Things That Matter

These Are The 10 People Killed During The Santa Fe High School Shooting In Texas

It’s been less than a week since the deadly shooting at Santa Fe High School that left 10 people dead and many others injured. Now we’re learning more about the victims that were tragically killed on May 18 at their school in Santa Fe, Texas.

Those people were Jared Black, 17, Shana Fisher, 16, Aaron Kyle McLeod, 15, teacher Glenda Anne Perkins, 64, Pakistani exchange student Sabika Sheikh, 17, Christopher Stone, 17, teacher Cynthia Tisdale, 63, Kimberly Vaughan, 14, Christian Riley Garcia, 15, and Angelique Ramirez, 15.

Ten people, eight students and two teachers, were killed in Santa Fe High School on May 18.

The victims range in age from 64 to 14. Survivors of the shooting recall how those victims died, many of them trying to save others.

“This extraordinary woman pushed a student out of the way to protect them and took the deadly bullet that ended her life,” Lydia Swartz tweeted. “Please don’t forget her name. Do not ever forget what she did. Do not let her legacy die. Glenda Ann Perkins was a selfless, heroic savior. #RememberAnnPerkins.”

One of those heroes that also tried to save the life of another was just 15.

Christian Riley Garcia, age 15.

Abel San Miguel said in an interview with Univision that Christian tried to block the door so the shooter could not enter. But when Christian opened it, that’s when the shooter killed him.

“He had the biggest heart and the biggest chunk of ours feels to have left with him,” Sarah Saunders, his aunt, said to an NBC affiliate.

According to news reports, Christian had always sought to help others and wanted to enlist in the military when he turned 18.

Family and friends gathered for a vigil this weekend to remember him. A Gofundme account has been launched in his name.

Angelique Ramirez, age 15.

Angelique was a youth ministry at Dayspring Church, CNN reports.

Sylvia Pritchett, Angelique’s aunt wrote on Facebook: “I just don’t know how much strength we all have left. Everyone grieving in their own ways, getting by minute by minute. All I know is you will forever be our rainbow baby girl! Every rainbow will represent you, just the same way you lived life and affected everyone who was blessed to be a part of your souls journey. You touched each and everyone one of us in so many ways, ways you didn’t even know. Rest easy my angel, forever the rainbow in our lives, a reflection of what love truly is!!”

Family and friends are also seeking financial help via GoFundme.

Jared Black, age 17.

“Our hearts are so sad for them. I was there when they heard the news,” family friend Elizabeth McGinnis wrote on the GoFundMe page. “Such a rough day for all.  Bobby, Jared’s Dad, sat in misery for 13 hours not knowing if he was one of the victims. Then he got the devastating news after 6 p.m.”

Shana Fisher, age 16.

Fisher’s mother. Sadie Rodriguez, told the LA Times that her daughter had turned down the shooters multiple advances for a relationship and she believes that was a trigger for his attack.

“He kept making advances on her and she repeatedly told him no.,” Rodriguez told the LA Times. “A week later he opens fire on everyone he didn’t like. Shana being the first one.”

Aaron Kyle McLeod, age 15.

“He was never one to be a sad or down person. He always had to joke or laugh about things,” McLeod’s 15-year-old friend Kali Reeves told ABC 13. “He was just outgoing and super sweet. He definitely didn’t deserve this.”

Glenda Ann Perkins, age 64.

“We know Ann would want the students and faculty of Santa Fe High School, to whom she lovingly dedicated so much of her time, to remember to keep their hearts open, to discuss their feelings with family members, friends, and counselors in order to successfully conquer this tragedy,” her family members said in a statement, according to The New York Times.

Sabika Sheikh, age 17.

“What are you doing with your society,” her uncle Colonel Haider Ali told the media while urging the U.S. to make their schools safer. “We sent her to be educated, not to come back like this.”

Christopher Stone, age 17.

“He was so gentle, anyone that knew him were touched by him,” his older sister Angelica told CBS News. “And I just don’t think he deserved anything that happened to him, but we know he is still with us. And he will always be in our hearts.”

Cynthia Tisdale, age 63.

“There was never a question whether she enjoyed the job or not,” her husband told The New York Times. “She adored it.”

Kimberly Vaughan, age 16.

