Things That Matter

Latino Man’s Tesla Sentry Mode Alerted The Owner When A Disgruntled Fan Kicked His Car In The Parking Lot

Tesla’s Sentry Mode alerted its owner, Jay Rosas, to vandalism during last week’s San Francisco 49ers game against the Seattle Seahawks at Santa Clara’s Levi’s Stadium, and, now, the public has been alerted to help identify the vandal captured by Tesla’s nine cameras. For Tesla owners, gone are the days of returning to your car only to find it’s been devastated by a hit and run, or keyed by frustrated or angry vandals. In fact, for Jay Rosas, he didn’t even have to wait to watch his team, the San Francisco 49ers, lose to the Seattle Seahawks before returning to his car to see the destruction. Before the first half was even over, his car alerted him to a break-in, and he immediately went to investigate and involve the police. 

In a moment of anger, a fellow 49ers fan kicked in the trunk of his Tesla Model X, causing $4,700 in damage. Thanks to Tesla’s Sentry Mode, it’s all been caught on tape, and the vandal’s face is being blasted on the Internet to help Rosas find the less-than-exemplary citizen, who could now face felony charges.

Meet Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal:

CREDIT: @LIKETESLAKIM / TWITTER

“I ended up missing most of the game because I was outside dealing with the security people, the CHP, the police report, and we ended up losing the game, so it really kind of sucked,” Rosas told a local outlet. “To see another fan do that to our vehicle was really saddening and unfortunate.”

While the night might have been a bust for both the San Francisco 49ers, for Rosas and his trunk, the suspect could face jail time for his burst of anger. Even more, folks can’t seem to figure out why this guy was walking around the parking lot in so much anger. The 49ers were winning at the time.

The video shows Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal aggressively kicking in the car’s trunk and continuing to walk away.

CREDIT: @DANAVILCEA / TWITTER

Rosas has released the car’s footage to the Santa Clara Police Department to help identify the suspect, and lean on public support for any information regarding the identity of our Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal. While Rosas could see the suspect vandalizing his car from several different angles, it wasn’t until he left the stands and made it to his car that he could see the damage. A single kick caused more than $4,700 in damage. While the rest of us have certainly returned to our cars and had to pay for someone’s uncontrolled anger out of pocket, Tesla’s Sentry Mode and the public’s help may aid in identifying the vandal and making him pay for his crimes.

Under California law, if convicted, the vandal would face a minimum of one year in jail but could be sentenced to three years in jail. He would also have to pay a fine of up to $10,000.

Rosas is offering a $1,000 or two 49ers tickets for any information that would lead to an arrest.

CREDIT: @ACCESS_LIBERTY / TWITTER

It’s simply not okay to destroy someone else’s property no matter how angry you are. “It is not typical for there to be intentional damage on vehicles like the one I’ve seen in this case. It’s actually quite rare,” Santa Clara Police Capt. Wahid Kazem, Santa Clara Police Dept, told ABC. “Nonetheless, it is a crime, given the magnitude of damage on this car, and the approximate cost of repair.” Much of Tesla’s body is made up of expensive aluminum, which is lightweight, but far less durable than steel and more expensive to repair.

Tesla’s Sentry Mode was rolled out earlier this year to help guard against break-ins and theft.

CREDIT: @BOOBYRETARD / TWITTER

Tesla’s Sentry Mode is will alert its owners if someone is even leaning on their car. When the cameras detect a more severe threat, Sentry Mode sends an “Alarm” signal to the owner, activates the car alarm, increases the brightness of the center display and plays music at maximum volume to scare the vandal or thief. If the Santa Clara Police Department’s Facebook page is any indicator of what the department wants to alert its residents to, vehicle theft is top priority. Of the nine Facebook posts made in the last week, five were about car theft or car vandalism. When a concerned citizen asked why Santa Clara residents even have to worry about it, the page responded, “Thefts from vehicles are something individuals should be concerned about throughout California, not just in Santa Clara.”

If you recognize Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal, please contact the Santa Clara Police Department.

READ: Elon Musk Still Wants To Release His Teslaquila But He Doesn’t Seem To Be Making It Happen

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A Jealous Cheerleading Mom Created A ‘Deep Fake’ Video To Get Her Daughter’s Rival Kicked Off Of The Team

Things That Matter

A Jealous Cheerleading Mom Created A ‘Deep Fake’ Video To Get Her Daughter’s Rival Kicked Off Of The Team

If you thought “Mean Girls” was as rough as it gets, you haven’t heard the one about a cheerleader who ended up with a mom’s target on her back. Madi Hime, a Pennsylvania high school cheerleader has become the victim of the modern age… and a mom with vengeance on the mind.

Raffaela Spone is being accused of targeting Hime with a fake video of her smoking.

