Things That Matter

Ted Cruz’s Legal Team Believes That His Fight For $10,000 Is The Same As Rosa Parks’s Fight For Civil Rights

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Rafael Edward “Ted” Cruz is currently in a lawsuit against the Federal Elections Committee (FEC) because of $10,000. The senator from Texas is up against a long standing rule that politicians can only pay out $250,000 from election funds after an election for personal loans. Sen. Cruz loaned his campaign $260,000 and is willing to compare himself to Rosa Parks in an attempt to recoup the last $10,000.

Texas Senator Rafael Edward “Ted” Cruz is fighting with the Federal Elections Committee over $10,000 he wants back from his campaign.

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The rule, which has been in affect since 2002, states clearly that no campaign can use campaign finances to repay more than $250,000 in personal loans. Sen. Cruz loaned his campaign $260,000 the day before the election in his race against Beto O’Rourke and now he wants the full amount back. However, because of the amount that he loaned the campaign and the FEC rule, he is out $10,000.

So, obviously, Cruz has suffered as great of injustice as Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks.

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As an elected official that has run multiple campaigns, Cruz should be aware of the rules related to campaign finances. It is a rule that has been on the books for over a decade. Regardless of that, it is a startling example of how far removed some politicians are to the true plights of people of color and minority communities.

Sen. Cruz comparing his inability to recoup an additional $10,00 from his campaign to the plight of Rosa Parks and the people fighting for civil rights is grotesque. The legal team representing Cruz in the lawsuit claim that by not allowing Cruz to break the rule while knowing the rule is akin to infringing on his First Amendment rights. Let’s be clear, it is not.

The comparison between Cruz and Parks is deplorable but people are no longer surprised at how low Cruz can go.

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Cruz is someone who has made a career out of shocking Americans with his words. However, this comment by his legal team over $10,000 he spent on a campaign is the lowest of the low. The Civil Rights movement is still trying to make strides to protect and preserve Black rights and lives. Trivializing the movement over a campaign finance dispute is unAmerican and demeaning to an entire population.

People are comparing Cruz’s ridiculous comment to the ridiculousness of tv show characters.

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Cruz’s legal team is fighting the FEC for the money after the FEC claimed that Cruz was indeed injured by Section 304. However, the injury sustained by the rule, the FEC argues, was “self-inflicted” since he made a loan higher than the allowed pay out the day before the election. Had Cruz loaned $250,000 to his campaign, he wouldn’t have to claim to be a civil rights martyr for campaign finance.

The shocking comparison comes at a time when Cruz has voiced anger at Trump’s detention centers being referred to as concentration camps.

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We can only hope that Cruz will realize the gross injustice in the words written by his legal team. An apology for the comparison would be the most respectable move in this series of events, however, it will likely never happen.

READ: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Considering Working Together To End Corruption In DC

These Surprising Facts Will Explain Why Latinos Ought To Celebrate Juneteenth

Things That Matter

These Surprising Facts Will Explain Why Latinos Ought To Celebrate Juneteenth

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Every year, June 19 marks the anniversary of the abolition of slavery in the state of Texas in 1865. The holiday has come to mean so much more, and now stands as a symbolic commemoration of the liberation of all enslaved African Americans in what used to be the Confederate States of America and is now the United States. June 19 is a cause for celebration, of course, but also an opportunity to question how far civil liberties for Black communities and other people of color have truly come. This is similar to the controversies in Latin America when it comes to celebrating various independence days. For example, did Independence Day in Mexico, which is celebrated on September 16, really mean something for indigenous communities that still live precariously and are seen as an ethnic minority? Or even still, should Latin Americans celebrate Columbus Day even if it was the beginning of brutal and unfair processes of colonization? History is a tricky beast: it is defined by wars and power struggles, and as such, holidays should always be questioned.

So Juneteenth is not short of controversy when it comes to defining its true power as a source of pride. It is common to read reports of the huge inequalities that still permeate everyday life in the United States in areas such as education, job opportunities and fairness in law enforcement. It is sadly common to see videos of police officers abusing young black men and women, sometimes to deadly extremes. Similarly, university education is a far away dream for many Black young people and for people of color in general.

Juneteenth is about love and sorrow, the terrible past and a promising future. For these reasons, Juneteenth has gained renewed importance today, when communities and historians are questioning whether the promise of freedom for African Americans was really fulfilled or if there are still miles to go to attain real equality and justice.

1. Does Juneteenth truly count as Independence Day?

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Juneteenth is also known as Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day. Celebrations include public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation and of the works of African-American literary giants such as Ralph Ellison and Maya Angelou. But the question remains: is July 4th a celebration for all Americans, or should Juneteenth be seen as the realization of the American Enlightenment ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity?

2. Some argue that Juneteenth is under-appreciated and needs to be a bigger deal.

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Some Twitter users bring up interesting debates regarding the celebration, claiming that young Black people should celebrate that first and then July 4th. A big part of African American identity has to do with honoring the ancestors, and Juneteenth is a great opportunity to reflect upon their many tribulations.

