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Victims Of Hurricane Barry Are Sharing Devastating Photos Of The Aftermath And Experts Are Calling This “The New Normal”

Tropical Storm Barry has officially made its way to New Orleans. As of this morning, it has been reported that Storm Barry has dumped rain slowly as it sweeps inland through Gulf Coast states. There is currently a flash flood watch set in place in Southeastern Louisiana active for the next 6 hours, according to the National Weather Service.

While it appears that it has spared New Orleans a direct hit, others in the state fear for their safety as Storm Barry continues to cause flooding, tornadoes and power outages.

On Wednesday, July 10, preliminary storm swamped New Orleans streets and affected traffic in the city significantly. Tropical Storm Barry had also been categorized a Category 1 hurricane but then weakened to a tropical storm.

According to poweroutage.us., about 125,00 customers in Louisiana and 6,800 customers in Mississipi are without power as of today.

According to AP News, “forecasters warned of a continued threat of storm surge and heavy rains as the center of the storm trudged inland and rain bands along its back half moved onshore. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Sunday parts of south-central Louisiana could still have rainfall totals of up to 12 inches (30 centimeters), with isolated pockets of 15 inches (38 centimeters).”

Storm Barry is expected “to continue weakening and become a tropical depression Sunday, moving over Arkansas on Sunday night and Monday.”

However, forecasts also showed the storm heading to Chicago. This could be a potential cause for concern if it swells the Mississipi River basin.

Ahead of Storm Barry, there were fears that the storm might devastate the city of New Orleans like Hurricane Katrina did in 2005 but everything looks to be going better than expected. However, the National Weather Service still said that “rain in the forecast could still cause life-threatening flooding.”

Check out some scenes below from New Orleans and other parts of Louisiana.

(Photo credit: AP Images via Instagram)

As mandatory evacuations were ordered last Thursday ahead of Storm Barry, residents of New Orleans tried to make their way to safety.

People have been sharing the disheartening images of their devastated households.

(Photo credit: AP Images via Instagram)

While Storm Barry wasn’t set to hit until Sunday, residents of New Orleans still felt the impact as the rains that fell last week were still strong enough to cause irreparable damage to residents’ homes.

Instagram users shared photos of the flooded streets of New Orleans.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Instagram user @the.viking.witch shared a photo of a flooded street in St. Roch, New Orleans with a car nearly submerged underwater. She captioned it, “we woke up to a severe storm with flash flooding and somewhere even a tornado [hit].”

New Orleans residents could be seen cleaning and preparing for the storm that was anticipated to come on Sunday.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

While Storm Barry was anticipated to hit today, folks also saw flooding earlier last week. For example, this photo shows some early flooding happening on Music Street and St. Claude. A man can be seen wearing rain boots, preparing for the storm that’s to come.

Vehicles in New Orleans were nearly submerged due to the flooding.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Freelance photographer based in New Orleans, Mary Margaret, shared an Instagram photo of the city streets flooded with water. Cars can be seen parked almost submerged fully in the water.

Volunteers and New Orleans residents also came together to make as many sandbags as they could.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

The community of St. Roch, New Orleans were coming together last week to prepare for Storm Barry. According to Instagram user @robert_savina, neighbors were getting ready by preparing sandbags in order to avoid homes, local businesses, and roads from flooding.

After filling up sandbags, volunteers and New Orlean’s residents were ready to distribute them to those affected.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

According to United Cajun Navy’s photo on Instagram, the disaster response group of volunteers were busy filling up sandbags for the local community and had filled a total of “7.5K and counting.”

Trash cans filled with water were also used as a way to stop cars from driving the flooded streets.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Folks living in Lower Garden District in New Orleans attempted to block streets using garbage cans filled with water. This was done in order to block the streets from incoming traffic to avoid causing any accidents, but the Instagram user who took this photo wrote that “people still tried to drive around them.”

Residents of New Orlean were using anything they could to stop the flooding from worsening.

(Photo credit:  @karonreese/ Instagram)

Instagram user @karonreese captured this lighthearted photo of local business owners attempting to use anything they could find to block flooding into their stores. Are those tortillas or pita bread?

Other New Orlean’s residents had a less panicked approach to the tropical storm.

(Photo credit: Paul Zansier/ Instagram)

Meanwhile… other New Orleans residents didn’t seem to feel as panicked on social media. One Instagram user Paul Zansier, shared a photo of his “commute to the office.”

Tornadoes also hit places in Louisiana and they could be seen from miles away.

Other folks on social media captured tornadoes that could be seen from miles away. One Instagram user captioned their photo, “Tornados and flooding on my way to work today in New Orleans! People parked and standing along the interstate brings me back to Katrina. An adventurous drive to work, to say the least.”

Flooded streets didn’t stop people from trying to get around the city––by bike.

(Photo credit: Austin Fischer/ Instagram)

Earlier last week, Instagram user and photographer Austin Fischer, shared a photo of the flooding in the French Quarter. “The flooding in New Orleans this morning.  I woke up to the sound of lightning crashing across the sky and water gurgling under the door into our room, ran to move my car to a place where it wouldn’t flood, and went out to document the flooding in the French Quarter,” he wrote in his caption. (Photo credit: Instagram)

Residential neighborhoods were looking less like neighborhoods and more like swamps due to flooding.

(Photo credit: Instagram)

Another user on Instagram shared what looks like a residential street completely flooded.

