Things That Matter

Telemundo Poll Reveals 25% Of Latinos Plan To Vote For Trump In 2020 And Twitter Has Opinions

Yes, como lo leen. But this should not surprise us in the least. One of the biggest misconceptions that the general population in the United States has is that the Latino population is a unique group with the same political inclinations. However, that is far, far from the truth. The Latino population is very diverse. The United States has enjoyed migration from about every single Latin American country. 

These migrants have moved to the United States for all sorts of reasons. Some have escaped guerrilla warfare, others fled communist regimes in Cuba and other countries and therefore align with more conservative candidates who hold a tough stance in international affairs. Other groups have been in the States from way back, when Arizona, New Mexico and other states were actually part of Mexico. Some of these Latino citizens are against immigration, wrongfully accusing new migrants of giving Latinos a bad name. Other Latinos are of course highly involves in activism and human rights issues.

The Latino vote is the Holy Grail of American politics today. Why? Simple: numbers. As USA Today reports: “About 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in 2020, compared with 30 million eligible black voters, according to the analysis”. 

25% of Latinos will likely vote for Trump. The Telemundo poll is raising eyebrows, but how surprising is it really?

Credit: LatinosForTrump20 / Instagram

The poll was conducted among 1,000 voters and has about 3.4% margin of error either way. The fact that a quarter of respondents would vote for Trump despite his borderline racist stance on immigration might seem like an unexpected revelation, but it shouldn’t be so. We gotta remember that in Florida, for example, some of the most influential groups are Cuban and Venezuelan exiles who despise the left-leaning governments in their countries. 

64% of Latinos wanna drive Trump out of the White House.

Credit: Equality Vote / Instagram

The poll also revealed that more than half of Latinos want Trump gone, while 11% remain indecisive. This might seem like a big win for Democrats, but the fact that some Latinos will still vote for Trump despite the ICE reign of terror during his administration could also be read as a big win for the former reality TV star.

Women, young people and those living on the West Coast push anti-Trump numbers up.

Credit: Equality Vote Now / Instagram

According to the poll, rejection to Trump among women sits at a 66% (he has never been much of a ladies’ man, particularly after the “grab them by the pussy” episode). 69% of under 50s want to say adiós to POTUS. Tellingly, among those living in the Pacific Coast 70% want him out, perhaps a response to his anti-immigration policies and his jurisdictional war against the state government of California. 

57% of Latinos support impeachment and 34% oppose it. This reflects the Latino congressional vote in 2018.

Of course the question in everyone’s mind is if Trump will even run in 2020 or if he will be impeached and removed from office. Of course impeachment is a lengthy and divisive process and we might not find out the political fate of the most powerful country on Earth until way into the election campaign.

But the majority of Latinos want the impeachment process to go ahead, perhaps due to the fact that they come from countries where impunity runs rampant and there are generally no repercussions for alleged instances of corruption. If the 2018 midterm elections were any indication of how Latinos are leaning in the 2020 election, this result reaffirms it. 

Among the potential Democratic candidates, Joe Biden takes the lead among Latinos.

Credit: JoeBiden.com

The other big question surrounding the election is who on Earth will run opposite Trump in 2020. The Democratic field is still wide open. However, as with national polls that take into account the whole of the population, former Vice President Joe Biden (a key figure in the whole impeachment drama) has the lead among Latinos with 26%, ahead of Bernie Sanders (18%) and Elizabeth Warren (10%). Some sectors of the Latino population are still resistant to the idea of a woman ruling over the Oval Office.

Julián Castro’s numbers among Latinos will surprise you.

Credit: Paul Deblois / Getty

Un mísero 2%! Yes, single digits for the one Latino candidate in the race. His campaign never really caught fire and it was perhaps a bit premature. However, we should not rule out a future run given his proven political resilience and his message of hope and inclusive policies. It just wasn’t his time yet.

Will we see more of him? This truly astonishing number comes even as Castro has made Latino engagement a cornerstone of his campaign. As USA Today reports: “Castro has made Latino and immigrant issues a cornerstone of his campaign. His first trip as a presidential candidate this year was to a Latino summit in Puerto Rico, and he has highlighted changes he would make to Trump’s immigration policies”. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

Things That Matter

From COVID To Elections, Here’s Why Misinformation Targets Latinos

One of the big surprises of the 2020 election was how even though most Latino voters across the U.S. voted for Joe Biden, in some counties of competitive states like Florida and Texas, a higher-than-expected percentage of Latinos supported Donald Trump. One factor that many believe played a role: online misinformation about the Democratic candidate.

Another important subject that’s been victim of a massive misinformation campaign is the Coronavirus pandemic and the ongoing vaccination program. But why does #fakenews so heavily target the Latino community?

Since the 2020 campaign, a large misinformation campaign has target Latinos.

Although fake news is nothing new, in the campaign leading up to the 2020 elections it morphed into something more sinister – a campaign to influence Latino voters with false information. The largely undetected movement helped depress turnout and spread disinformation about Democrat Joe Biden.