“I was sitting there at the table last night with friends and family and I said, ‘I can sit here and I can be sad about it, and I can cry, which doesn’t do any good. Or I can talk to people about how awesome (Kimberly) was and I can start calling my politicians, and you know, we can work on making some changes so it doesn’t have to happen again,'” Vaughan’s mom, Rhonda Hart, told KTUU.


READ: Texas’ Santa Fe High School Shooting Is The Third School Shooting In 8 Days

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below and use #Latinos4GunReform to let us know what change you want to see.

A Man In El Paso Has Been Charged With The Murder Of His Date After She Went Missing

Things That Matter

A Man In El Paso Has Been Charged With The Murder Of His Date After She Went Missing

El Paso Police Department

The family of a woman who had been declared missing since July has finally found tragic answers after El Paso police charged Ricardo Marquez, 28, with her murder. Erika Andrea Gaytan, 29, was reported missing by her family on July 16, who felt it was out-of-character for Gaytan to disappear and leave her 7-year-old son behind. Gaytan reportedly was last heard from after going to a concert at the El Paso County Coliseum on July 13 with Ricardo Marquez. Gaytan recorded the concert, featuring Los Rieleros del Norte, Polo Urias and La Maquinaria Norteña, from her social media last night, marking the last time anyone heard from her. Detectives say that the day after Gaytan’s disappearance, Marquez borrowed his brother’s car and his sister’s shovel. Gaytan’s blood was found in Marquez’s Jeep. In a statement released Wednesday, Sgt. Enrique Carrillo said that Gaytan’s “body has not been found, but based on forensic and other evidence gathered over the course of the investigation detectives have reason to believe that she is deceased and was the victim of a murder.”

Police believe Marquez used zip-ties to restrain Gaytan in his home, where he murdered her.

CREDIT: EL PASO POLICE DEPARTMENT / FACEBOOK

Marquez was brought in for questioning following Gaytan’s disappearance, where he told detectives that she came home with him, but used a ride-hailing app to leave after they got into a verbal argument. Detectives found no evidence that Gaytan used her ride-hailing apps, discrediting Marquez’s statement. According to a court affidavit, Marquez continued to give conflicting statements about his experience with Gaytan, and his whereabouts the following day, when speaking with law enforcement and family and friends alike. 

Marquez allegedly spent the next day covering up his crime.

CREDIT: @JALAKFOX_CBS / TWITTER

Investigators then looked into Marquez’s phone records, which showed that he had texted his brother and sister the next morning. He asked his brother if he could borrow his all-wheel-drive Jeep Wrangler, and picked up a shovel from his sister. Surveillance video evidence creates a timeline for Marquez’s alleged cover-up. He borrowed a shovel from his sister around 11:25 a.m. the following morning, and then went to his brother’s house to pick up the Jeep. He spent about an hour with his brother before being spotted on the 13900 block of Montana in east El Paso, driving toward the Redlands desert area. An hour later, the Jeep was spotted again, driving back to his brother’s house around 1:39 p.m., according to the affidavit that was issued for his arrest. With a search warrant in hand, a Department of Public Safety DNA lab-tested Marquez’s brother’s Jeep trunk floor mat, which came back positive for traces of Gaytan’s blood. Police believe Marquez transported Gaytan’s body in the trunk of his brother’s car, and buried her in an unknown area in the desert.

Court documents cite that a search of Marquez’s home produced the shovel he borrowed from his sister, a pair of shoes filled with sand, and zip-ties “tied in a manner to be used as restraints.” Detectives have concluded that “Ricardo Marquez murdered the victim in his residence, used the Jeep to transport the body of the victim to an unknown location only accessible by off-road vehicles, and that he used the shovel to bury the body.”

The El Paso community is shocked to hear of Gaytan’s murder.

CREDIT: EL PASO POLICE DEPARTMENT / FACEBOOK

“Too many tragedies as of late,” commented Melissa Arredondo on the El Paso Police Department’s Facebook announcement of the arrest. “Dang… And the report says he buried her near Redlands. That place is so cursed. My friend’s dad just died there. It will never be the same,” commented another member of the community. Others remain hopeful in demanding that the police find Gaytan’s body before assuming her death. “Too many questions remain,” commented another concerned El Paso citizen.

