Things That Matter

The SAT Is Adding An “Adversity Score” That Will Take Socioeconomic Status Into Account During College Testing

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College-bound students taking their SATs will soon be assigned an adversity score, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The College Board, the nonprofit that oversees the standardized test, said it would implement what it calls the “Environmental Context Dashboard,” which would measure the student’s social and economic backgrounds to better capture their “resourcefulness to overcome challenges and achieve more with less.”

“There is talent and potential waiting to be discovered in every community — the children of poor rural families, kids navigating the challenges of life in the inner city, and military dependents who face the daily difficulties of low income and frequent deployments as part of their family’s service to our country,” David Coleman, chief executive officer of the College Board, said in a statement. “No single test score should ever be examined without paying attention to this critical context.”

The score factors in aspects like a student’s home and neighborhood environment, like the crime level, the median family income and family stability, as well as the high school’s average senior class size, the percentage of students eligible for free and reduced lunches and the academic achievement in Advanced Placement classes.

The data will be gathered from records like the US census and the National Center for Education Statistics. From there, students will be scored on a scale of 1 to 100, where 50 would be considered average and any number above that points to additional hardship.

Only colleges where students have applied, not the applicants themselves, will be able to see the scores.

According to CNN, the Environmental Context Dashboard has been piloted at 50 colleges and universities. They hope to expand it to more institutions in the next year.

“This [adversity score] is literally affecting every application we look at,” Jeremiah Quinlan, the dean of undergraduate admissions at Yale University, one of the schools that has used the adversity score, told the Wall Street Journal. “It has been a part of the success story to help diversify our freshman class.”

The new score comes amid a college admissions scandal. In March, it was revealed that several celebrity and wealthy parents were paying their children’s way into elite universities. Some parents paid bribes to have the SAT taken by other students.

But the problem of inequitable college admissions extends back much longer. The College Board says it has been concerned about income inequality influencing SAT results for several years. In 2018, for instance, white students scored better on average than Black and Latinx students, while Asian students scored higher on average than white students. They also found that children of parents who are wealthy and college-educated typically score higher than their peers.

“We can’t sit on our hands and ignore the disparities of wealth reflected in the SAT,” Coleman said.

Read: If Aunt Becky Isn’t Paying For You To Be Admitted Into College, Try These Latino-Specific Scholarships And Studying For Your SATs

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A Viciously Racist Video Has Gone Viral In Which Two Girls Call For The Return Of Slavery And The KKK

Things That Matter

A Viciously Racist Video Has Gone Viral In Which Two Girls Call For The Return Of Slavery And The KKK

@mrsmeliwilson / Twitter

Another day, another racist video uploaded to the Internet. In the latest bigoted clip to go viral, two young white women from Illinois chant about how much they hate Black people and call for the return of slavery.

On Saturday, Springfield, Illinois, resident Gabbi Goldsborough posted a video on Facebook of friends Macy Castleman and Jayde Landers going on a wild rant about their deep hatred toward Black people. The 10-second clip, a screengrab of another video posted August 9 or 10 on Snapchat by user Sam Stieren, shows the women outdoors calling for a return to the times when Black folk were not considered human and were enslaved and brutalized. 

“We hate n*****s,” the pair say in unison.

Castleman, who appears in the video wearing a dark-color hoodie, added: “They smell. They don’t work. So we should bring back slavery to whip them n*****s. Bring back the KKK! Wooooo!”

Landers, who is seen in a light-color sweatshirt, then says, “Shh. People like Black people sometimes.”

The video, as can be expected, has validly angered many on the Internet.

“Love how people sit around and act like racism isn’t still a thing. Macy Castleman and Jayde Landers, you have a lot of explaining to do,” Goldsborough writes in her video post on Facebook. “You can say it’s an inside joke or think it’s funny, but it’s not.”

Along with the clip, the young woman, who is biracial, also published private chats she had with Castleman, which shows her unapologetic about video and calling it a joke that she doesn’t have much recollection of.

“That was like three years ago and, if I’m being honest, I don’t remember that at all,” Castleman responds when Goldsborough inquires about the contents of the video through a Snapchat message.

After Goldsborough calls it “fucked up,” Castleman gets defensive. 

“I have Black people in my family. Clearly, I don’t feel that way … so you can chill. Also, it was an inside joke with my best friend. But feel however you want about it,” she says.

While the video’s timestamp shows it was posted last week, it could have been recorded previously and added to Snapchat as a “throwback” or “memory” more recently.

In her post, Goldsborough points out that the timing of the recording is nonessential; what the young women say in the video is what’s damning.

“Honestly, I don’t care when you said it. I don’t care if you said it five years ago. The N-word still came out of your mouth, and there’s no excuse. Period. On behalf of my Black side, we’re hurt and so disappointed people still think and believe this,” she said, adding that if Castleman’s claims of having Black relatives are true, they would be really disappointed in her.

In addition to the public outcry, both Castleman and Landers are beginning to also face real-life repercussions for their racist rant. 

Castleman, who is seen in the video yelling most of the vile commentary, has been fired from her job at an assisted living facility. On Facebook, the Concordia Village and Lutheran Senior Services addressed the video and their former employee’s involvement twice. 

In a post made on Monday, they announce that Castleman was dismissed.

“A disturbing video posted on a personal social media account by a former employee over the weekend has come to our attention. We are disappointed by the personal views expressed by this former employee and regret the adverse attention it has brought upon our community. We have addressed the situation with the employee according to our personnel policies and that individual is no longer employed by Concordia Village or Lutheran Senior Services,” they wrote.

When commenters asked if the company had fired Castleman, they responded that they had.

Both institutions where the women attend, or were previously registered in, have also commented on the videos.

