Things That Matter

Latino Man’s Tesla Sentry Mode Alerted The Owner When A Disgruntled Fan Kicked His Car In The Parking Lot

Tesla’s Sentry Mode alerted its owner, Jay Rosas, to vandalism during last week’s San Francisco 49ers game against the Seattle Seahawks at Santa Clara’s Levi’s Stadium, and, now, the public has been alerted to help identify the vandal captured by Tesla’s nine cameras. For Tesla owners, gone are the days of returning to your car only to find it’s been devastated by a hit and run, or keyed by frustrated or angry vandals. In fact, for Jay Rosas, he didn’t even have to wait to watch his team, the San Francisco 49ers, lose to the Seattle Seahawks before returning to his car to see the destruction. Before the first half was even over, his car alerted him to a break-in, and he immediately went to investigate and involve the police. 

In a moment of anger, a fellow 49ers fan kicked in the trunk of his Tesla Model X, causing $4,700 in damage. Thanks to Tesla’s Sentry Mode, it’s all been caught on tape, and the vandal’s face is being blasted on the Internet to help Rosas find the less-than-exemplary citizen, who could now face felony charges.

Meet Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal:

CREDIT: @LIKETESLAKIM / TWITTER

“I ended up missing most of the game because I was outside dealing with the security people, the CHP, the police report, and we ended up losing the game, so it really kind of sucked,” Rosas told a local outlet. “To see another fan do that to our vehicle was really saddening and unfortunate.”

While the night might have been a bust for both the San Francisco 49ers, for Rosas and his trunk, the suspect could face jail time for his burst of anger. Even more, folks can’t seem to figure out why this guy was walking around the parking lot in so much anger. The 49ers were winning at the time.

The video shows Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal aggressively kicking in the car’s trunk and continuing to walk away.

CREDIT: @DANAVILCEA / TWITTER

Rosas has released the car’s footage to the Santa Clara Police Department to help identify the suspect, and lean on public support for any information regarding the identity of our Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal. While Rosas could see the suspect vandalizing his car from several different angles, it wasn’t until he left the stands and made it to his car that he could see the damage. A single kick caused more than $4,700 in damage. While the rest of us have certainly returned to our cars and had to pay for someone’s uncontrolled anger out of pocket, Tesla’s Sentry Mode and the public’s help may aid in identifying the vandal and making him pay for his crimes.

Under California law, if convicted, the vandal would face a minimum of one year in jail but could be sentenced to three years in jail. He would also have to pay a fine of up to $10,000.

Rosas is offering a $1,000 or two 49ers tickets for any information that would lead to an arrest.

CREDIT: @ACCESS_LIBERTY / TWITTER

It’s simply not okay to destroy someone else’s property no matter how angry you are. “It is not typical for there to be intentional damage on vehicles like the one I’ve seen in this case. It’s actually quite rare,” Santa Clara Police Capt. Wahid Kazem, Santa Clara Police Dept, told ABC. “Nonetheless, it is a crime, given the magnitude of damage on this car, and the approximate cost of repair.” Much of Tesla’s body is made up of expensive aluminum, which is lightweight, but far less durable than steel and more expensive to repair.

Tesla’s Sentry Mode was rolled out earlier this year to help guard against break-ins and theft.

CREDIT: @BOOBYRETARD / TWITTER

Tesla’s Sentry Mode is will alert its owners if someone is even leaning on their car. When the cameras detect a more severe threat, Sentry Mode sends an “Alarm” signal to the owner, activates the car alarm, increases the brightness of the center display and plays music at maximum volume to scare the vandal or thief. If the Santa Clara Police Department’s Facebook page is any indicator of what the department wants to alert its residents to, vehicle theft is top priority. Of the nine Facebook posts made in the last week, five were about car theft or car vandalism. When a concerned citizen asked why Santa Clara residents even have to worry about it, the page responded, “Thefts from vehicles are something individuals should be concerned about throughout California, not just in Santa Clara.”

If you recognize Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal, please contact the Santa Clara Police Department.

