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After Devastating Earthquake, Mexicans Are Showing Solidarity And Unity As Recovery Efforts Begin

Hector Vivas / Getty

After a magnitude 7.1 earthquake devastated central and parts of southern Mexico yesterday afternoon, the country is coming together to focus on rescue and recovery efforts, and to help those in need. The latest data reported has the death toll at more than 200 people. Deaths have been reported in Mexico City and other areas impacted by the earthquake, such as the states of Morelos, Puebla, Guerrero and Oaxaca.

 The death toll could rise as rescue workers continue to sift through the rubble of several collapsed buildings.

Luis Felipe Puente, the national coordinator for civil protection, tweeted an updated death toll from the earthquake with a breakdown of the areas where people died. According to Puente, Mexico City sustained the highest number of deaths at 86, with 12 other casualties reported in the State of Mexico. It’s also been confirmed that there have been 71 deaths in Morelos, 43 deaths in Puebla, four deaths in Guerrero and one death in Oaxaca.

Sobering footage of the devastating earthquake continues to make its way to social media.

The video above shows the city of Jojutla, Morelos, being shaken violently by the earthquake. Jojutla is located just 70 miles from the earthquake’s epicenter near the city of Puebla.

There is widespread infrastructure damage in the affected areas.

Bridges, metro lines and overpasses have been severely damaged by the quake.

One of the most heartbreaking stories from the catastrophic event is an elementary school in Mexico City that collapsed with children still inside.

Crews were working through the night to save the children still trapped under the rubble. According to The Los Angeles Times, at least 20 children and two adults died when a wing of the school collapsed. The latest report claims that there are still 30 children and eight adults missing from the school. Rescue workers lift their arms –  a sign they use to ask for silence –  to try and hear for voices beneath the rubble.

“Children are often the most vulnerable in emergencies such as this and we are particularly concerned because schools across the region were in session and filled with students,” Jorge Vidal, director of operations at Save the Children in Mexico, told ABC News.

There have been some moments of hope: Mexico City Mayor Miguel Ángel Mancera announced the rescue of 52 people.

The 52 people were saved from one building. As of now, there are reports that 38 buildings collapsed in the densely populated capital city.

In the wake of the earthquake, residents of Mexico City have banded together as they start the long road to recovery.

People have spent time digging through debris to save every person and pet they come across.

A group of teachers sang to keep children calm after the city was shaken.

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And volunteers have flooded every possible site to help remove debris and people from collapsed structures.

The recovery process has just begun in Mexico City but it appears that progress is already being made.

Mexico’s professional fútbol league, Liga MX, canceled all its matches this weekend so its stadiums could be used for relief efforts.

According to ESPN’s Tom Marshall, several stadiums throughout Mexico are being used as collection points for supplies and food that will be distributed to those affected by the earthquake.

If you are interested in helping those who have been affected by the earthquake, there are several ways to help. Here is a short list of organizations you can reach out to:

UNICEF Mexico: UNICEF has long been an organization that helps to protect and support children all over the world, especially in times of crisis and disaster.

Mexico Earthquake Relief Fund by GlobalGiving: GlobalGiving has helped raise more than $270 million since 2002 and vets all donation drives to ensure that they are legitimate and work for the cause they claim.

Red Cross Mexico: The Red Cross helps to provide supplies and shelter to those in need after a natural disaster.

Project Paz: Project Paz has a donation page set up where you can donate to help victims of either the Sept. 7 Oaxaca/Chiapas earthquake or the Sept. 19 Mexico City earthquake.

Los Topos: Los Topos is a rescue brigade that was formed after the 1985 Mexico City earthquake that devastated the city and are willing to step up again anytime a disaster hit’s Mexico’s capital. Donations are accepted via PayPal by sending to donativos@brigada-rescate-topos.org.


READ: Buildings Collapse And More Than 70 Dead After Mexico City Is Hit By Major Earthquake

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Here’s Your Reminder Of The Caesar Salad’s Mexican Roots

Culture

Here’s Your Reminder Of The Caesar Salad’s Mexican Roots

Taste.com

Those who don’t know any better give Mexican food a bad rap for being cheap and greasy. However, the Mexican culinary world expands far past Taco Bell and Taco Cabana. Authentic Mexican food is fresh, bold, delicious and versatile.

In fact, Mexico is responsible for one of the biggest fine dining staples there is.

Mexico is, in fact, the birthplace of the creamy and crisp Caesar salad.

