Things That Matter

South Dakota Won’t Change Their ‘Meth, We’re On It’ Anti-Drug Campaign

South Dakota revealed its new anti-drug campaign, complete with a new slogan that rolls right off the tongue: “Meth, we’re on it.” The phrase is supposed to be clever, at least that’s what Governor Kristi Noem probably hoped. “We’re on it,” is meant to suggest the state is on curbing the use of the drug, but instead the advertisements which feature the slogan with zero context, and tell the viewer to visit www.OnMeth.com, might give the wrong impression. 

The tagline was inevitably roasted and criticized on Twitter. Noem doubled-down on the campaign suggesting that the backlash was evidence it worked because people were talking about it or as some would say, “haters is how you know you’re shining,” — truly a governing principle of our politics these days. 

North Dakota unleashed the ironic anti-drug campaign and Twitter snapped.

The campaign cost $449,000 of taxpayer money, some of which was paid to Broadhead Co. the ad agency that came up with the tagline, according to the Sioux Falls Argus Leader. The intention is to bring attention to the state’s meth epidemic using television ads, billboards, and posters, along with the website. The photo ads feature all kinds of people, including children, saying, “I’m on meth.” The same phrase is repeated in a television ad as well. It is hard not to laugh no matter how serious the issue is.  

 “[The campaign will create] a movement for all South Dakotans to take an active role in keeping their state a great place to live,” according to the proposal by Broadhead.

As soon as the campaign launched plenty of people on Twitter started having fun with it.

Some Twitter users created some “new” anti-drug campaigns for South Dakota with ironic phrases like, “Heroin. We’re up in arms,” and “MDMA. We feel you.” 

Other users “blamed the intern.”

Others roasted the fact that South Dakota even trademarked the phrase.

Regardless of how funny, Noem stands by the campaign and considers all the jokes a part of its success story. 

Governor Noem defends “Meth. We’re on it.”

“Meth is IN SD. Twitter can make a joke of it, but when it comes down to it – Meth is a serious problem in SD. We are here to Get. It. OUT,” Noem tweeted. 

South Dakota has struggled to address the growing meth epidemic in the state where 12 to 17-year-olds use meth at rates higher than the national average. Noem requested over $1 million in funding to expand meth treatment services and $730,000 for school-based preventions. 

“South Dakota’s anti-meth campaign launch is sparking conversations around the state and the country,” Noem told the Washington Post. “The mission of the campaign is to raise awareness — to get people talking about how they can be part of the solution and not just the problem. It is working.”

In the state, meth use isn’t just a public health issue it is also a criminal justice matter that has seen many South Dakotans imprisoned. Some state officials are notably enthusiastic about it. 

“The campaign is inclusive and empowering and establishes a movement for all South Dakotans to take an active role in keeping our state a great place to live,” Laurie Gill, head of the state’s Department of Social Services, said in a statement. “We’re encouraging everyone to work together to eliminate meth.”

However, there are some serious detractors of the campaign efficacy. 

Assistant Dean at the University of California at Berkeley’s Haas School of business was critical of the slogan.

“I can’t imagine this is what they intended to do; any good marketer would look at this and say: ‘Yeah, let’s not do that,’” Pearce told the Washington Post. “I’m sure South Dakota residents don’t like being laughed at. That’s what’s happening right now.”

Pearce was skeptical of the campaign’s ability to reach the intended person, even if it does go viral on the internet. 

“This is not about trying to find people in the tough parts of town that are hiding from society and using meth,” he said. “This is about telling everyone in the state: ‘I know we’ve got a problem, and I’m addressing it.’ Nobody thought about the ramifications. The Twitter reactions are hysterical.”

Associate Professor for advertising at Syracuse University Beth Egan voiced similar reservations recognizing that regardless of the ad’s intention people are going to dictate how its interpreted. 

“One of the things that struck me is, obviously everyone gets the play on words, they’re trying a twist. But what they’re missing is that advertisers no longer have control over the conversation. You need to be mindful of how consumers are gonna take it and run with it in their own way, Egan said.  

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Cardi B And Sister Sued Over Video Claiming To Show ‘Racist MAGA Supporters’

Entertainment

Cardi B And Sister Sued Over Video Claiming To Show ‘Racist MAGA Supporters’

iamcardib / Instagram / @iamcardib / Twitter

Cardi B and her sister are being sued for defamation of character after a viral video taken by Hennessy Carolina Almánzar. The video shows two men, one wearing a MAGA hat, and one woman telling Hennessy to move her car, which is parked on the beach.