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Tech Companies Like Apple And Facebook Are Putting Billions Of Dollars Toward Affordable Housing, A Crisis They Created

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Tech Companies Like Apple And Facebook Are Putting Billions Of Dollars Toward Affordable Housing, A Crisis They Created

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It’s no hidden secret that affordable housing has become a growing crisis on the West Coast. Cities like San Jose, San Francisco, and Seattle have all seen tech giants come into communities and play a big role when it comes to the huge spike in the cost of living. While Apple, Facebook, Google, and Amazon have contributed to economic success in these areas, there is a large portion of middle and lower-class residents, mostly Latino and Blacks, who aren’t seeing any of that growth. With an increasing number of tech workers coming into these cities, rising home and rent costs have followed. That in return has created a housing crisis for many.

 In recent months, these tech companies have finally spoken up about the problem by pledging to spend money on building affordable housing in their respective communities. Back in June, Google announced $1 billion while Facebook pledged another $1 billion in October. Apple, earlier this month, said it would devote $2.5 billion. Yet there is increased skepticism and concerns that throwing money at this issue won’t solve anything. 

Tech companies like Google and Amazon have brought in billions of dollars in local tax revenue in cities like San Jose and Seattle. But that success has also created a housing issue for many that can’t afford to live there anymore. 

The rise of these giant tech companies has also meant a rise in the cost of living in the nearby cities that they’re located in. That is evident when looking at the economics of the housing markets and the number of people moving into these communities. Over the last decade, there was an 8.4 percent increase in the total population of the Bay Area, which includes San Francisco and San Jose, but during that same period, the number of housing units grew by less than 5 percent. 

Even as new homes are being built, the prices have become more of a reflection of the new demographic coming in. According to NBC, “Software engineers earn a starting salary of about $160,000 at Apple, Google, and Facebook, 40 percent more than the national average for the same job.”

Many middle-class Latinos and Black families have struggled to find affordable housing in these tech cities and as a result, many are now homeless.  

 Credit: Unsplash

The sight of homelessness and giant RV’s parked on city streets has become an image too familiar in San Jose as many have turned to living out of their cars. In the Bay Area, the issue of homelessness has only been expedited by the rise in home and rent prices which can be attributed to the tech industry in the area. As of now, the Bay Area has the third-largest population of people experiencing homelessness. Ahead of it is New York and Los Angeles, with Seattle just behind. 

What has become evident is that one specific population of people is benefitting from these economic and social gains while others has been somewhat been forgotten. Tamara Mitchell, a volunteer at the Coalition on Homelessness in San Francisco, is one of those that feels like the city has turned it’s back on people like her. 

“It kind of feels like they’re pushing you out of your home,” Mitchell told CNBC. “We’ve been homeless, we’ve been staying in hotels, we’ve been staying with family members – it’s been a lot.”

Making matters worse is the lack of opportunity for some when it comes to those trying to gain from the economic benefits in the area. When it comes to hiring, the most common demographic tech companies hired in 2018 were white and Asian male-identified individuals. Last year, Google employed 95 percent white or Asian individuals and 74 percent of those hired were male. The same trend followed at Apple as the same figures came in at 84 percent and 77 percent, respectively. In return, this has left most of the remaining jobs as lower-wage positions with limited opportunities with the majority of these roles being taken by Latinos and Blacks.  

“We’re being ignored,” Liz González, a contributor at Silicon Valley De-Bug, told CNBC about rising concerns of Google in the Bay Area. “We’re being displaced, and folks who have no long term interests in this community get to decide what it looks like and who gets to live here.”

As these tech companies have made a commitment to try and address the affordable housing crisis in their communities, many wonder if it’s enough or too late altogether. 

Credit: Unsplash

As the more than $4.5 billion in corporate contributions towards affordable housing has been announced, money still may not be enough to fix the problem. Experts say addressing issues like rewriting zoning and permit regulations from local governments, building various housing options besides single-family homes and public transportation alternatives. 

What these tech companies have also realized is that retaining and attracting new employees will become an increasingly prominent issue as housing and rent prices continue to soar. While there is skepticism that affordable housing in the Bay Area and Seattle can be fixed in the near future, some are relieved to finally seeing tech companies acknowledge that there is a problem.

