Things That Matter

Ted Cruz’s Legal Team Believes That His Fight For $10,000 Is The Same As Rosa Parks’s Fight For Civil Rights

Rafael Edward “Ted” Cruz is currently in a lawsuit against the Federal Elections Committee (FEC) because of $10,000. The senator from Texas is up against a long standing rule that politicians can only pay out $250,000 from election funds after an election for personal loans. Sen. Cruz loaned his campaign $260,000 and is willing to compare himself to Rosa Parks in an attempt to recoup the last $10,000.

Texas Senator Rafael Edward “Ted” Cruz is fighting with the Federal Elections Committee over $10,000 he wants back from his campaign.

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The rule, which has been in affect since 2002, states clearly that no campaign can use campaign finances to repay more than $250,000 in personal loans. Sen. Cruz loaned his campaign $260,000 the day before the election in his race against Beto O’Rourke and now he wants the full amount back. However, because of the amount that he loaned the campaign and the FEC rule, he is out $10,000.

So, obviously, Cruz has suffered as great of injustice as Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks.

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As an elected official that has run multiple campaigns, Cruz should be aware of the rules related to campaign finances. It is a rule that has been on the books for over a decade. Regardless of that, it is a startling example of how far removed some politicians are to the true plights of people of color and minority communities.

Sen. Cruz comparing his inability to recoup an additional $10,00 from his campaign to the plight of Rosa Parks and the people fighting for civil rights is grotesque. The legal team representing Cruz in the lawsuit claim that by not allowing Cruz to break the rule while knowing the rule is akin to infringing on his First Amendment rights. Let’s be clear, it is not.

The comparison between Cruz and Parks is deplorable but people are no longer surprised at how low Cruz can go.

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Cruz is someone who has made a career out of shocking Americans with his words. However, this comment by his legal team over $10,000 he spent on a campaign is the lowest of the low. The Civil Rights movement is still trying to make strides to protect and preserve Black rights and lives. Trivializing the movement over a campaign finance dispute is unAmerican and demeaning to an entire population.

People are comparing Cruz’s ridiculous comment to the ridiculousness of tv show characters.

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Cruz’s legal team is fighting the FEC for the money after the FEC claimed that Cruz was indeed injured by Section 304. However, the injury sustained by the rule, the FEC argues, was “self-inflicted” since he made a loan higher than the allowed pay out the day before the election. Had Cruz loaned $250,000 to his campaign, he wouldn’t have to claim to be a civil rights martyr for campaign finance.

The shocking comparison comes at a time when Cruz has voiced anger at Trump’s detention centers being referred to as concentration camps.

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We can only hope that Cruz will realize the gross injustice in the words written by his legal team. An apology for the comparison would be the most respectable move in this series of events, however, it will likely never happen.

READ: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Considering Working Together To End Corruption In DC

Supreme Court Rules LGBTQ+ People Protected From Workplace Discrimination

Things That Matter

Supreme Court Rules LGBTQ+ People Protected From Workplace Discrimination

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The Supreme Court has ruled that companies cannot fire people for being part of the LGBTQ+ community. Before the ruling, it was still legal for employers to fire people for being part of the LGBTQ+ community. This is a major victory for LGBTQ+ Americans and a major loss for the Trump administration.

The Supreme Court of the United States ruled in favor of LGBTQ+ employees.

In a 6-3 ruling, the Supreme Court ruled that the LGBTQ+ community is protected by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Members of the LGBTQ+ community are protected from discriminatory firings and treatment for their sexual orientation or gender identity. The court’s decision states that the LGBTQ+ community is protected under Title VII of the act.

“An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex,” Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote in the decision. “It is impossible to discriminate against a person for being homosexual or transgender without discriminating against that individual based on sex.”

The decision was 6-3 in favor of protecting LGBTQ+ employees.

Conservative justice Clarence Thomas, Brett Kavanaugh, and Samuel A. Alito Jr all voted against protecting LGBTQ+ protections in the workplace. Justices John Roberts, Neil Gorsuch, Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan, and Stephen Breyer voted that the language of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does include LGBTQ+ people.

“There is only one word for what the court has done today: legislation. The document that the court releases is in the form of a judicial opinion interpreting a statute, but that is deceptive,” Alito wrote in the dissent. “A more brazen abuse of our authority to interpret statutes is hard to recall. The court tries to convince readers that it is merely enforcing the terms of the statute, but that is preposterous.”

The ruling protects millions of LGBTQ+ workers in states that offered no protection.

