Things That Matter

There Is A Growing Database That Is Connecting Latinos With Culturally Competent Therapists

For many Latinos, mental health still carries a very real and very scary stigma. The statistics support this as there are an estimated 8.9 million Latino people in the U.S. that live with a diagnosable mental illness, but only 10 percent of Latinos with a mental health disorder seek mental health treatment. The disparity comes from several factors including lack of culturally competent therapists and high health care costs. Brandie Carlos knows firsthand about dealing with depression and the stigma Latinos sometimes face when seeking help for mental health issues. That was enough motivation for Carlos, a web designer, to create Therapy For Latinx, an online database that helps Latinos find mental health professionals in their own communities.

Therapy for Latinx is a website dedicated to helping Latinos find “culturally competent” therapists in their own communities.

Creator Brandie Carlos found herself lost in February 2017 when one of her best friends died by suicide. She was frustrated when she couldn’t find a therapist who spoke Spanish and understood her culturally.

“I tried seeking Latino therapy but nothing came up,” Carlos says. “It was when found out about a Black therapy database I thought to myself, ‘Why not a Latino version of this?'”

She put her website design skills to use and launched Therapy for Latinx this May. The website currently has over 65 Latino mental health practitioners in it’s directory and features a blog that highlights first-person stories of mental illness from a Latino perspective.

“I didn’t have a metal health or psychological background,” Carlos explains. “All I wanted was to focus on user friendliness when creating a website that would help people find these resources.”

Carlos argues that mental health needs to be talked about more, especially within Latino households.

According to the American Psychological Association, 50 percent of Latinos don’t return to a psychologist after the first session which may be due to the language and cultural barriers. Carlos says it also has to due with stigmas and taboos in the Latino household when seeking mental help.

“I personally grew up depressed and under a Catholic family where things like mental health and depression weren’t talked about,” Carlos says. “You are either called a ‘Loca’ or crazy when you express a need for self-care.”

About 1 percent of U.S. psychologist practitioners identify as Latino, which shows the lack of cultural competency one may find when seeking help. Additionally suicide rates among Latino girls (grades 9–12) are 50 percent higher than suicide rates among white girls of the same age group.

Therapy for Latinx is helping connect Latinos to mental health services they never knew existed.

Carlos hopes the website grows beyond just a database but a nationwide resource for minorities to find help and seek information on mental health. There are plans to start a mentorship program to help more people of color (POC) be involved in the industry to help their communities.

“Once I started working on making things more accessible, I realized this is about social justice as well,” Carlos said. “As Latinos we’re incredibly underserved and I want to see these new mentors serve POCs.”

According to Carlos, one community that is heavily underserved are undocumented immigrants. This community has faced psychological attacks because of their immigration status and the current immigration debate in the U.S.

“We’ve had many people ask for help concerning immigration and LGBTQ services,” Carlos says. “We are always trying to grow our voice and help these marginalized groups find resources.”

The website is just a start in addressing mental health and the beginning of a larger discussion when it comes to Latinos and their mental health.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Mental Health America

Therapy for Latinx is growing at a fast rate, Carlos says its Instagram has averaged around 1500 new users a month, and wants to spread its services beyond just a database. Carlos hopes to have health workshops throughout the country and has already began planning a mental health event in Los Angeles. While there is still a ways to go in having more Latino health professionals reach the number of Latinos in the U.S., Carlos sees the discussion of mental health growing into a bigger conversation.

“When you’ve grown up speaking Spanish, it’s part of your identity. When a therapist speaks your language it makes a huge difference,” Carlos says. “It means a lot of Latinos are going to thrive without these cultural barriers stopping them.”


READ: 20 Famous Latinos Who’ve Publicly Dealt With Mental Illness

Have you personally dealt with mental health issues?  Let us know by sharing your story in the comment section below!

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Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

Fierce

Women Are Sharing Why Gut Instincts Made Them Turn Down A Dream Job

FPG / Getty

We’re all familiar with the phrase “trust your gut.” Of course, while the ability to suss out a situation based on instinct might not always lead us down the easiest path, for the most part, many people believe that relying on our gut can help us get through even the hardest life experiences and oftentimes avoid them. In fact, according to research, the belief of trusting in one’s gut is upheld by over half of people living in the United States. But what about when your gut-instinct leads you away from something you might really want?

Recently, a post shared to Instagram about gut instinct caught our attention.

The post served as a reminder to us that its imperative to truly weigh what matters to you when considering a new job or promotion. Still, we couldn’t help but wonder what Latinas think. So we asked and got a whole heck of a lot of advice and answers.

Check them out below!

gverseukYessss! We need to be able to say no to a job with an organisation that we don’t think is right for us. However, this often isn’t an option for many of us, particularly womxn. 😩2d8 likesReply

meeze_82This is goals for me. To get my girls to where they can decline jobs offers becuase they’re smart and strong enough to know they can do better. 👏1d3 likesReply

theresalwayzplanzI took a job that paid more money but i didnt know what the work environment would be like. It was awesome making more money, but it was the first time i felt my mental health be in danger. I left. It was the best thing i did.1d2 likesReply

bellabelicenaAbsolutely! Prioritizing your mental wellness always comes first.♥️2dReply

jojajessI declined a job offer 2 wks ago during an interview. It was so awkward, but I was NOT feeling it. I flat out told her that I needed my job to contribute as much to me as I do to it.