According to reports, the Pennsylvania mother doctored the image of the high school cheerleader. The mom allegedly conspired to have her daughter’s rivals kicked off the school’s cheerleading squad by creating “deep fake” videos of them in compromising positions.

Madi Hime, just 17, recently told Good Morning America in a recent interview that she broke down in tears when her coach confronted her with a fake video of her vaping. The doctored video implied that not only was she smoking, but she was in violation of the team’s code of conduct.

“I went in the car and started crying and was like, ‘That’s not me in the video,’” Hines told Good Morning America on Monday. “I thought if I said it, no one would believe me because obviously, there’s proof, there’s a video – but obviously that video was manipulated.”

In addition to being confronted with the video by her coach, Hime said she was also sent photos of herself via text from a person who claimed to be a concerned parent. Shocked, Hime shared the pictures with her mother who went to the police.

“It had actually been going on for quite a while, I just didn’t know about it,” Hime’s mother told GMA. “I told her ‘I will call the police,’ because I wanted her to know that’s how much I believed her.”

Eventually, police looking into the images were able to trace the messages to Raffaela Spone, the mother of another student also accused of sending altered images to two other teammates.

Spone, 50, is now charged with cyber harassment of a child by creating images called “deep fakes.”

Robert Birch, her attorney, said his client denies the claims that she was attempting to take down her daughter’s cheerleading rivals.

“She has absolutely denied what they’re charging her with and because of the fact that this has hit the press, she has received death threats,” Birch explained. “She has had to go to the police herself, they have a report. Her life has been turned upside down.”

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All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Entertainment

All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Netflix continues to churn out powerful films in countries around the world and their latest venture, a look into the life of Brazilian footballer Pelé is another hit. Sure, Pelé may be considered the world’s best soccer player ever but his place in Brazilian history is less clear – at least according to the new doc.

Filmmakers David Tryhorn and Ben Nicholas spent hours in Pelé’s company interviewing him on everything from a childhood spent in poverty to his numerous affairs and his controversial relationship with the authoritarian regime that ruled Brazil during his playing career. Here are some of the key takeaways from this must watch documentary.

Pelé was criticized for not taking a political stance during Brazil’s authoritarian regime.

In 1964, the Brazilian military staged a coup, which led to a dictatorship being established in the country that lasted until 1985. The military government relied on torture and repression to maintain power.

In the film, Pelé is asked whether he knew about these practices at the time.

“If I were to say now that I had never been aware of it, that would be a lie,” he says. “There was a lot we never got to find out, but there were many stories too.”

However, the film paints him as taking a neutral stance throughout, never criticising the regime. Former team-mate Paulo Cezar Lima – aka Caju – doesn’t forgive him.

“I love Pele but that won’t stop me criticizing him. I thought his behavior was that of a black man who says ‘yes sir’,” said Caju. “A submissive black man. It’s a criticism I hold against him until this day, because just one statement from Pelé would have gone a long way.”

The government may have interfered with the Brazilian team.

A dejected Pele leaves the field at Goodison Park after being beaten 3-1 by Portugal, 1966.

The film paints a picture of how national team’s exploits were used to launder the reputation of the military regime during the 1960s. Before the 1970 World Cup, a journalist and friend of Pelé’s describes how it became very important for the regime’s international image that Brazil win the World Cup again. And that meant Pele had to play.

“Winning the World Cup became a governmental matter,” Kfouri says. “The team staff were almost entirely made up of military personnel.”

Manager Joao Saldanha appears to have been fired in the lead-up to the 1970 World Cup for criticizing the Brazilian president, telling a reporter: “I don’t pick his ministers and he doesn’t pick my team. That way we understand each other well.”

Pelé wanted to quit after the 1966 World Cup.

Credit: Pelé / Netflix

In the 1966 World Cup, Brazil was considered a favorite to win, having won the competition four years earlier in Chile. However, there was a massive shock when they were knocked out in the group stages.

“Getting knocked out of the World Cup in England was the saddest moment of my life,” Pelé says. In the film, he tells a reporter: “I don’t intend to play in any more World Cups, because I’m not lucky in them. This is the second World Cup where I have been injured after only two games.”

He played one more World Cup – the 1970 tournament in Mexico, which Brazil won. He’s still the only player to have won three World Cup trophies.

And he admits it was hard for him to stay faithful.

Stores of Pelé’s alleged infidelities and wild romances were common in the tabloids. By 1958, he was a global icon and football’s first millionaire while still only a teenager. And his fans followed him everywhere so it’s hardly a secret that Pelé did not show the same faithfulness to everyone in his life as he did to his club Santos.

At one point in the film, a journalist asks Pelé whether he found it difficult to remain faithful with the amount of women flirting with him.

“In all honesty, it was,” he says, “I’ve had a few affairs, some of which resulted in children, but I only learned about them later. My first wife knew all about it, I never lied to anyone.”

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