Before the ruling, employees in several states faced a constant threat of termination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The fear was greater for transgender people who had protections in fewer states than gay and lesbian workers. Justice Gorsuch did state the scope of the ruling.

“We do not purport to address bathrooms, locker rooms or anything else of the kind,” Justice Gorsuch wrote. “Whether other policies and practices might or might not qualify as unlawful discrimination or find justifications under other provisions of Title VII are questions for future cases, not these.”

The decision comes on a day that they also decided not to hear arguments in a case of qualified immunity for police.

It requires four justices to agree to allow for a case to be heard by the justices. Justice Thoms dissented the decision not to take up the case. The conservative justice claims that “qualified immunity doctrine appears to stray from the statutory text.”

Advocates want to see the qualified immunity doctrine to be revised. The doctrine currently makes it easy for lower courts to dismiss cases against police officers. Growing protests in the U.S. demanding a change in police reform after the death of George Floyd.

READ: Supreme Court Refuses Case Challenging California’s Sanctuary State Status

For Martin Luther King Day, Let’s Not Forget His Right Arm And Civil Rights Pioneer Coretta Scott King

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For Martin Luther King Day, Let’s Not Forget His Right Arm And Civil Rights Pioneer Coretta Scott King

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This year marks the centennial anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. To honor the many fearless and historical women who made strides for the rights of women and minorities, People magazine is looking back on them through a new series called #SeeHer Story. The new digital video series airs on PEOPLE.com and @PeopleTV social handles and is headed up by Katie Couric Media. 

This week, the new series has put a spotlight on the life and times of civil rights activist Coretta Scott King in honor of her husband Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. In the new video, the series highlights her work and contribution to the Civil Rights Movement and lifelong activist as a leader in her own right.

In the new series, King is hailed as a fearless leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

King, who had been born in 1927 in Marion, Alabama, has long been celebrated for her work as an author, activist and civil rights leader in the movement to advocate for African-American equality. Later in her life, years after her husband’s assassination, she broadened her fight for quality to include the advocacy of LGBTQ+ rights and the opposition of apartheid. 

Throughout her life, King faced racism but her eyes were opened to it at a young age as girl growing up in the south in the town of Marion, Alabama. As People reports, King was subjected to the physical threat of racism when her family home was destroyed by arsonists.

Education became a defining aspect of Coretta’s life. 

Having been born into a family whose paternal great-matriarch had been a former slave, education proved to be an essential requirement in her family home in her early ears. During a speech at Antioch College, Coretta once quoted her mother as having said, “My children are going to college, even if it means I only have but one dress to put on.” She went onto study political activism at Antioch University and later music at  New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. It was during her time as a student that Coretta met Martin Luther King, Jr., then a theology student. There, the two students bonded over their interest in Ghandi and his practice of nonviolent protests and the two later married in 1953. 

Soon after they wed, they moved to Montgomery and found themselves thrust into the Civil Rights Movement. 

By 1955, King and her husband had taken on leadership positions in the protests that came about after Rosa Parks protest. 

After giving up her dreams to become a classical singer so that she could support her husband, Coretta watched her husband become a full-time pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in 1954.

“We found ourselves in the middle of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Martin was elected leader of the protest movement. As the boycott continued, I had a growing sense that I was involved in something so much greater than myself,” Coretta said in the video created by People. During their fight for equality, King and her husband faced extreme acts of racism and violence. In 1955, just months after the birth of their child, Yolanda, the Kings were targeted when a gunshot went through the front door of their home. In 1956, the family’s  front porch was destroyed by a homemade bomb. At the time  Coretta had been home with her  daughter and a family friend. Two years later, in 1958 King’s husband, Martin, had been stabbed while he’d been signing copies of his book.

Still, the couple would not be deterred. The two stood side by side as her husband continued to lead peaceful protests and give  speeches. King herself led a series of her own demonstrations by conducting concerts.

Then, in 1968, Coretta’s husband was shot and killed. 

After her husband’s death,  King had been left a widow and the single mother of four children. In the years after her husband’s death, King gave speeches advocating for civil rights speaking about her husband’s ideals. Eventually King took up her husband’s torch and broadened her fight to include women’s rights, LGBTQ+ rights, economic issues, world peace and apartheid.

“The world is in dire need of a spiritual awakening which will make those eternal values of love, justice, mercy and peace meaningful in our time,” Coretta said of her work in the clip by People.

Later in her life, King founded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center and continued to extend her activism and worked to fight for nuclear disarmament. 

During her life and after it, Coretta has been celebrated for her work in keeping her husband’s legacy alive. She fought for the creation of Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, which thanks to King is observed today in all fifty states.