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Telemundo Poll Reveals 25% Of Latinos Plan To Vote For Trump In 2020 And Twitter Has Opinions

Yes, como lo leen. But this should not surprise us in the least. One of the biggest misconceptions that the general population in the United States has is that the Latino population is a unique group with the same political inclinations. However, that is far, far from the truth. The Latino population is very diverse. The United States has enjoyed migration from about every single Latin American country. 

These migrants have moved to the United States for all sorts of reasons. Some have escaped guerrilla warfare, others fled communist regimes in Cuba and other countries and therefore align with more conservative candidates who hold a tough stance in international affairs. Other groups have been in the States from way back, when Arizona, New Mexico and other states were actually part of Mexico. Some of these Latino citizens are against immigration, wrongfully accusing new migrants of giving Latinos a bad name. Other Latinos are of course highly involves in activism and human rights issues.

The Latino vote is the Holy Grail of American politics today. Why? Simple: numbers. As USA Today reports: “About 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in 2020, compared with 30 million eligible black voters, according to the analysis”. 

25% of Latinos will likely vote for Trump. The Telemundo poll is raising eyebrows, but how surprising is it really?

Credit: LatinosForTrump20 / Instagram

The poll was conducted among 1,000 voters and has about 3.4% margin of error either way. The fact that a quarter of respondents would vote for Trump despite his borderline racist stance on immigration might seem like an unexpected revelation, but it shouldn’t be so. We gotta remember that in Florida, for example, some of the most influential groups are Cuban and Venezuelan exiles who despise the left-leaning governments in their countries. 

64% of Latinos wanna drive Trump out of the White House.

Credit: Equality Vote / Instagram

The poll also revealed that more than half of Latinos want Trump gone, while 11% remain indecisive. This might seem like a big win for Democrats, but the fact that some Latinos will still vote for Trump despite the ICE reign of terror during his administration could also be read as a big win for the former reality TV star.

Women, young people and those living on the West Coast push anti-Trump numbers up.

Credit: Equality Vote Now / Instagram

According to the poll, rejection to Trump among women sits at a 66% (he has never been much of a ladies’ man, particularly after the “grab them by the pussy” episode). 69% of under 50s want to say adiós to POTUS. Tellingly, among those living in the Pacific Coast 70% want him out, perhaps a response to his anti-immigration policies and his jurisdictional war against the state government of California. 

57% of Latinos support impeachment and 34% oppose it. This reflects the Latino congressional vote in 2018.

Of course the question in everyone’s mind is if Trump will even run in 2020 or if he will be impeached and removed from office. Of course impeachment is a lengthy and divisive process and we might not find out the political fate of the most powerful country on Earth until way into the election campaign.

But the majority of Latinos want the impeachment process to go ahead, perhaps due to the fact that they come from countries where impunity runs rampant and there are generally no repercussions for alleged instances of corruption. If the 2018 midterm elections were any indication of how Latinos are leaning in the 2020 election, this result reaffirms it. 

Among the potential Democratic candidates, Joe Biden takes the lead among Latinos.

Credit: JoeBiden.com

The other big question surrounding the election is who on Earth will run opposite Trump in 2020. The Democratic field is still wide open. However, as with national polls that take into account the whole of the population, former Vice President Joe Biden (a key figure in the whole impeachment drama) has the lead among Latinos with 26%, ahead of Bernie Sanders (18%) and Elizabeth Warren (10%). Some sectors of the Latino population are still resistant to the idea of a woman ruling over the Oval Office.

Julián Castro’s numbers among Latinos will surprise you.

Credit: Paul Deblois / Getty

Un mísero 2%! Yes, single digits for the one Latino candidate in the race. His campaign never really caught fire and it was perhaps a bit premature. However, we should not rule out a future run given his proven political resilience and his message of hope and inclusive policies. It just wasn’t his time yet.