“I ignored my gut for a job with a really significant pay increase in an upper management position. I regretted my decision the first few days I was there, the company culture was horrible, and the work hours were horrendous (11 hour days were seen as “normal”, you weren’t seen as a hard worker / dedicated employee unless you put in 70 hours or more.)” – TrifectaLoser

“I met a gentleman who said he always walks with the boss through the office. If the workers change their demeanor, for example stop smiling and talking and start looking busy, he won’t work there. Your thing looks similar, see how the employees interact and maybe even ask.” reidmrdotcom

“I may be stuck in my ways, but I won’t even go for an interview if I’m going to struggle commuting there, never mind moving to a new city etc just to take the job. But that said, definitely trust your gut.” –johnbarrymore2013

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J Balvin Is Opening Up About His Battle With Coronavirus And He Says This Was His Worst Symptom

Entertainment

J Balvin Is Opening Up About His Battle With Coronavirus And He Says This Was His Worst Symptom

JBalvin / Instagram

As more and more celebrities share their Covid-19 diagnoses, J Balvin is opening up about his intense fight against the virus. Not only did he suffer from the intense physical effects of Covid-19 infection, but he admits that he lost all hope because of it’s effect on his mental health.

The reggaetonero, who has long been open about his own struggles with mental health, confessed in an Instagram post that his anxiety came raging back amid his battle against Covid-19 -– causing him to lose all hope at one point.

J Balvin revealed that he lost all hope amid his battle against Covid-19.

Having been hit ‘hard’ by a Covid-19 infection, J Balvin says that he actually lost all hope as he fought back against the virus. Although the Colombian megastar did suffer from a particularly strong infection, Balvin revelas that it was his anxiety that had the biggest effect on him.

When he revealed he had contracted the virus, at the Premios Juventud, he said, “Right now I am just coming off COVID-19. They have been very difficult days, very complicated. Sometimes you think that it is not going to hit you but it got me and it got me very hard.”

Since that announcement, J Balvin has detailed his fight against the virus and it’s a reminder of how careful we all need to be. He confessed that suffering from the disease was one of the most complicated experiences of his life, and that it is a mistake for the rest of us to think of it as a game – because it’s very dangerous.

“It is one of the most difficult health experiences I have had in my life; you think it’s a joke because there is a lot of fake news,” he said. “I feel it’s almost killing me, fever of 40º C, chills, loss of smell, low oxygen, loss of taste, and fear of feeling that one of the worst nightmares of today is inside you. I had a very bad time,” he added.

Having long been open about his struggle with mental health, Balvin shared that anxiety hit him hard.

Credit: Global Citizen / Getty Images

J Balvin has long been open about his struggle with mental health. He’s one of the few Latino stars who is open about mental health issues and his openness has had a major impact on Latinos being able to speak about their own issues.

The singer is once again opening up about these issues as they came out in full force once again, as he battled Covid-19. For him, the days with the virus were complicated not only by the symptoms it causes, but also by the anxiety that came rushing to the surface once again.

With his heart in hand, he said: “I have suffered from anxiety and as a result of this event it became more potent, but I accept and face the aspects that affect my body and my mind and, I recognize that I am vulnerable and VERY fragile, before this and thousands of more situations.”

Balvin has previously been candid about his health — and in June penned a personal essay for PEOPLE, in which he opened up about his struggles with anxiety and depression. In the essay, the singer credited meditation with helping him overcome those struggles. In fact, Balvin said that the practice “saved my life.”

The reggaetonero gave a major shoutout to the medical workers who helped keep him – and so many others – safe.

Credit: J Balvin / Instagram

Although J Balvin suffered from an intense case of Covid-19, he has given several shoutouts to the medical team who helped make sure he was in good hands.

He uploaded a photo to his Instagram to show his immense gratitude to not only his doctor, but the tens of thousands of medical workers across the world who are working to protect and help those infected by the virus.

J Balvin explained that the photograph was taken by the doctor on a very critical day, in which he presented all the symptoms and in which they even thought of hospitalizing him. He goes on to say that he now considers these people who helped him as members of his family.

Speaking about the photo, he said “They are the ones who took care of me professionally, they are family. I remember this photo because at that precise moment, I had all the symptoms and I lost hope, to the level that they thought of hospitalizing me,” wrote the singer.

J Balvin is just one of many celebrities who have battled the virus.

Credit: Blake Whitaker / Getty Images

As beaches, restaurants, and even bars and clubs started to reopen, it was easy to forget that we are still in the midst of a global health crisis – one that continues to hit the Latino community, in particular, very hard. And stars, they really are just like us. Celebrities are also at risk of contracting Covid-19 and over the last few days, we’ve learned that several of Latin music’s biggest stars have in fact been infected with the virus.

As if a reminder that stars, they’re just like us, several of Latin music’s biggest celebrities have announced that they’ve tested positive for Covid-19. Karol G, Prince Royce, and Chiquita Rivera have all shared their positive diagnosis for the virus and are urging fans to stay home and use masks when they have to go out.

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