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Selena Gomez And Her Cast Get Tattoos To Bring Awareness To An Issue People Are Afraid To Address

@tommy.dorfman / Instagram

Selena Gomez and the cast of her latest Netflix project got matching tattoos over the weekend that holds significance to “13 Reasons Why.” The Netflix show is based on a best-selling book by Jay Asher that dives into the topic of teenage suicide and mental health, according to an entry on IMDB. The tattoos chosen by the cast have been a powerful symbol in the awareness of mental health issues and suicide prevention: the semicolon.

Over the weekend, Selena Gomez, Alisha Boe, and Tommy Dorfman got matching semicolon tattoos.


The tattoos were inspired by Project Semicolon which is an organization focused on raising awareness about suicide and mental health issues. The founder, Amy Bleuel, recently lost her won battle with depression. Bleuel started Project Semicolon in 2013 after her father committed suicide and hoped it would serve as inspiration for others facing their own battle with suicide. The semicolon took to represent how your story is not done and that what is happening now is only a continuation of your story.

The semicolon, much like its grammatical use, represents a continuation, not an end, for those dealing with thoughts of suicide, mental health issues, self-injury, and depression.

Today was a magical day. Another day to be grateful to be alive. Alisha, Selena, and I went together to get ; tattoos. The ; symbol stands for an end of one thought and a beginning of another. Instead of a period, authors use the semicolon to continue a sentence. For us, it means a beginning of another chapter in life, in lieu of ending your life. I struggled with addiction and depression issues through high school and early college. I reached out and asked for help. At the time, I thought my life was over, I thought I'd never live past the age of 21. Today I'm grateful to be alive, in this new chapter of life in recovery, standing with my colleagues and friends, making art that helps other people. If you're struggling, if you feel suicidal, I urge you to click the link in my bio. Ask for help. Start a new chapter with the support of others. ?⛅️?☀️and RIP Amy Bleul, who started the semicolon movement.

A post shared by TOMMY DORFMAN (@tommy.dorfman) on


“Instead of a period, authors use the semicolon to continue a sentence. For us, it means a beginning of another chapter in life, in lieu of ending your life,” Dorfman wrote on Instagram. “I struggled with addiction and depression issues through high school and early college. I reached out and asked for help. At the time, I thought my life was over, I thought I’d never live past the age of 21. Today I’m grateful to be alive, in this new chapter of life in recovery, standing with my colleagues and friends, making art that helps other people.”

The show is striking a chord with young viewers giving it great reviews and 90 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.


For Gomez, being a part of the project is personal. Not only was she a fan of the book, but Gomez herself recently had a very public battle with symptoms of her own mental health issues.

“I think he [Jay Asher] understood that I knew what it meant to be bullied,” Gomez told The New York Times about optioning the rights to Asher’s story. “I went to the biggest high school in the world, which is the Disney Channel. And my mom had a lot of history dealing with [bullying]. I heard her stories growing up. She’s very open about it.”

If you or someone you know needs help, reach out to your local authorities (911) or call 1-800-273-8255 (TALK).


READ: Selena Gomez Cancels ‘Revival’ Tour And Checks Into Rehab Due To ‘Mental Health’

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After His Son Was Bullied John Leguizamo Learned All About Latino History To Teach His Son To Be Proud

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After His Son Was Bullied John Leguizamo Learned All About Latino History To Teach His Son To Be Proud

Joan Marcus / Playbill

In a Vogue interview last week, John Leguizamo reveals he’s been working for four years to bring his newest show “Latin History For Morons,” currently on a run at the Public Theater in New York City, to fruition. The one-man show, that Leguizamo says he’s been prepping for his whole life, came out of brushing up on his own Latino history in order to help educate his son who was being bullied for being Latino at the time. He wanted his son to “feel proud of their background,” he said in the Vogue interview.

John Leguizamo’s new show spans the entirety of Latino history.


Starting from the Maya all the way to the “Age of Pitbull.” Toma!


Leguizamo says he’s been prepping for his new one-man show “Latin History For Morons” his whole life.

Credit: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert / Youtube

“I guess my whole life has been preparing me for this show in a lot of ways. I’ve had a lot of those fights growing up, even now on Twitter. And then when my son got bullied, I couldn’t believe it was still going on, even for my kids. It was shocking to me.”

He resents never being taught Latino history in school. Of his education, he says “When I was studying the Civil War, there was nothing about everything we did, not one mention of any participation or contribution, ever. And it would’ve changed my life.”


Leguizamo says “You just hear the craziest shit,” when discussing inequality in Hollywood, where someone told him Latinos just want to watch white people on screen.

Via: KUSH Comedy / Youtube / Giphy

Da fuq?!

When asked about his New York Times op-ed, where he discusses his very own agent telling him “John, you’re so talented but too bad you’re Latin — otherwise you’d be so much further along.” He says “You just hear the craziest shit.” He recalls an interaction with a studio head who told him “Well, you know Latin people don’t really like to see Latin people. They like to see white people.”


But, Leguizamo, is also optimistic and thinks some things are changing.

Johnny Legs Quote
Via: micdotcom / Tumblr

Although he acknowledges the inequality and negativity associated in the on-screen portrayal of Latinos, especially as “POTUS 45” (as he refers to President Trump) has fostered the environment to perpetuate those stereotypes, he says that the behind-the-scenes roles are much more promising as Latinos move into producing and directing.


Leguizamo recognizes the theater is a better place to bring politically charged content to life.

On why he often prefers theater to film and TV, he brings up his fellow Broadway show hitmaker Lin-Manuel Miranda and the success of his show “Hamilton,” Leguizamo says:

“Where did Hamilton happen? It didn’t happen in movies and television, because it couldn’t. “So we’re going to do a historic piece on Hamilton and everyone is going to be black and Latin playing our forefathers.” They would say: “But wait, they didn’t speak hip-hop in the 1700s?” It would’ve never happened! But where did it happen? On Broadway, in the theater.”


Here’s an interview he did back in October discussing how ignorant we all are about Latino history.

Credit: The Late Show with Stephen Colbert / Youtube

I could watch these two all day.


Here’s how you can help John Leguizamo fund “Latin History For Morons.”

[H/T:] John Leguizamo Is Here to Explain Latino History for You

READ: John Leguizamo Just Put Everyone On Blast With New York Times Essay


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