Will we see more of him? This truly astonishing number comes even as Castro has made Latino engagement a cornerstone of his campaign. As USA Today reports: “Castro has made Latino and immigrant issues a cornerstone of his campaign. His first trip as a presidential candidate this year was to a Latino summit in Puerto Rico, and he has highlighted changes he would make to Trump’s immigration policies”. 

Julian Castro Says Kamala Harris Dropped Out Because Of An Unfair Media That Covers People Of Color Differently

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Julian Castro Says Kamala Harris Dropped Out Because Of An Unfair Media That Covers People Of Color Differently

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Kamala Harris is the most recent candidate to drop out of the presidential race, demonstrating that candidates of color have struggled to gain the same attention as their white counterparts. Cory Booker and Julian Castro have each made public pleas for donations when their campaigns nearly shuttered due to a lack of funds.

Castro released a video and spoke to BuzzFeed to defend Harris following three major news outlet’s exposés on her campaign. The former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development suggested that candidates of color are held to different standards by the media and their campaigns suffer because of it. 

Julian Castro says the media doesn’t treat candidates of color the same.

“The way the media has treated [Kamala Harris] has been something else. The way they’ve held her to a different standard, a double standard has been grossly unfair and unfortunate,” Castro said in a Twitter video. 

Following Kamala Harris’ decision to drop out of the presidential campaign, Julian Castro released a statement praising her campaign and suggesting it suffered because she was a woman of color.

“To me, they held her to a different standard, a double standard, to other campaigns. And I don’t know if it impacted her decision to withdraw from the race or not, but I’m sure it didn’t help,” Castro told BuzzFeed News

Castro’s campaign has similarly struggled to gain momentum in the race. A lack of support disqualified Castro from participating in the most recent debate. Moreover, his campaign nearly ended before a public ask for more donations to fund its continuation.

Castro suggested the media tried to smear Harris’ campaign.

“I was disappointed by the treatment her campaign got especially during the last seven days, when you had the Washington Post, New York Times, and Politico writing very gossipy-sounding big articles trashing the campaign,” Castro said.

The articles Castro referenced suggest Harris’ campaign struggled financially, was poorly managed and lacked direction. The pieces largely rely on anonymous sources who were campaign insiders.

“[Campaign manager Juan] Rodriguez faced criticism inside the campaign over his handling of finances and other issues. Multiple people affiliated with the campaign said its financial difficulties had forced recent cutbacks in advertising, travel and staffing,” according to the Washington Post

Over a dozen anonymous staffers told Politico Harris’ sister Maya Harris too often took the lead which only added insult to injury to Rodriguez’s poor leadership. A constant restructuring of positions, then later on layoffs, left campaigners feeling directionless. 

“Everybody has had to consolidate. Everybody has had to make cuts. And people are pissed. They see a void. They want to push someone out,” an aide told Politico.” And I understand that. But the root cause of all of this is that no one was empowered really to make the decisions and make them fast and make them decisively.”

However, Castro was critical of the sources used in the three articles and painted them as salacious attempts to takedown Harris. 

“Sourcing in journalism, just because somebody is willing to talk doesn’t mean that reflects a reality or that necessarily gives it front-page coverage in your publication,” Castro said. “Donald Trump was very willing to talk to journalists in 2015 and ‘16 and because of that journalists gave him a lot of coverage. There has to be more responsibility in the profession than that.”

Castro wants the DNC to reconsider the threshold to qualify for debates because candidates of color don’t get a fair shake from the press. 

Harris was able to qualify for the next debate while Castro was not. The debates required candidates to fundraise an increasing monetary goal, along with polling at a certain number in order to participate. If Tulsi Gabbard and Andrew Yang fail to qualify there may not be any candidates of color at the debate, while there will be at least one low-polling billionaire that many believe bought his way into the election. 

“I hope that the DNC will reevaluate its threshold,” Castro told BuzzFeeed. “What it’s resulting in is a lack of diversity on the debate stage. It’s also clear that some have been able to potentially buy their way on stage. I don’t think that was the original intention with putting thresholds like this in place, but we need to make sure that voters have the opportunity to hear from a range of candidates.”

