Things That Matter

Latino Man’s Tesla Sentry Mode Alerted The Owner When A Disgruntled Fan Kicked His Car In The Parking Lot

Tesla’s Sentry Mode alerted its owner, Jay Rosas, to vandalism during last week’s San Francisco 49ers game against the Seattle Seahawks at Santa Clara’s Levi’s Stadium, and, now, the public has been alerted to help identify the vandal captured by Tesla’s nine cameras. For Tesla owners, gone are the days of returning to your car only to find it’s been devastated by a hit and run, or keyed by frustrated or angry vandals. In fact, for Jay Rosas, he didn’t even have to wait to watch his team, the San Francisco 49ers, lose to the Seattle Seahawks before returning to his car to see the destruction. Before the first half was even over, his car alerted him to a break-in, and he immediately went to investigate and involve the police. 

In a moment of anger, a fellow 49ers fan kicked in the trunk of his Tesla Model X, causing $4,700 in damage. Thanks to Tesla’s Sentry Mode, it’s all been caught on tape, and the vandal’s face is being blasted on the Internet to help Rosas find the less-than-exemplary citizen, who could now face felony charges.

Meet Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal:

CREDIT: @LIKETESLAKIM / TWITTER

“I ended up missing most of the game because I was outside dealing with the security people, the CHP, the police report, and we ended up losing the game, so it really kind of sucked,” Rosas told a local outlet. “To see another fan do that to our vehicle was really saddening and unfortunate.”

While the night might have been a bust for both the San Francisco 49ers, for Rosas and his trunk, the suspect could face jail time for his burst of anger. Even more, folks can’t seem to figure out why this guy was walking around the parking lot in so much anger. The 49ers were winning at the time.

The video shows Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal aggressively kicking in the car’s trunk and continuing to walk away.

CREDIT: @DANAVILCEA / TWITTER

Rosas has released the car’s footage to the Santa Clara Police Department to help identify the suspect, and lean on public support for any information regarding the identity of our Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal. While Rosas could see the suspect vandalizing his car from several different angles, it wasn’t until he left the stands and made it to his car that he could see the damage. A single kick caused more than $4,700 in damage. While the rest of us have certainly returned to our cars and had to pay for someone’s uncontrolled anger out of pocket, Tesla’s Sentry Mode and the public’s help may aid in identifying the vandal and making him pay for his crimes.

Under California law, if convicted, the vandal would face a minimum of one year in jail but could be sentenced to three years in jail. He would also have to pay a fine of up to $10,000.

Rosas is offering a $1,000 or two 49ers tickets for any information that would lead to an arrest.

CREDIT: @ACCESS_LIBERTY / TWITTER

It’s simply not okay to destroy someone else’s property no matter how angry you are. “It is not typical for there to be intentional damage on vehicles like the one I’ve seen in this case. It’s actually quite rare,” Santa Clara Police Capt. Wahid Kazem, Santa Clara Police Dept, told ABC. “Nonetheless, it is a crime, given the magnitude of damage on this car, and the approximate cost of repair.” Much of Tesla’s body is made up of expensive aluminum, which is lightweight, but far less durable than steel and more expensive to repair.

Tesla’s Sentry Mode was rolled out earlier this year to help guard against break-ins and theft.

CREDIT: @BOOBYRETARD / TWITTER

Tesla’s Sentry Mode is will alert its owners if someone is even leaning on their car. When the cameras detect a more severe threat, Sentry Mode sends an “Alarm” signal to the owner, activates the car alarm, increases the brightness of the center display and plays music at maximum volume to scare the vandal or thief. If the Santa Clara Police Department’s Facebook page is any indicator of what the department wants to alert its residents to, vehicle theft is top priority. Of the nine Facebook posts made in the last week, five were about car theft or car vandalism. When a concerned citizen asked why Santa Clara residents even have to worry about it, the page responded, “Thefts from vehicles are something individuals should be concerned about throughout California, not just in Santa Clara.”

If you recognize Suspect Angry 49ers Vandal, please contact the Santa Clara Police Department.

READ: Elon Musk Still Wants To Release His Teslaquila But He Doesn’t Seem To Be Making It Happen

These Latinas Are Changing The World With Their Groundbreaking Inventions In Science, Technology, And Engineering

Things That Matter

These Latinas Are Changing The World With Their Groundbreaking Inventions In Science, Technology, And Engineering

@techreview_es / Twitter

Women are under-represented in the tech sector. Not only that, but they’re underpaid, often passed for promotions and faced with everyday sexism. It’s no wonder women are more likely to leave the industry within a year compared to their male counterparts. But there’s hope. Last week, the MIT Technology Review published a list of the leading Latin American innovators of 2019, and we wanted to highlight the women, who have pushed through in a male-dominated industry and are creating solutions for issues like climate change, terminal illnesses, and other threats. 

In a field that requires women to work alongside men who don’t believe women have the intelligence and inclination to work in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math), these Latina innovators are proving otherwise.

Renee Wittemyer, director of program strategy and investment at Pivotal Ventures —Melinda Gates’ investment and incubation company— says that women, and particularly women of color, “are being systemically left behind.” And, she adds, “these stats are moving at a glacial pace.” According to Wittemeyer, African American women and Hispanic women represent 3% and 1% of tech workers respectively.

There is an extensive underrepresentation of women in STEM fields. 

Women make up only 24 percent of the STEM workforce. To make matters worse, only 3 percent of Latina women are working in STEM fields. So these Latina innovators are worth celebrating. 

These scientists, biologists and engineers are making a social impact by solving many of the world’s most complex questions and threatening issues—from climate change to terminal illnesses to social problems.

