Things That Matter

There’s A Group In Colombia Throwing Virtual House Parties With Amazing DJ’s And Supporting Vulnerable Communities In The Process

With the pandemic forcing millions of us into lockdown and self-isolation, we’ve had to get pretty creative when it comes to socializing. One consequence of the lockdown has been the total shutdown of bars and clubs.

But let’s be real: the desire to perrear hasn’t gone anywhere.

So that’s where digital dance parties come to the rescue. And one group is creating super fun virtual parties with serious DJs spinning everything from EDM to reggaetón, while also supporting at-risk communities.

Dona En Casa is throwing virtual dance parties and supporting local communities with every peso they raise.

The Coronavirus pandemic may have spurred the group into action, but Dona En Casa is working on solving issues that existed long before Covid-19 threatened communities around the world.

Poverty, homelessness, lack of medical care and education – these issues all existed long before the virus hit but imagine how much worse they have become for impoverished communities in Latin America… Things have only gotten worse.

So, Dona En Casa decided to step up and try and do something about it while creating a platform for others to give back and have fun doing so – all from the safety and comfort of their own home. The group is also creating a fun space for people to escape the daily reminder of self-isolation and quarantine with lineups featuring amazing DJs.

Dona En Casa has helped frontline medical workers and has plans to help even more organizations – with your support.

Credit: donaencasa / Instagram

The group started off raising money for families in need of food assistance – and so far, the Dona En Casa and its partygoers have helped feed 100 families. But the group has also helped raise money to buy face masks and PPE for healthcare workers stationed in remote parts of Colombia that don’t have easy access to necessary equipment.

In an interview with Felipe Galvis, a founder of Done En Casa, he said the group is also looking to expand its giving programs by partnering with other organizations – including a dog shelter and a sanctuary for monkeys trafficked in the wildlife trade.

OK – but a digital dance party? What does that even look like…?

Credit: donaencasa / Instagram

Trust me, I had this question, too. But it actually sounds amazing! I mean basically you get to party from the comfort of your home, get dressed up or stay as dressed down as you want, make your own favorite beverage, and hang out with tons of other like-minded people.

The party takes place on Zoom and typically goes for two hours – but Galvis noted that their first party stretched on for four hours because people were having such a good time.

And this isn’t like something you’ll just stream while doing something on the side: Galvis said that at least 70% of people are really active and engaged – there’s tons of chatting, dance challenges, games, and even private chatting going. Can we expect a Done En Casa wedding some day?

Galvis pointed out that the last thing he expected to do in a quarantine was meet new people, but thanks to these parties that’s exactly what’s happened. Together, they’re building a community and in the process supporting vulnerable groups and helping out the entertainment industry and DJs along the way.

Mitú is joining Dona En Casa for two digital fiestas that will benefit TECHO – a major NGO across Latin America.

Credit: us.techo.org

This Friday and Saturday (May 22/23), Mitú is joining Dona En Casa for two crazy fiestas that will take place to benefit TECHO – a Latin American organization that provides support to communities in need.

TECHO is an organization that Dona En Casa co-founder Felipe Galvis holds close to his heart. As a former volunteer, he has seen the impact the organization makes. They provide food assistance, medical aide, supplemental education such as English classes, and they help small businesses with microcredits and coaching. The organization also constructs emergency housing for families who need them most.

You can join in on the parties with a donation that will 100% benefit the organization. The group is asking for a $9 USD donation – since with $9 USD they can feed a family for 10 days. And with your $9 donation you get access to both parties on Friday and Saturday.

Colombia has had a pretty strict response to the Coronavirus pandemic leaving many people with increased anxiety and loneliness.

Credit: donaencasa / Instagram

As soon as it became clear that Coronavirus was spreading across Latin America, Colombia sealed off its borders – including banning its own citizens from returning to Colombia. In fact, the country has been home to some of the strictest measures against the pandemic in Latin America. While this has had a positive effect at combating the outbreak, it’s also led to increased anxiety and loneliness among those who aren’t even allowed to leave their homes to visit family.

The Dona En Casa initiative is a win-win situation that helps people in need while also letting others dance and hang out in a socially distanced digital platform. If you’re interested in signing up for the event, check it out here.

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The President Of Mexico Has Tested Positive For Covid-19 After A Year Of Downplaying The Virus

Things That Matter

The President Of Mexico Has Tested Positive For Covid-19 After A Year Of Downplaying The Virus

Hector Villas / Getty Images

Since the very beginning of the worldwide Coronavirus pandemic, Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) has largely downplayed the severity of the crisis. Despite record-setting deaths across Mexico, the president continued to hold large rallies, rarely uses face masks and continues to be very hands on with his supporters. Many of his detractors grouped him in with Donald Trump and Brazil’s Jaír Bolsonaro in his poor response to the pandemic.

Mexico’s President AMLO has tested positive for Covid-19 and is experiencing light symptoms.

In a tweet on Sunday evening, AMLO revealed that he had tested positive for the Covid-19 virus. From his official Twitter account, he said his symptoms were mild and that he was receiving medical treatment.

“I regret to inform you that I have contracted Covid-19. The symptoms are mild, but I am already receiving medical treatment. As always, I am optimistic. We will move forward,” Lopez Obrador wrote.