Twitter / @oucrimsongirl

As the story goes, the Caesar salad was created in Tijuana, Mexico by an Italian restaurateur named Caesar Cardini. It was 1924 when Cardini established his restaurant in the tourist destination to cater to American guests escaping prohibition. While no one really knows the true story, most agree the salad was created over 4th of July holiday weekend.

Supposedly, the dish was completely improvised. Cardini is said to have thrown together several ingredients he had at his disposal and it created the fresh, delicious gourmet salad.

Twitter / @ladelandleaf

According to What’s Cooking America, the original recipe used a base of romain lettuce leafs. Additionally, garlic, parmesan cheese, croutons, boiled eggs, olive oil and Worcestershire sauce were added.

Rumor has it that it was Cardini’s brother, Alex, that added anchovies in 1926. He named his remix the “Aviator’s Salad.” Still, this anchovy-filled dish was so popular that it became known as the official Caesar salad.

Parts of this story is hard to prove, but it comes with a famous witness to offer some legitimacy to it.

Twitter / @keatonkildebell

The famous English chef, Julia Child, shared her first encounter with the iconic salad. In her book, “From Julia Child’s Kitchen,” the chef recounted her experience in a Tijuana restaurant. She wrote:

“My parents, of course, ordered the salad. Caesar himself rolled the big cart up to the table, tossed the romaine in a great wooden bowl, and I wish I could say I remembered his every move, but I don’t. They only thing I see again clearly is the eggs. I can see him break 2 eggs over that romaine and roll them in, the greens going all creamy as the eggs flowed over them. Two eggs in a salad? Two one-minute coddled eggs? And garlic-flavored croutons, and grated Parmesan cheese? It was a sensation of a salad from coast to coast, and there were even rumblings of its success in Europe.”

It’s popularity in Europe cause people to mistakenly think the Caesar salad is Italian.

Twitter / @Kylie_greenlee
Twitter / @2FlyT

However, the dish is 100% authentically Mexican cuisine. To recognize the delectable salad, in 1953, it was declared “the greatest recipe to originate from the Americas in 50 years” by the International Society of Epicure. We wouldn’t expect anything less from this Mexican classic.

WhatsApp Just Teamed Up With Walmart And It’s Going To Make Your Tías Love The App Even More

Things That Matter

WhatsApp Just Teamed Up With Walmart And It’s Going To Make Your Tías Love The App Even More

You may not give WhatsApp a second glance in the App Store, but in other countries, it’s the messaging app of choice.

It’s so big in Mexico, for instance, that Walmart Mexico is now accepting grocery delivery orders for its Superama supermarkets sent via the messaging app.

Walmart and WhatsApp team up to bring 24-hour home delivery to the masses.

Credit: @zyiteblog / Twitter

WhatsApp, the free text-messaging service owned by social media platform Facebook, is ubiquitous throughout Mexico. Superama shoppers can text an order to a WhatsApp number run by Walmart.

According to Walmart, customers can send their orders through WhatsApp to a number owned by Walmart – they don’t even have to type their list out. Many people have already tested the service and apparently, you can send the number a photo of a handwritten list and got a response from a representative immediately.

Yup, you can literally text the WhatsApp number a photo of your handwritten list.

Credit: @ChargedRetail / Twitter

Superama is charging about $2.55 for delivery within 90 minutes or $2 for orders with longer turnaround times. It also accepts payment in cash or card on delivery.

The Walmart-owned grocery chain, which makes up 92 of the retail giant’s 2,459 stores in Mexico, already takes orders through its website and app.

Clearly, though, it’s hoping that WhatsApp’s ubiquitous presence in the country will encourage more potential customers to give grocery delivery a shot.

And apparently, the representatives at the other end of that WhatsApp conversation are super helpful.

Credit: @dainabethcita / Twitter

Like who doesn’t want a response from Walmart full of emojis and helpful suggestions on buying the best of the best?! Everyone, that’s who!

Walmart already offers delivery through its own app, online, and via CornerShop.

Credit: @viajandoperdido / Twitter

But many are excited for the whole new market that this opens up and the novel use of an app that millions of people already use on a daily basis.

You could literally switch between a conversation with you tia about your novio and then chat with a representative at Walmart about which type of cereal you want delivered to your door.

Reactions across Twitter have been overwhelmingly positive.

Credit: @tridevgurung / Twitter

Many pointed out that people don’t have the smartphones required to run complicated apps – WhatsApp is a simple messaging service – meaning that mobile delivery service could be available to a wider audience.

READ: 20 Latino Brands That Are Clearly Superior To All Others

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