Gaytan was facing a court hearing for criminal mischief when she disappeared, but her family couldn’t believe that she would leave her son behind without warning. Gaytan once appeared on El Paso’s Most Wanted List in 2017 before she was charged 66 charges of credit abuse in a criminal mischief case.

Police say the investigation is ongoing and detectives are relying on the public for more information. If you have information on the case or Ricardo Marquez, call (915) 212-4040 or Crime Stoppers of El Paso at (915) 566-8477.

READ: California Man Arrested With Drugs And Guns While Keeping A Person Hostage And Suspected Of Murder

An Author Is Opening The Discussion On The Violent History In The U.S. Against Mexicans In Texas

Things That Matter

An Author Is Opening The Discussion On The Violent History In The U.S. Against Mexicans In Texas

@MonicaMnzMtz / Twitter

The history of Latinos in the U.S. dates back to before it was called the United States. Latinos have always inhabited many parts of what is now the United States of America. However, the recorded history of what happened to them while on this land is one that has often gone disputed and untold. However, in time, it is through oral history and fragments of documents and photographs that scholars have been able to complete the puzzle. Today’s experience of Latinos living in the current administration is just another addition to the story. 

Monica Muñoz Martinez, an assistant professor of American studies at Brown University, released a book last year titled “The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas,” and discussed the many ways the history of Latinos in the U.S. is complex and vital to remember. 

Credit: @nbcnews / Twitter

Martinez talked about her book in a recent interview on the public radio station WBUR. The program, which featured Muñoz Martinez, began by mentioning the increase in hate crimes against Latinos and how these crimes aren’t anything new, but something this community has been experiencing for a very long time. 

“One hundred years ago, anti-immigrant and anti-Mexican rhetoric fueled an era of racial violence by law enforcement and by vigilantes. But it’s also important to remember that this kind of sentiment, this rhetoric, also shapes policy,” Muñoz Martinez said on WBUR. “So 100 years ago, it shaped anti-immigrant policy like the 1924 Immigration Act. It also shaped policies like Jim Crow-style laws to segregate communities … and targeting Mexican Americans especially. There [were] efforts to keep American citizens, Mexican Americans, from voting. But there were also forced sterilization laws that were introduced, and U.S. Border Patrol was established in 1924. Our policing practices, our institutions today have deep roots in this period of racial violence.” 

Muñoz Martinez, who received a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University, also spoke about the Porvenir massacre — an attack against Mexican-Americans that isn’t widely known but was recently made into a film

Credit: @MonicaMnzMtz / Twitter

She called the attack of innocent people a “case of state-sanctioned violence that is really profound and reminding us [not only] of the kinds of injustices that people experienced, but also the injustices that continue to remain in communities and were carried by descendants who fought the injustice and have been working for generations to remember this history.”

Muñoz Martinez notes that it’s important to continue to talk openly about the atrocities against Latinos in the U.S. in order to understand the big picture of racism in the country, but also to realize how these experiences shape the community as well. 

Credit: @MonicaMnzMtz / Twitter

“Well, it’s difficult to teach these histories on their own. But it’s also deeply disturbing because students make connections.” Muñoz Martinez said on the radio show. “It prompts conversations about police violence today, police shootings on the border by Border Patrol agents. One of the cases that I write about in my book is the shooting of Concepcion García, who was a 9-year-old girl who was studying in Texas and became ill and crossed the Rio Grande into Mexico with her mother and her aunt to recover her. She was shot by a U.S. border agent.

“So when we teach these histories, it’s important to know that these kinds of injustices have lasting consequences, not only in shaping our institutions but shaping cultures and societies,” she added. “When we think about the impact of some of the cases from 100 years ago continuing to weigh heavy on people a century later, it’s a warning to us that we must heed. And we will have to work actively as a public. If we don’t call for public accountability, these patterns of violence are going to continue, and we will be working for a long time to remedy the kinds of violence that we’re seeing.”

For more information about Muñoz Martinez’s work, you don’t need to be a student at Brown University. All you need is a library card. 

Credit: @MonicaMnzMtz / Twitter

Her book “The Injustice Never Leaves You: Anti-Mexican Violence in Texas” is available everywhere. You can buy it as well. You can also click here to listen to her entire interview on WBUR or follow her work at Refusing to Forget on Twitter, and her personal social media account as well

READ: A New Documentary Exposes The Massacre In Porvenir, Texas That Left 15 Mexican-Americans Dead