Here are five Latina innovators shaking up the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) sphere and using technology to create a greater impact for the world:

Lucía Gallardo

technologyreview.es

Lucía Gallardo is the brain behind “Emerge,” a start-up that aims to solve social problems with emerging technologies, such as blockchain, Internet of things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI). “Through her company, Gallardo tries to bring these tools to people who work on social impact projects, especially in impoverished countries such as her native Honduras. One of Emerge’s main sources of support is women and marginalized communities, who are driven by both technology and advice,” MIT Technology Review writes.

María Alexandra Tamayo

technologyreview.es

This Colombian innovator, is purifying water in a country that has the second-most water resources but where only 8% of households have access to drinking water. This way, the biomedical engineer hopes to avoid diseases and death caused by water.

“This is how NanoPro was born, a device ‘capable of eliminating fungi, viruses and bacteria from water without affecting its taste, smell and color,’ the engineer explains. “The filter can be applied in both rural and urban populations, since it is incorporated both in faucets and in thermoses for those areas whose supply network does not reach homes.” With her invention, Tamayo hopes to democratize the access to drinkable water.

Marcela Torres

technologyreview.es

Marcela Torres wants to help refugees and immigrants in Mexico through “Holacode,” a software she developed to provide immigrants with access to employment and better integrate themselves into society. “Marcela Torres realized that in Mexico there were not enough people with the qualifications needed for the software developer positions that were open in the country, so she decided to use technology to solve the problem,” the MIT magazine wrote. “This is how ‘Holacode’ was born, a start-up that offers software development courses for the migrant community in Mexico.” Holacode offers coding and software courses for migrants in Mexico. The courses lasts five months, and with this start-up, Torres hopes that technology education can become more democratic and accessible. “The start-up allows these jobs to be filled by especially vulnerable people such as migrants.”

María Isabel Amorín

technologyreview.es

Amorín, 28-year-old Guatemalan chemist discovered an innovative way to clean sewage. On top of emissions and the excessive rate at which we are consuming resources, another great impact that global industrial activities have on the planet, is water pollution. In short, textile industries use a lot of chemical dyes for the production of clothing, which not only results in massive water waste but these chemicals can pollute rivers and other bodies of water. 

The Guatemalan chemist, Maria Isabel Amorin, “synthesized a polymer from shrimp shells that’s capable of retaining the dyes used in the textile industry.” According to the MIT Technology Review, “The filter works by recirculating and retaining the dye used to dye clothes. This project is particularly focused on artisanal textile production, since the technologies available to treat the waters are very expensive. Now, the young chemist is in the process of patenting her ecological method of filtration and hopes to scale production.”

Mariel Pérez Carrillo

technologyreview.es

This Mexican biochemical engineer and entrepreneur, helps farmers increase their crop production through Innus Technologies. Carillo recalled, “I went to the countryside to learn from the farmers and I realized that they don’t know how their crop is. They also don’t know what state their soil is in.” She invented Enviro, a device that identifies soil conditions and climate in real time and, from them, offers recommendations to improve crop yields.

Thanks to its sensors, Enviro can measure temperature, humidity, conductivity, pH and salinity. The device can help farmers reduce crop losses. Pérez affirms that Enviro also reduces the need of agricultural supplies, “which reduces the contamination of soil and aquifers caused by to excessive use of agricultural chemicals.” 

Aaron Hernandez’s Fiancée Opens Up About Netflix’s Speculation Over The Football Player’s Sexuality

Entertainment

Aaron Hernandez’s Fiancée Opens Up About Netflix’s Speculation Over The Football Player’s Sexuality

GMA / YouTube / droz / Instagram

“Killer Inside: The Mind Of Aaron Hernandez” is a new Netflix docu-series that explores the life of late football player Aaron Hernandez. The docu-series has sparked a lot of controversy over how the director explored Hernandez’s sexuality. Now, his family members are finally speaking out.

Aaron Hernandez’s brother spoke with Dr. Oz about the documentary highlighting his brother’s brain injuries.

Jonathan Hernandez was asked to help with the Netflix docu-series but turned down the offer because he didn’t feel right about it. However, he does think some part of the docu-series are important.

“I think there’s so much tragedy within this and things that can be gained for other people’s benefit that the dollar amount was the least significant thing,” Jonathan told Dr. Oz. “It’s more so what was at hand and what can we collectively do so someone who is growing up isn’t in this situation in the near future or down the road.”

Aaron’s fiancée also opened up about the docu-series and the tragedy surrounding Aaron.

Shayanna Jenkins also confirms that Netflix approached her for the docu-series and offered her compensation but she didn’t want to participate. Instead, she wanted to keep moving forward with her life.

“If he did feel that way or if he felt the urge, I wish that I — I was told,” Jenkins told ABC. “And I wish that he — you know, he would’ve told me ’cause I wouldn’t — I would not have loved him any differently. I would have understood. It’s not shameful and I don’t think anybody should be ashamed of who they are inside, regardless of who they love. I think it’s a beautiful thing, I just wish I was able to tell him that.”

Fans of Aaron are upset with the docu-series and how they handled themselves in the making of the show.

A lot of the show talks about Aaron’s perceived sexuality and how it factored into his crimes. The docu-series has been criticized for bringing up a very sensitive subject when Aaron is not around to defend himself.

The obsession with his sexuality is really upsetting people.

There is nothing wrong with someone’s sexuality. However, to attach a sexuality to a person who is dead is a low blow.

Out of all the noise surrounding Aaron, one person is being praised for their resilience.

Credit: @versaceclip / Twitter

What do you think about the docu-series about Aaron Hernandez and his life?

READ: New Investigative Report Reveals Aaron Hernandez’s Gay Relationship And His Erratic Behavior With NFL Players