Things That Matter

This Taqueria Faces Severe Backlash After It Names Tacos Like ‘The Wall’, ‘Lock Her Up’ And ‘The Immigrant’

We’ve all heard the divisive and hateful rhetoric that’s come out of not only Trump’s mouth but, really, from pretty much the entire administration. From ‘the wall’ to ‘lock her up’ and ‘the immigrant’, never have so many words so quickly entered the mainstream lexicon.

And yea, many of those words don’t carry any hateful or racist meaning by themselves. But when taken in context, they have been used to belittle and straight up attack entire communities.

So when news broke out that a restaurant in New Mexico has plastered a whole bunch of these words all over their menu, many were left scratching their heads.

A restaurant in New Mexico with a menu full of foods bearing politically charged names is giving the internet something to taco ‘bout.

Credit: Urban Taqueria / Facebook

The Urban Taqueria, which recently opened in Albuquerque, offers customers a range of burritos boasting names like “Lock her Up” and “The Wall” as well as tacos that have been dubbed “Bad Hombre” and “The Immigrant.”

The owner of the eatery, Hanif Mohamed, denied he was trying to spark controversy with the menu names — seemingly inspired by President Trump’s rhetoric. Instead, Mohamed said he hoped it would prompt conversation during a particularly polarizing time in American history.

And with names like ‘Bad Hombre’, ‘The Wall’, and ‘The Immigrant’ we aren’t too surprised.

In an interview with Yahoo Lifestyle, Mohamed, a native of Kenya who immigrated to the US in 1992, said “When I created the menu two-and-half-years ago, we had the ban on Muslims. My kids asked me, ‘Are we American or Muslim?’” The menu, he decided, covered all subject matter.

The offerings are not meant to insult his customers, says Mohamed. In fact, he says they’re a “conversation starter” and educational by nature.

“Outsourced,” a taco with tandoori chicken, raita, tamarind salsa, alludes to the U.S. practice of outsourcing jobs to India, while “The Immigrant,” a vegan taco with organic green chile and fried potatoes, represents Irish refugees fleeing the Potato Famine in the 1800s.

The owner, an immigrant himself, claims that “99%” of people haven’t had any issue with his menu.

“Ninety-nine percent of the people who walk in, more than 99 percent, don’t seem to have an issue with it,” Hanif Mohamed, owner of Urban Taqueria, told KOAT. “The menu’s not designed to insult people or hurt people, but it’s just meant to keep the conversation going as to what’s happening around us.”

Some locals have disagreed with Mohamed’s view on the menu.

“The way things are right now. It’s not good,” Juan Hernandez told KOAT. “We need to have respect for others and have limits.”

University of New Mexico professor Patricia Perea added: “It seems fun, it seems like you can make fun of this and maybe make it lighthearted, but you really can’t, you’re offending a whole community.

“It’s normalizing the terms and potentially turning them into funny or humorous terms, and the more that you do that, the more likely people are to repeat them and perhaps forget the contexts in which they were said.”

But there were many people who supported the menu choice as well.

Others disagreed and said the restaurant was just making a brave choice with their names. “To me it’s not offensive,” Christy Garcia told KOAT. “I just think it’s interesting that they decided to be so bold with the names.”

The restaurant and its menu has received positive reviews online. “Awesome menu names!!!! Love the creativity! Don’t cave to those so easily offended. They can simply choose not to eat there,” wrote Amber Atchley Cokins in a review on Facebook.

“Great food, and atmosphere. Customer service is good. Love the names of the dishes,” added Autumn Blake.

And as one Twitter user pointed out, maybe this was all just a successful marketing gimmick.

But we’ll be the first to point out that no business should ever use the trauma and hate experienced by a community as a marketing ploy. The words on this restaurant’s menu have been used to demean and attack minority communities, but especially Latinos.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

People Have Taken To The Streets Across The Country In Breonna Taylor Protests

Things That Matter

People Have Taken To The Streets Across The Country In Breonna Taylor Protests

@KRISTENCLARKEJD / TWITTER

Cities across the U.S. are seeing a new wave of unrest following the grand jury’s finding on the Breonna Taylor case. Emotions are high as people protest against the lack of charges against the officers who were involved in Taylor’s death.

Protesters are raising their voices after the decision not to charge all of the officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s death.

Breonna Taylor was shot and killed on March 13 when police raided her apartment. The 26-year-old ER technician was sleeping when the police executed a “no-knock” warrant. However, police had the wrong address and Taylor’s boyfriend, believe their lives were in danger, fired at the police. Taylor was shot and killed in her apartment that night.

Major cities across the country saw major demonstrations spurred by the anger against the justice system.

A grand jury found one officer responsible for wanton endangerment after firing his weapon into neighboring apartments. There were no charges tied directly to Taylor’s death. The lack of charges has angered activists and advocates who are seeking significant police reform to prevent tragedies like this from happening again.

People have become hyper-aware of the issue and are paying attention to the outcomes.