The effort showed how social media and other technology can be leveraged to spread misinformation so quickly that those trying to stop it cannot keep up. There were signs that it worked as Donald Trump swung large numbers of Latino votes in the 2020 presidential race in some areas that had been Democratic strongholds.

Videos and pictures were doctored. Quotes were taken out of context. Conspiracy theories were fanned, including that voting by mail was rigged, that the Black Lives Matter movement had ties to witchcraft and that Biden was beholden to a cabal of socialists.

That flow of misinformation has only intensified since Election Day, researchers and political analysts say, stoking Trump’s baseless claims that the election was stolen and false narratives around the mob that overran the Capitol. More recently, it has morphed into efforts to undermine vaccination efforts against the coronavirus.

The misinformation campaign could have major impacts on our politics.

Several misinformation researchers say there is an alarming amount of misinformation about voter fraud and Democratic leaders being shared in Latino social media communities. Biden is a popular target, with misinformation ranging from exaggerated claims that he embraces Fidel Castro-style socialism to more patently false and outlandish ones, for instance that the president-elect supports abortion minutes before a child’s birth or that he orchestrated a caravan of Cuban immigrants to infiltrate the US Southern border and disrupt the election process.

Democratic strategists looking ahead to the 2022 midterm elections are concerned about how this might sway Latino voters in the future. They acknowledge that conservatives in traditional media and the political establishment have pushed false narratives as well, but say that social media misinformation deserves special attention: It appears to be a growing problem, and it can be hard to track and understand.

Some believe that Latinos may be more likely to believe a message shared by friends, family members, or people from their cultural community in a WhatsApp or Telegram group rather than an arbitrary mainstream US news outlet; research has found that people believe news articles more when they’re shared by people they trust.

Fake news is also impacting our community’s response to the pandemic.

Vaccination programs work best when as many people as possible get vaccinated, but Latinos in the United States are getting inoculated at lower rates.

In Florida, for example, Latinos are 27% of the population but they’ve made up only about 17% of COVID-19 vaccinations so far, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. And Latinos are relying on social media and word-of-mouth for information on vaccines — even when it’s wrong. There’s myths circulating around the vaccine, whether you can trust it and the possible the long-term effects.

And it’s not just obstacles to getting information in Spanish, but also in many of the native Mayan indigenous languages that farmworkers speak in South Florida.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

California Brothers Kevin and Sean Carlo Cordon Were Just Arrested For Their Involvement in the Capitol Insurrection

Things That Matter

California Brothers Kevin and Sean Carlo Cordon Were Just Arrested For Their Involvement in the Capitol Insurrection

Screenshot via Ilta Sanomat

The FBI continues its work arresting folks who were involved in the January 6th Capitol insurrection. On Tuesday, the FBI arrested a pair of Latino brothers from Los Angeles–Kevin Cordon and Sean Carlo Cordon–for being involved in the violent capitol riot.

According to an FBI spokesperson, the FBI raided the homes of both Kevin Cordon and Sean Carlo Cordon and arrested them both on Tuesday.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the Cordon brothers were charged with “violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and other crimes stemming from the assault on the Capitol”.

The FBI first became alerted to the California brothers’ possible involvement in the insurrection through a video posted on a Finnish website. According to the FBI, they were tipped off to the brothers’ involvement in the insurrection by an anonymous tip from Finland. The FBI then used the Cordons’ flight and cell phone records to pinpoint the brothers’ locations before and after January 16th.

In the video, both brothers are being interviewed by a Finnish reporter on the day of the insurrection.

Kevin Cordon was wrapped in an American flag, his forehead bandaged and bloodied. Sean was in the background of the frame wearing a gas mask. The Cordon brothers make no secret of the fact that they were involved in illegal activity.

“There were people scuffling with the cops, and that’s when I got hit with a projectile — not sure what it was,” said Kevin Cordon. “And then from there, we proceeded into the broken windows and into the Capitol building.”

The Cordon brothers also made it clear where their political allegiances lie. “It’s clear that this election is stolen,” said Kevin to the Finnish publication.

“There’s just so much overwhelming evidence, and the establishment, the media, big tech are just completely ignoring all of it — and we’re here to show them we’re not having it,” he said. “We’re not just going to take this laying down.”

Kevin also added: “We’re standing up and we’re taking our country back. This is just the beginning.”

In the FBI’s sworn affidavit, the agency alleged that they have security footage of the Cordon brothers climbing through broken windows in the Capitol.

The arrest of the Cordon brothers is just another reminder that many Latinos supported the Trump administration as well. While some people on Twitter expressed surprise that the Cordon brothers were Trump supporters, it’s worth reminding everyone that 32% of Latinos voted for Trump.

Despite the common misconception out there that only “white people” supported Trump, the reality is, Trump’s base was made up of many ethnicities–including Latinos. Despite his largely anti-Latino rhetoric, Trump struck a chord with many different types of people.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com