Here is hoping everyone in the city of New Orleans and Louisiana experiences a safe and swift recovery.

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From Puerto Rico To New York, Hurricane Isaías Has Devastated Millions

Entertainment

From Puerto Rico To New York, Hurricane Isaías Has Devastated Millions

Hurricane Isaías is just one hurricane of an expectedly active season. The storm-battered the Caribbean islands before making its way to the Carolinas and up the east coast. The storm has killed 5 people and we are still at the beginning of hurricane season.

Tropical Storm Isaías slammed into Puerto Rico on July 31.

The storm knocked out power to thousands of Puerto Ricans as the storm approached. Dozens had to be rescued from the area of Mayaguez as flooding devastated the area. José Ortiz, the CEO of the state-run power company resigned after the power outages rocked the island still reeling from hurricanes and earthquakes.

The storm grew to a category 1 hurricane as it battered the Bahamas.

The storm killed at least one person in the Bahamas and weakened to a tropical storm as it hit the island. The storm triggered a series of warning along the Florida coastline from Boca Raton to Brevard county. The storm ravaged parts of the Bahamas with winds up to 80 miles per hour.

Florida was spared much of the storm as it changed course.

Florida, which is already grappling with a terrifyingly out of control Covid outbreak, was spared a direct hit from Hurricane Isaías. The storm turned north and brushed along Florida’s eastern coastline. The storm was headed directly to the Carolinas.

North and South Carolina braced for a direct hit from the storm as it made its way north.

The storm made landfall with 85 mile-per-hour winds in the Carolinas bring heavy winds and flooding. Millions of people lost power as the storm lashed the east coast for two days while making its way up to New York. Flooding was particularly devastating in Pennsylvania as the storm forced millions sin to some form of flood warning.

The storm arrived in New York on August 4 and packed a punch.

Tropical Storm Isaías devastated the tri-state region. Millions are without power in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut after the storm destroyed homes, power lines, and cars.

Officials for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are warning the east coast of a more active hurricane season. After Isaías, the season could bring 10 more hurricanes with potentially devastating effects. As the season picks up, it is important to be prepared. Makes sure you have an emergency plan and an emergency kit.

For more information, check out the National Weather Service.

READ: Hurricane Hanna Battered Texas But Did It Actually Knock Over Part Of Trump’s Border Wall?

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Drew Brees Apologizes After Making Statement Criticizing Protesting For Racial Justice

Entertainment

Drew Brees Apologizes After Making Statement Criticizing Protesting For Racial Justice

Sean Gardner / Getty Images

Thousands of people have been protesting in the streets of major U.S. cities for days demanding justice after George Floyd was killed. People are demanding a change to police reform and the Black Lives Matter movement is at the center of that fight.

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees is not a fan of kneeling in protest.

In an interview with Yahoo! Business, Brees spoke on the peaceful kneeling protests. While thousands of people continue to march and protest to demand justice, Brees gave a sound bite that has not done him any favors.

“I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country,” Brees said in the interview. “And is everything right with our country right now? No. It’s not. We still have a long way to go. But I think what you do by standing there and showing respect to the flag with your hand over your heart, is it shows unity. It shows that we are all in this together. We can all do better. And that we are all part of the solution.”

Brees seems to have missed why protesters were kneeling during the national anthem.

ESPN commentator Michael Wilbon took issue with Brees’s statement for calling into question someone’s patriotism if they kneel during the national anthem.

“I believe the apology. I believe it was as sincere as and as heartfelt as he could possibly be and it reflects that,” Wilbon said in an interview. “That’s not my point today and I’m angry today, Tony. Even Drew Brees in his apology, he doesn’t address what it was that ticked off so many people, including me, which is essentially the questioning of anybody, and let’s say that anybody in this case if black people, who want to take a knee and have a protest during the national anthem when the flag is raised at sporting events.”

Brees apologized on Instagram after receiving backlash for his comments.

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I would like to apologize to my friends, teammates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday. In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused. In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country. They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character. This is where I stand: I stand with the black community in the fight against systemic racial injustice and police brutality and support the creation of real policy change that will make a difference. I condemn the years of oppression that have taken place throughout our black communities and still exists today. I acknowledge that we as Americans, including myself, have not done enough to fight for that equality or to truly understand the struggles and plight of the black community. I recognize that I am part of the solution and can be a leader for the black community in this movement. I will never know what it’s like to be a black man or raise black children in America but I will work every day to put myself in those shoes and fight for what is right. I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy. I am sick about the way my comments were perceived yesterday, but I take full responsibility and accountability. I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening…and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen. For that, I am very sorry and I ask your forgiveness.

A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on

His apology has been received with mixed reviews. Some people have come to Brees’s support claiming his message has been misunderstood. Others, like Wilbon see the apology as a half-apology coming from a need to preserve a public image, not a genuine reflection on his actions.

One of the people to have forgiven Brees is teammate Michael Thomas.

Michael Thomas is a wide receiver for the New Orleans Saints and he was one of the first to come to Brees’s defense after he issued his apology. Several other teammates came to his defense and all of them expressed both a disappointment at Brees’s insensitive comments and a willingness to forgive him after see his apology and feeling it genuine.

What do you think about Brees’s comments?

READ: White Teens Are Mocking The George Floyd Killing On Social Media And This Is Why We Need #BlackLivesMatter

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