Things That Matter

If You Are A Dog Lover You’ll Love This List Of The 21 Rarest Breeds Ever

With 202 recognized dog breeds, it’s nearly impossible to know them all. We all know the most popular dog breeds like the German Shepherd or the Labrador Retriever, but the rare breeds go completely unnoticed by the general public. Luckily, there are dog enthusiasts like us, who love to share information about these gorgeous pups. We’ll go through 21 of the rarest breeds below!

 1. The English Foxhound

Credit: Instagram @AlberttheFoxhound

The English Foxhound was first recognized by the AKC in 1909.  Traditionally, the English Foxhound was used for hunting in large packs for fox. The English Foxhound is much stouter than her American counterpart, but is not known to be much heavier.

English Foxhounds are now gentle, loving, and loyal companions.

2.The Harrier

 Credit: Instagram @ gitane.piedsnus

The Harrier was recognized by the AKC way back in 1885. They’re known for their incredible hunting skills; often used for hunting rabbits and hares.

The Harrier is sturdy, strong, and well-balanced. They’re known to work well in essentially all terrain.

As a companion dog, they’re known to be friendly, outgoing, active, and relaxed.

Dog Breed 3: The Norwegian Lundehund

 Credit: Instagram @ muttcloth

The Norwegian Lundehund is a small Spitz breed who originated from Norway. In the past, they were bred to hunt puffins in extreme terrain. They have six toes on each foot and elongated rear foot pads which once allowed them to hunt on steep, vertical cliffs. Quite impressive!

If you’re searching for a companion rather than a working dog, this breed could still be for you. But, make sure you’re active. These dogs are alert, energetic, and love to go hiking with their pet parents.

Dog Breed 4: The American Foxhound

  Credit: Instagram @ milkbone_underwear

The American Foxhound is leaner than the English Foxhound, and was bred in the United States to hunt fox and other game.

They are scenting pack hounds. And, were traditionally bred to run effortlessly for many hours during their chase.

If you’re searching for a companion, the American Foxhound can be easy-going but be prepared to handle their stubborn streak. And, you should also be ready to provide her with a significant amount of exercise. She could be the perfect dog for an active runner.

5. The Otterhound

  Credit: Instagram @ AmericanKennelClub

The Otterhound is known for his friendly, cheerful personality. Traditionally, he was bred in England for hunting otters. The Otterhound is a bit different from other hound breeds, though. Because he needed to be ready to hunt on both land and in water, he sports a rough, double-coat and webbed feet. His body is strong and so is his mind; and, you should be prepared for a lot of questions from this curious canine.

6. The Cesky Terrier

Credit: Instagram @ AmericanKennelClub

The Cesky Terrier, like most terriers, is known for her determined and tenacious demeanor. She was originally bred to hunt in packs, but are known to be easier to train and more social than other terrier breeds.

If you’re searching for a companion, the Cesky Terrier is adventurous and loving. And, they’re not known to get into trouble as long as they are provided with a sufficient amount of physical and mental exercise.

7. The Finnish Spitz

 Credit: Instagram @ Bocopaspitz

The Finnish Spitz dog was originally bred for hunting small game and birds in Finland. Similar to other breeds in the ‘Spitz family,’ the Finnish Spitz is known for her excited, friendly, and courageous personality.

They’re a small dog. But, don’t let that fool you. They’re happy to go anywhere you want to go and are always ready for adventure.

8. The Chinook

 Credit: Instagram @ Dogsmakemehappystore

The Chinook was traditionally bred for drafting and sled dog racing. As such, they are known for their steady, athletic body, their willingness to please, and their intelligence.

The Chinook is also known to be an excellent family dog with a special love for children.

9. The Pyrenean Shepherd

Credit: Instagram @ Nikolinavrbat

The Pyrenean Shepherd is known for his superb athletic skills and his determination as a herding dog. The Pyrenean Shepherd is known to be mischievous with high energy.

The Pyrenean Shepherd makes an excellent family companion for an active home who enjoys a lot of playtime. Or, if you have a farm, you can help her run out some of her energy by allowing her to run free (once she’s properly trained of course).

