Delta

Photo: Tierra de Animales/Facebook

In some uplifting news, a Mexican man has gone viral for housing stray dogs in need of shelter before Hurricane Delta hit the Yucatan peninsula in early October. Ricardo Pimentel of Cancun, Mexico, wrote on Facebook that he had boarded up his home’s windows and was currently housing 300 rescue dogs before the storm hit.

As background, Hurricane Delta touched down in Cozumel and Cancun and was reported to have winds up to 110 mph. The storm caused power outages, fallen trees, and the destruction of buildings and businesses. Luckily, Pimentel decided to get creative when it came to protecting his helpless four-legged friends from the ravages of the outdoors.

Photo: tierradeanimales/Instagram

Pimentel already owns an animal sanctuary called Tierra de Animales, but he decided to open up his home to the homeless dogs. Naturally, he need all the help he could get to take care of the canine creatures. He took to his Facebook page to ask for donations.

“If I lived alone or nothing else with about 10 or 20 dogs, I would not worry much,” wrote Pimentel on his Facebook page. “But here are hundreds of animals and we can not afford to not have enough food stored.” According to Pimentel, he was worried about there being food shortages at the grocery stores in the aftermath of the unpredictable storm.

The post was accompanied by a a jaw-dropping photo of Pimentel surrounded by a sea of dogs packed into his home. The call-to-action quickly took off and Pimentel was soon receiving thousands of dollars in donations.

At first, Pimentel was distracted by the storm and wasn’t initially aware of how deeply he touched people. When he finally saw how people had rallied to support him and his sanctuary, he was humbled.

Photo: Tierra de Animales/Facebook

“Your support at this time has been invaluable, we deeply appreciate all your messages, calls, and shows of affection,” he wrote on Facebook. “Thank you on behalf of all the animals in the sanctuary!”

According to Pimentel, many of the dogs he’s rescued on his sanctuary have been saved from dog-fighting rings and abusive homes where they’ve been badly beaten. He founded Tierra de Animales around 20 years ago as a place where dogs and other animals (including cats, bunnies, and sheep) can be safe and live a good life.

He says that his animals have been adopted by homes in Mexico, Canada and the United States. He hopes that the attention that the rescue dogs got from his viral post will encourage people to adopt them.

“We would like to think that thanks to all this attention, somebody would like to be part of the story and say: ‘I adopted a dog saved from that famous Hurricane Delta,” he told The Associated Press.

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