Earlier this month, Cardi B shared a video taken by her sister showing a confrontation over where a car was parked.

Cardi B, who is notorious for having widely broadcast Twitter feuds with people, posted the video in response to a tweet from Candace Owens. Owens is a controversial conservative figure whose brand is all about shock and awe. Owens famously said she thinks it would be okay if “Hitler just wanted to make Germany great and have things run well.”

Immediately, there was skepticism about the incident since the video starts during the confrontation.

Responding to nay-sayers, Cardi B shared a video of her sisters voice messages sent to her IG DMs. Hennessy claims in the messages that the white men were the aggressors against her and her girlfriend while they were on the beach.

The videos did not convince some people that her sister wasn’t in the wrong.

Cardi B’s tweet is filled with responses questioning the video and denying its authenticity. The argument immediately turned political because of the mention of Trump and Trump supporters. The conversation on Twitter is divided among people who believe Cardi B and her sister and those who don’t.

Now, Cardi B and Hennessy are being sued by the beachgoers in the video.

“These peaceful Suffolk County residents were quietly enjoying a Sunday at the Smith Point beach with their families, when rap celebrity Hennessy Carolina suddenly approached them, raging, spitting, insulting, assaulting, defaming and threatening them, all the while videotaping them because one of them wore a MAGA hat,” beachgoers’ Miller Place attorney John Ray said, according to ABC7NYC.

The lawsuit claims defamation of character because of the language used in the video against them.

According to Billboard, plaintiffs Peter Caliendo, Pauline Caliendo, and Manuel Alarcon claim that they had approached Hennessy and her girlfriend, Michelle Diaz, blocked them in with how she parked her car. The lawsuit states that the men asked for Diaz to move her car and that’s when Hennessy started to record the video and hurl names and insults at them.

This story is developing and mitú will be updating as the story unfolds.

READ: Cardi B Is, Once Again, Fed Up With Trolls Trying to Body Shame Her With Edited Photos

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Peeing On Escalators: The Curiously Gross Case Of Mexico City’s Subway System

Culture

Peeing On Escalators: The Curiously Gross Case Of Mexico City’s Subway System

ThatGayGringo / Instagram

Mexico City subway users often complain about malfunctioning escalators that keep breaking down continually. In any given CDMX metro station, you’ll find that escalators are out of order more often than they are functioning. And city officials have offered an explanation that shocked no one—people are peeing on them so much that escalators are corroding. Yup, you read that right.

Of the system’s 467 escalators, 22 are out of service on any given day.

Travelers on the Mexico City subway system often blame authorities for broken-down escalators at subway stops, but Metro officials have another explanation. Somehow, urine is penetrating and corroding the drive wheels and mechanisms of the escalators that carry riders up from underground stations.

One-quarter of escalator breakdowns on the Mexico City Metro are caused by people urinating on them, according to authorities.

The deputy manager of mechanical installations, Fermín Rafael Ramírez Alonso, said that Tacubaya and Chabacano are among the most affected stations.

Maybe—just maybe— stop peeing on escalators?

Ramírez urged users not to urinate on escalators or other Metro installations, because of the damage it causes. “When we open up escalators for maintenance, there is always urine,” Ramírez said.

But another issue is that there are no public bathroom facilities available.

Most stations have no public bathroom facilities, a fact Twitter users were quick to point out, noting there are not even any pay toilets. “More than this being an issue about ethics or manners, I think that this is happening because of a lack of free and accesible bathrooms in the city,” tweeted one user.

Ramirez also said that other causes for breakdowns include excessively heavy loads, running on the stairs, imbalance on the stairs and objects falling between them.

“There are even users who cut the stairs with knives or other sharp objects, of which we have examples in Tacubaya,” he said, surprising absolutely not one of Mexico City’s users. Many metro users know that vendors even sell knives on subway carriages, as was noted by this tweet.

The biggest problem, subway authorities admit, is that many escalators are old, or have been damaged by rough use.

The city plans to replace about 55 escalators over the next two years. With over 1.6bn rides per year, the Mexico City subway is considered the eighth largest in the world by some measures, and one of the cheapest: a 25¢ ticket will get you a single ride to any destination on the 140-mile (226km) system. Just remember to use the bathroom before setting out.

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