Auburn High School, where Sanders is a senior, made a brief statement on its Twitter account.

“The behavior of the two individuals in the video does not represent the views of our school or our community – what we teach or how we act in our school. There are policies and procedures in place, which will be followed for any students involved,” the school noted in the statement made on Sunday.

One community member, Eileen P McLaughlin, isn’t satisfied. She suggested that the teen be suspended or expelled, noting that not giving the young woman consequences to her actions would leave a “dark stain on your school.”

The Auburn Community Unit School District #10 said it has started an investigation into the video but indicated that the process has been difficult because the video was released publically while school is still on summer break.

Similarly, Lincoln Land Community College, the school where Castleman was enrolled as a nursing student, posted a statement on Sunday to their Facebook.

“In light of a situation brought to the attention of the college administration, I would like to assure our community that Lincoln Land Community College is committed to maintaining a learning and working environment that is free from all forms of harassment and discrimination,” President Dr. Charlotte Warren on Sunday. “LLCC values diversity. We respect and celebrate the differences among people, cultures and ideas. We recognize the inherent dignity and worth of everyone throughout the college community. We promote a safe and inclusive environment for all.” 

Warren added: “… If this situation involved a current student at LLCC, then it would be investigated and adjudicated per the policies and procedures of the College.”

Both Castleman and Landers have either set their social media to private or deactivated their accounts.

Read: Two Racist Florida Women Are Caught On Video Telling A Puerto Rican Man To ‘Go Back To Mexico’ If He Wants To Speak Spanish

We Haven’t Fully Recovered From The Frustration And Anger With The Aunt Becky College Scandal But Lifetime Is Already Working On A Movie

Entertainment

We Haven’t Fully Recovered From The Frustration And Anger With The Aunt Becky College Scandal But Lifetime Is Already Working On A Movie

Lifetime is gearing up to immortalize the epic college admissions scandal into our digital zeitgeist and release a two-hour movie this fall. The movie will highlight two mothers obsessed with getting their children into elite colleges and the consequences of their actions as they unfold. Audiences are hoping the movie will feature the lives of Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin — the two most famous women involved in the scandal.

As juicy as it will be to see the dramatization, there’s another layerLori Loughlin, also known as Aunt Becky from “Full House,” was on Lifetime’s payroll until the network terminated their contract after the scandal erupted.

The network does not plan to hold back.

@DrakeBeTheTypa / Twitter

In a statement released by A+E Networks, College Admissions Scandal will center “on the story that captivated a nation where over 50 privileged and elite individuals from across the country were exposed for criminally conspiring to influence the undergraduate admissions decisions at some of America’s top schools.”

The Internet is assuming this movie will focus on Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin.

@runningjoke / Twitter

While there were plenty of high-profile names involved in the scandal, including several fathers, the Internet is taking a cue from A+E’s own description of the movie. According to A+E, “College Admissions Scandal will follow two wealthy mothers who share an obsession with getting their teenagers into the best possible college.”

“When charismatic college admissions consultant Rick Singer offers a side door into the prestigious institutions of their dreams, they willingly partake with visions of coveted acceptance letters in their heads. But when Singer cooperates with the FBI and pleads guilty, the mothers who risked everything for their kids, must face the consequences of their crimes and the loss of trust and respect from their families.”

Here’s a breakdown of the charges.

@historyjk / Twitter

Felicity Huffman pled guilty to paying $15,000 to boost her daughter’s SAT scores. Huffman and husband, William H. Macy, are parents to Sofia Grace Macy. Since the chaos, Sofia has put her college plans on hold, taking at least a year off.

Ironically, Felicity Huffman has previously played the role of a criminally-minded mother on screen.

@swim24 / Twitter

Huffman is best known for her role as Lynette in Desperate Housewives. During Season 1, she “donates” $15,000 to an elite private school to get her twin boys accepted. During a tour of the school, the headmaster suggests that they make a generous donation to secure the spot, so the family sells their boat and the boys go off to school. 🤯

Meanwhile, Lori Loughlin has pled “not guilty” to a much bigger charge.

@THR / Twitter

Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, were both indicted on fraud and money laundering charges for paying $500,000 to “admissions consultant” Rick Singer. The donation went to Singer’s nonprofit organization, Key Worldwide Foundation, which prosecutors are alleging is just a front for accepting bribes.

Loughlin’s two daughters, Olivia Jade and Isabella Rose, were designated as crew team recruits for USC, though they’ve never played crew, and are not listed on the USC women’s rowing roster. If convicted, Loughlin and Giannulli could spend up to 20 years in prison on each charge.

The television network may have already released the names of the cast.

@davidmackau / Twitter

Currently, all the Internet can think about is who will be cast to play who. While some are rooting for their favorite actresses, others don’t want them dragged into this mess.

Writer, Stephen Tolkin, has already co-created a series with Loughlin.

@SarahWatson42 / Twitter

Tolkin and Loughlin co-created Summerland together. That time, Loughlin’s character was the hero raising her niece and nephews after their parents die. This time, Tolkin may be using his intimate working relationship with Loughlin to depict her character on screen. It is to be determined if Tolkin be objective in this new movie.

By the time the movie is released, the public should know whether Loughlin is guilty or innocent.

@TheHEartBroke / Twitter

Still, many students, especially first-generation students, are left with loan debt and a decreasing number of opportunities for college graduates.

Despite obstacles, Latinos and POC have been getting into college without help from SAT rigging and privilege.

According to the Pew Research Center, there are fewer and fewer Latino students going to college. In fact, despite how rapidly the Latino community is growing in the U.S., a widening education gap lands us at half as likely to hold a college degree as non-Latino white adults according to The Education Trust.

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