10. The Skye Terrier

 Credit: Instagram @ AmericanKennelClub

The Skye Terrier originates from Scotland and were traditionally bred to hunt fox. Don’t let his size fool you, he’s known for his strength, courage, and well-tempered personality. He’s strong and agile, which makes him an excellent candidate for agility courses if that’s a quality you’re searching for.

She’s dedicated and loyal to her family, but she does have a stubborn streak. Agile and strong, this terrier is a breed with elegance and dignity. The breed is loyal and devoted to its family, although sometimes stubborn. Bred for hunting foxes along the Isle of Skye of Scotland, they are stronger than their size makes them appear.

11.The Bergamasco

Credit: Instagram @ Renzo.Romagnolo

Once you see the Bergamasco dog, their appearance will be hard to forget. As you can see, they’re easily recognized by the style of their coat. They have three types of fur which causes the coat to weave together giving her the look you see in the photograph above.

Traditionally, the Bergamasco was used as a sheepdog in the mountains of Persia. Now, she is known to be an intelligent family dog but be ready to deal with her stubborn attitude from time to time.

12. The Tibetan Mastiff

 Credit: Instagram @ Elite_k9k

The Tibetan Mastiff is known for his large size and kind expressions. He has an impressive, double-coat which causes him to look even bigger (not that he needs to look bigger).

As a family dog, he’s known to be a aloof, watchful, and independent. He’s difficult to train and not a good choice for beginning pet parents, but once he’s trained he is extremely loyal and will guard you with his life.

13. The Swedish Vallhund

 Credit: Instagram @ Vallhundenmorris

Swedish Vallhunds are known for their athletic abilities. Originally bred for herding, they often excel in obedience, agility, tracking, herding, and flyball. They’re small but fearless.

14. The Bedlington Terrier

 Credit: Instagram @ Mignon_Chorom

The Bedlington Terrier is known for her curly wool coat and could be mistaken for a lamb! She was traditionally used for racing and catching vermin due to her speed and endurance. She can make an excellent family companion with plenty of exercise.

15. The Catahoula Leopard Dog

Credit: Instagram @ Travelinoutcowdogs

The Catahoula Leopard Dog was the first dog breed in the United States and was once used to hunt wild boar. He’s often multi-colored and was named after the Catahoula Parish in Louisiana.

16. The Peruvian Inca Orchid

Credit: Instagram @ themuttleykrew

The Peruvian Inca Orchid has been around basically forever (since before AD 750). Today, she’s a rare but treasured companion. She’s known to be good at hunting and lure coursing, but her most notable quality is her lack of fur.

17. The Thai Ridgeback

Credit: Instagram @ Prestigepupz

The Thai Ridgeback is rarely heard of but gaining popularity. She’s known as the Thai Ridgeback due to a ridge of hair which grows in an opposite direction from the remainder of her coat.

18. The Azawakh

  Credit: Instagram @  bella_diara_andfriends

The Azawakh, a West African sighthound, is known to be a fierce protector of her family and a loving guardian. This breed has a short coat with all different colors and markings.

Dog Breed 19: The Lagotto Romagnolo

Credit: Instagram @ Lagotto_lovers

The Lagotto Romagnolo originates from Italy, and was traditionally used as a gun dog. These days, they have a different occupation, truffle hunting.

20. The Mudi

Credit: Instagram @ working_dogs_in_the_world

The Mudi is a Hungarian herding dog. In addition to herding, he’s a talented hunter, and skilled guardian. If you’re interested in the Mudi as a family companion, be sure to give him plenty of exercise.

21. The Pharoah Hound

 Credit: Instagram @ melissamstudio

The Pharaoh Hound, the national dog of Malta, is a Maltese breed of dog. In Maltese she’s known as Kelb tal-Fenek, which means “rabbit dog.” This correlates perfectly as she was originally bred to hunt rabbits.