Protest signs in different crowds show that the American people are paying attention. The Black Lives Matter movement became the cause at the forefront of American mentality since George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. Floyd’s death sparked national outrage and renewed energy into fighting to stop the disproportionate violence Black men, women, and children face at the hands of police.

Some motorists have turned violent against the protesters.

Video captured in both Denver and Los Angeles show vehicles driving through crowds of protesters. In Denver, the driver claims to have acted in self-defense after protesters surrounded his car. The driver claims that he did not intend to hurt anyone but reacted when protesters shattered his windshield.

In Louisville, police arrested the only Black woman in the Kentucky state legislature for protesting.

State Rep. Attica Scott was arrested for first-degree rioting, which is a class-D felony. The Louisville Metropolitan Police Department arrested 24 people Thursday night while protesting the decision not to charge the officers. Rep. Scott was arrested with other and charged with first-degree rioting and two misdemeanors for unlawful assembly and failure to disperse.

“Our call to action is to continue to make sure that the city of Louisville understands that we will not go away, that we will continue to demand the defunding of police and the dismantling of this police department because it’s corrupt from the inside out, from the bottom to the top,” Scott told NPR before the grand jury decision. “And it cannot continue to function in the way that it does.”

Taylor’s death has mobilized the nation with celebrities and politicians calling for justice.

The fight for racial justice and a systemic change to our justice and policing systems is ongoing. The people are tired of being scared and are taking a stand with their protests.

If you are out there protesting, send us your videos and photos so we can see your activism in action!

READ: Oprah Winfrey Honors Breonna Taylor With Historic O Magazine Cover

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Culture

You Can Order A ‘Taco Vacuna’ And ‘La Cura’ At This Covid 19-Themed Taqueria

Tacovid: SaborViral / Facebook

Pandemia. Brote. Vacuna. La Peste. Although you may find these terms in a glossary about the Covid-19 outbreak, that’s not what these words actually refer to. Instead, they’re options on the menu at a Mexican taqueria called “Tacovid: Sabor Viral”, a perhaps surprisingly very successful Coronavirus-themed restaurant.

Although to many having a Covid-themed taqueria may seem morbid or disrespectful or perhaps gross – I mean who wants to order a plague taco? – the taqueria is making light of a very serious situation with humor. Something that several other businesses have done since the pandemic began.

”Tacovid: Sabor Viral” is the Mexican taqueria going viral – pun intended – for its Covid-themed menu.

Ok…virus-themed tacos don’t exactly sound appetizing. Especially, as we’re still in the midst of a very real pandemic. But one 23-year-old man in the Mexican city of León, who was forced to close down his dance studio because of Coronavirus, is counting on a Covid-themed restaurant – and so far he’s been surprised by its success.

Brandon Velázquez converted his dance academy into a taquería at the end of July, and given that Mexico and the rest of the world was – and is – in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic decided to call it Tacovid Sabor Viral.

“I had to close my dance academy during the pandemic [but] then an opportunity arose to return to the same place, however, people still did not go out for fear of getting infected.” he told the newspaper El Universal.

“I had always wanted to open a taqueria and, at the end of July, the opportunity to do so occurred. It was how I took advantage of the moment to create this business with a coronavirus theme,” he added.

Items on the menu are named after – you guessed it – the Coronavirus and don’t sound like anything you’d willfully choose to order.

The young entrepreneur detailed the name of each dish, taking full advantage of the Coronavirus theme.

“We have around 12 different dishes, among them are the ‘Tacovid’; we have ‘Forty’, ‘Quesanitizing’, ‘Pandemic’, ‘Outbreak’, and many others. The price varies depending on the dish you order,” he told El Universal.

In addition to themed dishes, the servers also fit the Coronavirus-theme.

When the pandemic hit Mexico, the government urged Mexicans to observe “su sana distancia” and the now common mascot – Susana Distancia – was born.

“In the restaurant, a waitress dressed as a nurse with the name of ‘Susana’ takes orders and works the tables, referring to the healthy distance campaign that was implemented as a precautionary measure,” he says.

To his surprise – and honestly mine as well – the taqueria has been very successful.

Brandon told El Universal that he’s been pleasantly surprised by the support he has received from customers. “I’m surprised because we have had really good sales, despite the circumstances, we have had a lot of support by the community and we’ve already expanded to have two locations.”

“Customers are funny about the theme we are using in the business, and they are delighted with the dishes we are offering. They enjoy it and have a good time,” added Brandon.

Things are looking so good for Brandon and his Covid-themed taqueria, that he’s looking to expand the food business and add new dishes to the menu. “There is always the idea of new names for other dishes that we want to include in the menu.”

Brandon also said that he’s looking to build out a business model so the restaurant could expand to other parts of the country as a franchise.

Apparently, people are really into Covid-themed foods, as this isn’t the first place that a shop as cashed in on the pandemic. Back in April, a panadería was selling out of Covid-themed baked goods so quickly, they couldn’t keep the shelves stocked.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com