Despite his diagnosis, the president plans to continue business as usual. He plans to continue with his duties from the Palacio Nacional, which include conducting a planned phone call with Russian President Vladimir Putin on the topic of Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine Monday. He added on Twitter, that “I will be conducting all public affairs from the National Palace. For example, tomorrow I will take a call from President Vladimir Putin, because irrespective of friendly relationships, there is a possibility that they will send us the Sputnik V vaccine.”

AMLO has taken a very hands off approach to his country’s response to the Coronavirus pandemic.

AMLO, 67-years-old, has rarely been seen wearing a mask and continued to travel extensively across the country aboard commercial flights – putting both his health and those around him at risk.

He has also resisted locking down the economy, noting the devastating effect it would have on so many Mexicans who live day to day. And because of that, Mexico has one of the highest death rates in the world. Early in the pandemic, asked how he was protecting Mexico, AMLO removed two religious amulets from his wallet and proudly showed them off.

“The protective shield is the ‘Get thee behind me, Satan,’” AMLO said, reading off the inscription on the amulet, “Stop, enemy, for the Heart of Jesus is with me.”

In November, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, head of the World Health Organization, urged Mexico’s leaders be serious about the coronavirus and set examples for its citizens, saying that “Mexico is in bad shape” with the pandemic.

Meanwhile, Mexico continues to experience the worst effects yet of the global health crisis.

Credit: Ismael Rosas / Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Thanks to a lack of national leadership, Mexico is one of the 17 countries that has reported more than one million cases of Covid-19. Since early October, newly confirmed cases and deaths have been reaching record levels, with recent daily numbers some of the highest since the beginning the pandemic.

According to Johns Hopkins University, Mexico has recorded at least 1,752,347 Covid-19 cases and 149,084 people have died from the virus in the country.

In hardest-hit Mexico City, nearly 30 public hospitals report they have reached 100% percent capacity, and many others are approaching that mark. The city’s Mayor, Claudia Sheinbaum, has urged residents to not go out unless absolutely necessary. In December, Mexico City and the state of Mexico were placed into “red level,” the highest measure on the country’s stoplight alert system for Covid-19 restrictions. The tighter measures included the closure of indoor dining, with only essential sectors like transport, energy, health and construction remaining open.

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Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Entertainment

Selena Gomez Releases New Spanish-Language Single ‘De Una Vez’ and Teases Full Spanish Album: ‘I’m Targeting My Heritage’

Photo via selenagomez/Instagram

Good news, Selenators! Word on the street is that Selena Gomez will soon be dropping her first-ever Spanish language album. The rumors started after Gomez dropped a surprising (and beautiful!) new Spanish-language single, “De Una Vez”.

Soon after the single dropped, rumors of a full Spanish-language studio album began to swirl when murals promoting “De Una Vez” and a yet-unreleased single “Baila Conmigo” popped up across, Mexico.

To make matters even better, Selena already dropped “De Una Vez”‘s music video.

The lush and imaginative video has been garnering praise for its inclusion of Latin American visuals and symbols. Gomez hired Tania Verduzco and Adrian Perez to direct her video–a husband and wife team who hail from Mexico and Spain, respectively and go by the moniker Los Pérez.

Of hiring Spanish speakers to direct her video, Gomez revealed to Vogue online that the decision was intentional. “If I was going to completely immerse myself into a project inspired by Latin culture, I wanted to work with native Spanish speaking creators,” she said.

And indeed, Verduzco and Perez tried to infuse as much Latin spirit into the video’s conception as possible.

“Magical realism has always been part of the Latin culture, whether it be in art or telenovelas,” Gomez told Vogue. “I wanted [to capture] that sense of a supernatural world.”

They accomplished this sense of magical realism by utilizing motifs from Mexican folk art, like Milagro, which is symbolized by the glowing heart that is beating within Gomez’s chest throughout the video.

“We wanted to play with powerful language and images. We designed the heart—we call it the Milagro in Mexican culture—and its light to be a metaphor for the healing throughout the story,” Verduzco told Vogue.

Selena Gomez fans are especially excited about this project because Gomez has long hinted at her desire to release a Spanish-language album.

Back in 2011, Gomez tweeted about her plans to eventually record an entire album in Spanish. “Can’t wait for y’all to hear the Spanish record;) it’s sounding so cool,” she wrote.

She retweeted the sentiment on Thursday with the comment: “I think it will be worth the wait”–which many fans took as confirmation that a full studio album is on its way.

It’s worth noting that Gomez has already dipped her toe into the Latin music scene with 2010’s “Un Año Sin Lluvia” and 2018’s DJ Snake, Ozuna and Cardi B collab, “Taki Taki”.

As for the difficulty of recording songs in a second language, Gomez said that it was a practice that came naturally.

“I actually think I sing better in Spanish. That was something I discovered,” she said in an interview for Apple Music. “It was a lot of work, and look, you cannot mispronounce anything. It is something that needed to be precise, and needed to be respected by the audience I’m going to release this for.”

She continued: “Of course I want everyone to enjoy the music, but I am targeting my fan base. I’m targeting my heritage, and I couldn’t be more excited.”

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