Indigenous Communities In Mexico Are Giving Traditional Clothes To Dogs To Help Them Stay Warm This Winter

Culture

Indigenous Communities In Mexico Are Giving Traditional Clothes To Dogs To Help Them Stay Warm This Winter

El Pueblito

Covering Mexican news in the past few years has become a difficult job, particularly if you love this amazing country but are also aware of the many socioeconomic problems, crime and overall struggle that the United States’ southern neighbour has faced in recent decades due to drug cartels, corrupt governments and pressure from global markets. So every once in a while our hearts receive an apapacho with stories that reveal how solidarity and plain old human awesomeness are also part of the Mexican psyche. And of course a touch of creativity also leads to memorable moments in which kindness, often among the most vulnerable sections of the population, shines even more. 

Look at this doggie, all warm in this traditional dress from Yucatan. But the story behind the cute photo will get you thinking.

Credit: Mexico News Daily

So the story goes like this: a street dog in the southern state of Yucatan was suffering from the dropping temperatures, shaking as its bones were visible in her super thin fur coat. The dog’s name is Polita and she was given a traditional dress called huipil by the artisans of the town of Ticul.

As reported by Mexico News Daily, a local resident posted a photo on Facebook and since then the image has gone viral. “So that she doesn’t suffer from the cold, the little dog with her huipil. It’s worth sharing and making her go viral”, read the caption in the now famous photo. Ticul is located around 100 km south of the state capital city of Mérida. The majority of the population is of Maya heritage. It is such a heartwarming photo, even more so if we consider how vulnerable indigenous Mexicans, such as the huipil-making saints, still are in contemporary Mexico. 

But you might now that there is actually a day in which some Catholic Mexicans get their pets dressed in all sorts of amazing traditional costumes.

Every January 17 Mexican Catholics celebrate San Antonio Abad, the patron saint of animals. And every year large numbers of the faithful take their pets to church to get a blessing from the local padrecito. But of course the occasion needs to be solemn, so owners get their pets dressed in what passes as haute couture, all for the sake of cuteness…. and faith. 

Some costumes are more traditional than others, but they are all dolled up!

We wonder that is going through their canine minds while being showered in holy water… 

And just look at those chicken dresses in the town of Taxco.

We love the Zoolander duck face on this chicken. It knows it got swag and it flaunts it! 

And for some there is never a lost opportunity to show their devotion for a soccer team.

We can just imagine this dude watching soccer on a Sunday afternoon and cheleando with his two chihuahuas on his lap, wearing those cute tiny jerseys. Ternuritas. 

Is that a rastafari dog in Guerrero?

This is actually like an animal cosplay contest celebrated on San Antonio Abad day in Guerrero, Mexico. We don’t know if a Jamaican rastafari costume qualifies as traditional in Mexico, but the little fur ball sure looks cute, right? And look at the elegant little black dog to the right, with his royal attire, all ready to rule the world. 

A little Mexican kitsch nunca viene de sobra

We love the sarape and the hat on this tiny fella. And that hat must sure cover him from the scalding Guerrero sun. 

Is this princesa peluda about to celebrate her XV?

OMG, just look at her, al regal and ready to dance a smooth waltz. And look, she has got a chambelan and everything. And look at the surprise in the faces of those passersby. 

Si Adelita se fuera con otro… 

We love this little model in the style of the Mexican Revolution and its legendary female fighters, called Adelitas or soldaderas. Fierceness and cuteness in a cute little package. This photo is also from one of the contests organized in the town of Taxco (by the way, this town is a must for anyone visiting the country). 

How on Earth did they get those tiny chicks in those dresses?

We just hope that the little ones are OK. The craft needed for that tiny church is just admirable. Wow.

The US Congress Has Passed A New Law That Will Finally Put An End To Cockfighting In Puerto Rico

Culture

The US Congress Has Passed A New Law That Will Finally Put An End To Cockfighting In Puerto Rico

lu_jcs / Instagram

Before Spain colonized what we now call Puerto Rico, cockfighting was virtually nonexistent on the island. Spanish culture has long celebrated the entertainment value of watching animals fight to their death, from animals as small as chickens to as large as bulls. When Spain colonized Puerto Rico in the 17th century, imperialists brought their love of cockfighting to the island. Whatever your opinions on cockfighting, today, it’s become part of Puerto Rican culture. In fact, Puerto Ricans refused to take orders from their subsequent ruler, the United States, during a 34-year prohibition of cockfighting. 