3. For 89 years after Independence Day slavery was still legal.

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Let that sink in: for almost nine decades millions of human beings were enslaved, even if the United States had gained its independence. Insta is full of interesting historical facts that are like una cubetada de agua fria, a wake up call that needs to be listed too. BTW, these colors are the Pan-African flag!

4. Following 1865: 89 more years of segregation.

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Some social media users remind us that the abolition of slavery did not bring equality. It was another 89 years before the civil rights movement gained traction and started to right the wrong of segregation. Yes, Black men and women were “free”, but not free to live where, how and when they wished. MLK and Rosa Parks were still a few decades away.

5. Juneteenth is an opportunity to ask ourselves: what is America?

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Particularly in the current political climate, full of divisive opinions, Juneteenth is a good opportunity to question the role of minorities in the country. Artist Del Starr echoes the now legendary video by Childish Gambino in which he enacts several key and often traumatic events of recent Black history.

6. Guess what? Not all states recognize Juneteenth as a holiday.

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It might seem crazy, but the states of Hawaii, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota do not recognize the date. The first one to recognize it was Texas in 1980. In other states, it is either a state holiday or a day of observance. It is not a federal holiday, however.

7. Juneteenth works to question and quash stereotypes.

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Wow, this is a powerful, assertive and totally true statement. For years, African Americans worked for free and today stereotypes harm their communities, but at the same time, job and educational opportunities are statistically lower for Black populations. That is just not OK.

8. Juneteenth is an opportunity to celebrate African heritage!

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African culture has influenced music, fashion and the arts in the United States and the whole continent for centuries. Juneteenth has been used as an opportunity to showcase African roots. Do you know what a dashiki is? Well, it is a gorgeous roomy shirt from West Africa. Get one and celebrate Juneteenth, whatever your ethnicity is.

9. Juneteenth is a way to express your identity and not follow others como borrego.

Credit: Twitter. @Rickee_Smith3rd

We love this photoshoot of Afro-beauty. The traditional red, black, yellow and green combination looks amazing. Salud for more teenagers like her who are proud of their heritage. Diversity is to be celebrated rather than hidden.

10. City councils are getting it: this needs to be a loud, proud celebration

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Atlanta is echando la casa por la ventana from June 14-16. We encourage you to find what your local council is doing and get your pride up and running!

11. Black politicians are a testament to the progress that has been made.

Credit: Twitter. @MayorByronBrown

Black men and women who have been elected into a position of power have made sure that Black identity is celebrated. Byron Brown, Buffalo’s first African American mayor, raised the Pan-African flag as part of the Juneteenth Festival.

12. Cultural institutions also work as a hub for all things Juneteenth.

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Check your local museum’s webpage for Juneteenth events. The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, for example, is hosting an incredible festival. No te lo puedes perder.

13. A happy coincidence: Pride Month and Juneteenth go hand in hand!

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In one of those cases in which the stars align, Juneteenth and Pride Month are so close together that Black queers have taken it as an opportunity to double their celebration of pride. It is ALWAYS a good idea to scream to the world: “This is who we are and we love it!”.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Considering Working Together To End Corruption In DC

Things That Matter

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ted Cruz Are Considering Working Together To End Corruption In DC

The country is divided; this notion is nothing new or surprising. With liberals and conservatives fighting over abortion rights, government corruption, immigration reform issues (to name a few), the county is in desperate need of some unity — and we’re definitely not getting it from Democrat or Republican lawmakers.

There is a slight shift happening, and we’re hoping it leads to big things.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ted Cruz are on the same page about a crucial governmental issue.

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Cruz are both agreeing that former lawmakers should not be lobbying on behalf of corporation soon after leaving their office.

According to NPR, “at least 187 political appointees of the Trump administration previously worked as federal lobbyists…many of them were put into positions supervising the same industries for which they had once lobbied. Furthermore, “Senators who leave office cannot become lobbyists for two years, under a law that was adopted in 2007. In the House, representatives face a one-year cooling-off period.”

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Cruz would like to see that period extended.

The discourse between the two Latino lawmakers began — where else — on Twitter.

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez’s tweet was in response to a story that showed 2/3 of former members of Congress were now working as lobbyists and strategic consultants. This switch from public service to corporate handler can be seen as an ethics issue, which is why there are some current laws in place.

Sen. Cruz responded to Rep. Ocasio-Cortez saying that he was surprised to say that he agreed with a Democrat.

Sen. Cruz doubled down saying that he’s been fighting not only to restrict former lawmakers from becoming lobbyists but to also ban them for life. He also said that his fellow Republican colleagues would probably not support the idea that he would be working with a Democrat, especially one as outspoken as Rep. Ocasio-Cortez.

The two decided to work together on a bill to restrict former lawmakers from working as lobbyists and already have support from their respective parties.

According to NBC News, within hours two lawmakers agreed to work on the bill alongside the Latino lawmakers.

Talk about a miracle!

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