“I don’t think any tech company that has made these new announcements are really thinking their single contribution is solving the housing crisis,” said Kevin Zwick, CEO of Housing Trust Silicon Valley, told CBS. “It doesn’t solve the entire problem, but the fact that they’re joining is a big, important, positive step to getting us to solve the crisis.”

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Activists Interrupt Harvard-Yale Football Game To Protest Climate Change And Cancel Puerto Rico Debt Holdings

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Activists Interrupt Harvard-Yale Football Game To Protest Climate Change And Cancel Puerto Rico Debt Holdings

extinctionrebellion / Instagram

The Harvard-Yale football game was delayed during halftime on Saturday after more than 150 students and alumni took to the field to protest against the schools’ endowments from fossil fuel companies and Puerto Rican debt. The scene was captured across social media as videos were shared of students unfurling banners that read “Nobody wins. Yale & Harvard are complicit in climate injustice,” among others signs.

The annual football game between both Ivy League schools was delayed for almost an hour as police demanded over speakers that protesters leave the field. In videos, you can hear protesters chanting “disclose, divest and reinvest,” as more fans from the stands joined protesters on the field. The end result was 42 people being charged with disorderly conduct, protest organizers had initially said that 20 to 30 protesters were arrested.

“Students are tired of Harvard and Yale profiting off of climate destruction and neocolonial investments in Puerto Rico’s debt,” a statement by student group Divest Harvard read. “It’s time for more than lip service and greenwashing from academic leaders. Harvard and Yale must address the climate emergency at the scale and with the urgency it demands. This action is only the beginning.”

The reason behind the protest was to speak up against the schools to divest from fossil fuels and cancel their Puerto Rico debt holdings, among other issues. 

While there was some initial confusion behind the reasoning of students taking the field, the message was clear that there was anger at both Yale and Harvard financial dealings. According to Vox, both of the schools “rely on funds, bonds, and assorted financial instruments to keep their endowments strong”. Many students and alumni are looking at the schools profiting from the ongoing climate crisis and want them to divest their endowments from fossil fuel holdings and to cancel any debt from Puerto Rico.

“Harvard and Yale claim their goal is to create student leaders who can strive toward a more ‘just, fair, and promising world’ by ‘improving the world today and for future generations.’ Yet by continuing to invest in industries that mislead the public, smear academics, and deny reality, Harvard and Yale are complicit in tearing down that future,” the student groups, Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard, Fossil Free Yale and Yale Endowment Justice Coalition, said in a statement following Saturday’s protest.

This has been a growing movement on college campuses across the country that has peaked as environmental issues have come to the forefront of various institutions. Back in September, activists celebrated a victory at the University of California system said that it would move away from investing from fossil fuels.

For Harvard senior Caleb Schwartz, who was one of the various protest organizers that were arrested on Saturday, told NPR about the events that unfolded on the field. “That moment, when we saw people running onto the field was just really incredible,” Schwartz said. “I saw organizers around me crying because it was such a beautiful moment.

Yale responded to Saturday’s protest saying that while the school supports freedom of expression, it shouldn’t come at the cost of delaying a sporting event.

Yale released a statement shortly after the game that the school “stands firmly for the right to free expression” but just not as the cost of this football game.

“It is regrettable,” a statement released by Yale read, “that the orchestrated protest came during a time when fellow students were participating in a collegiate career-defining contest and an annual tradition when thousands gather from around the world to enjoy and celebrate the storied traditions of both football programs and universities.”

The protest received support from various politicians who supported the activists’ cause and freedom and expression.

One of those who supported Saturday’s protest was Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., who tweeted “Activism disrupts the present to change the future.

Former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro also took to Twitter to shoutout the activists and said that he was impressed by the students’ efforts. “From the March for Our Lives, to worldwide Climate Strikes, students and young people are leading the charge to protect their futures,” Castro wrote. “I’m inspired by their efforts to hold their universities to a higher standard.”

There is no doubt that this protest has put these issues at the forefront of many people’s minds, especially at other fellow colleges. Don’t be surprised if this isn’t the last sporting event that gets disrupted to send the powerful message of climate change. 

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