Still, Congress is once again flexing its arm to eradicate the blood sport on the island. Animal activists had lobbied to enact a complete ban, including the last remaining U.S. territories, which includes Puerto Rico. 

Puerto Ricans are calling the ban on cockfighting an attack on their culture.

Credit: @duckm4st3r / Twitter

Vice called cockfighting “Puerto Rico’s most resilient industry” in 2016, but the $100 million industry has been in decline. Since 1985, the number of licensed arenas has nearly halved from 132 arenas to just 64 regulated arenas remaining. Still, around one million Puerto Ricans attend fights every year, which contributes to the livelihood of the veterinarians and cockfighters who profit off the blood sport.

Then governor Ricardo Rosselló didn’t travel to Washington in time to fight the bill.

Credit: hernansphotos / Instagram

Many Puerto Ricans feel like their status as a “U.S. territory” remains a euphemism for the reality: that Puerto Rico remains the world’s oldest colony. While a U.S. territory, Puerto Rico has no voice in Congress, the legislative body that passed the bill into effect, as part of a sweeping measure to limit animal cruelty across the United States. 

Even Puerto Ricans who reject the sport as a celebration of animal cruelty, still find it paternalistic for culture to be policed. It could have been a celebration of decolonizing the island from Spain’s rule, but Puerto Rican’s voices were silenced in the decision-making process. That said, a Humane Society poll of 1,000 registered Puerto Rican voters found that the majority of respondents supported the ban.

In a natural environment, roosters only fight when forced.

Credit: @BLaw / Twitter

According to Paul Siegel, a fowl genetics expert, cockfights are a rarity in the natural world because the weaker bird usually flees. “If there’s a way to escape, they’ll just get the heck out,” Siegel told PETA. Cockfighters deliberately create an arena that they cannot escape from. 

Animal activists think profit is no excuse for the cruelty inflicted on the birds.

Credit: @MagnoliaNews / Twitter

Then, they hot glue razor spurs to the roosters’ sensitive feet, and allow the roosters to fight to the death. Often, cockfighters will amputate the bony spurs roosters are born with, in order to glue the more fatal weapons on. Before entering the ring, cockfighters will pluck the feathers off their thighs so that they won’t be weakened by the pain of it happening in the ring. Before those crucial moments, they spend the majority of their lives socially isolated behind chicken wire.

“It’s like taking care of a baby,” cockfighter Wilfredo Burgo told Vice. “You take care of it from the egg. But you get used to it when they die.”

While cockfighters are feeling attacked by the U.S. government, they plan to fight back.

Credit: @Newarkguy1973 / Twitter

In the weeks after Congress passed the cockfighting ban, cockfighters were admittedly depressed, and stayed home from the fights. Six weeks later, two thousand cockfighters rallied outside the capitol building, thrusting their prized roosters into the air. San Juan’s mayor, Carmen Yulín Cruz, vowed that her city police forces will enforce the law, and that, “if federal agents want to, they’ll have to do it alone!”

“I’m a sixth-generation cockfighter,” José Torres, a trainer of fighting roosters, told NPR. “This is how I support my family. But I also inherited this. I was going to pass this onto my children.” Torres already informed his family that if the police show up at his door to confiscate the 250 roosters living in cages in his backyard, they will have to kill him first. He claims that there are thousands of cockfighters who plan for bloodshed the moment the ban is enforced.

Many are predicting that cockfighting will become an underground sport once again.

Credit: @j_lion_the_best / Twitter

Cockfighters are estimating that there are probably around 1 million roosters raised to fight on the island. Federal agents will likely euthanize the majority of the birds, sparing them an otherwise violent death.

READ: Puerto Rico Was Purposefully Denied Disaster Relief They Were Guaranteed By The Federal Government