Castro said the DNC and media prioritize white candidates and white voters. He has been critical of the fact that Democratic primaries favor states with disproportionately high white populations. 

“I actually believe that in addition to the white working class in the Midwest, we also need to be able to appeal to diverse communities in Detroit, Philadelphia, and Milwaukee if we want to win Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin,” he said. 

It’s Official, Kamala Harris Has Ended Her 2020 Campaign And Here’s What That Means For Voters

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It’s Official, Kamala Harris Has Ended Her 2020 Campaign And Here’s What That Means For Voters

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The Democratic Primary race has just gotten a little bit smaller with the departure of Senator Kamala Harris. The Senator from California, who was once considered a major front runner for the nomination, announced that she was ending her campaign on Tuesday.

News of her departure shook her supporters to their core, as well as those candidates who are continuing in the 2020 race.

Once considered a top tier candidate, Kamala Harris has ended her 2020 campaign.

Sen. Kamala Harris ended her 2020 presidential campaign on Tuesday, an abrupt departure for a candidate who was once seen as a leading contender for the Democratic nomination.

The California Democrat told her senior staff of the decision Tuesday morning, and later sent an email to supporters and released a video on Twitter. “To you my supporters, my dear supporters, it is with deep regret — but also with deep gratitude — that I am suspending our campaign today,” Harris said in the video.

“Eleven months ago at the launch of our campaign in Oakland I told you all: ‘I am not perfect.’ But I will always speak with decency and moral clarity and treat all people with dignity and respect. I will lead with integrity. I will speak the truth. And that’s what I have tried to do every day of this campaign. So here’s the truth today,” Harris wrote in a note to supporters. 

“I’ve taken stock and looked at this from every angle, and over the last few days have come to one of the hardest decisions of my life. My campaign for president simply doesn’t have the financial resources we need to continue .”

She is ending her presidential campaign after months of failing to lift her candidacy from the bottom of the field.

Still, the news came as a shock to some of her biggest supporters. Just as Harris was announcing the news internally, a super PAC had cleared more than $1 million in TV ads in Iowa to boost her struggling campaign. The ad, which argued she was the best-equipped candidate to take on President Donald Trump, was canceled.

Harris’ fall from the front of the pack has come as a surprise to many who supported her.

In January, Kamala Harris launched her presidential campaign in front of a crowd of more than 20,000 on a sunny afternoon in Oakland, California. 

The event felt like the beginning of something big – a presidential campaign with money, national organiZation and a young, charismatic candidate whose background was as diverse as the party she wanted to lead.

On the steps of Oakland’s City Hall, the former state attorney general and prosecutor from nearby San Francisco gave a speech full of lofty rhetoric, saying that the 2020 presidential election would be about the “right to moral leadership” of the entire planet.

Now her campaign won’t be around to see 2020, let alone the November general election.

Her campaign has seen plenty of ups and downs.

Once dubbed the “female Obama” by former Today Show anchor Matt Lauer, Harris’ campaign began on a promising note: Her kickoff rally in her hometown of Oakland drew more than 20,000 supporters who cheered wildly as she cast herself as the kind of fighter fit to take on a president like Trump.

Harris surged to near-front-runner status after a clash with Joe Biden in the June debate. She squandered the momentum she gained, however, with muddled responses to questions on healthcare policy. Her subsequent debate performances were lacklustre. She initially ignored, then made a belated push, to campaign in first-voting Iowa.

The senator did not end her campaign without a little shade throwing at her billionaire and self-funded rivals who entered the race late.

“I’m not a billionaire. I can’t fund my own campaign,” Harris said in a video explaining her decision to drop out. “And as the campaign has gone on, it has become harder and harder to raise the money we need to compete. In good faith, I can’t tell you, my supporters and volunteers, that I have a path forward if I don’t believe I do.”