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Retired Marine Staff Sgt. Jose Luis Sanchez, Who Lost Leg In Afghanistan, Crosses Boston Marathon Carrying U.S. Flag

jls143_ / Instagram

In 2013 the Boston Marathon was viciously attacked. When a home-made bomb went off at the finish line, three people lost their lives and 264 were injured, including 14 who needed amputations. Since then, the running of the annual marathon has become a symbol of perseverance for many, with some of the victims of the bombing returning to run again. Runners have come from all over to show their grit, determination and for many, their patriotism.


Staff Sgt. Jose Luis Sanchez a retired marine and amputee completed the Boston Marathon with a U.S. flag in hand.

A post shared by Laura Vitalini (@lkv117) on

This year’s breakout Boston Marathon story of perseverance and patriotism is undoubtedly that of retired marine, Staff Sgt. Jose Luis Sanchez, who lost part of his leg in 2011 after stepping on an IED while on duty in Afghanistan. Sanchez completed the 26 mile race in under 6 hours, while wearing a “Semper Fi” shirt and waving a giant U.S. flag the whole way. Whatever your politics, there’s no denying his strength and bravery, coming back to run after not being able to stand for more than three seconds at a time.


In a video from The Boston Herald, Sanchez commented on his journey from not being able to stand, to running 26 miles.

Credit: Boston Herald / Youtube

“I wanted to not only recognize veterans and stuff, but everyone that thinks that they’re unable to do something. I couldn’t stand up for more than three seconds or walk more than two feet, and I fought my way for four, five years, just to be able to walk farther, be able to lift my body up. And I kept on pushing it. Mentally and spiritually I was good, so I wanted to push it even further and do the marathon.”


There were tons of images of Sanchez running with his flag on social media.

According to an interview with Runner’s World, the flag he ran with was given to him by his patrol unit as he recovered. The flag has positive messages written on it in marker. Of the flag, Sanchez told Runner’s World “I boxed it up for three or four years because I didn’t want to acknowledge it.” He then went on to say: “One day I opened it back up and read through the inspirational quotes they sent me and I was motivated.”


The crowds were all about it, cheering him on loudly while he pushed forward.

He looked strong from start to finish.


But no image was as powerful as seeing him actually cross the finish line, with the crowd cheering and his flag waving.

A fellow runner offered to help, but Sanchez was strong on his own.


If you’re not crying yet, put on your seatbelt and grab some tissues. He ran with his wife, who recorded and cheered him on the whole way, hugging him at the end.

They crossed the finish line together and shared a big hug.


As beautiful as it all is, according to his Instagram account, it was a long and difficult road and inspiration was only the beginning.

♠I HAVE BEEN SCARED AND FUCKING TERRIFIED OF THIS BOSTON MARATHON. IM AFRAID OF FAILURE AND LOSS AND TO LET EVERYONE DOWN, BUT THROUGH THE LOVE AND SUPPORT. I’M REMINDED THAT IT’S NOT ABOUT BEING THE BIGGEST , STRONGEST OR FASTEST PERSON. ITS ABOUT NEVER FUCKING GIVING UP. NEVER FUCKING QUITING. NEVER FUCKING SURRENDERING. IT’S ABOUT FIGHTING BACK WHEN LIFE PUSHES YOU AROUND. YOU FUCKING PUSH BACK AND PUSH BACK FUCKING HARD. IT’S ABOUT BEING FUCKING RESILIENT, KEEPING THE MOTHER FUCKING DRIVE ALIVE AND PUSHING THE LIMITS OF FUCKING POSSIBLE. THAT’S WHAT THE FUCK IT’S ALL ABOUT!!!!! ________________________________________________ #FUCKIT #FUCKSHITUP #SEMPERFI #DRIVE #DESIRE #MOTIVATE #INSPIRE #NEVERGIVEUP #NEVERSURRENDER #BERESILIENT #FITSPIRATION #FITFAM #AFFLICTIONSPORT #AFFLICTION #FIGHTHARD #LIVEFREE #LIVEFAST #LOVEHARD

A post shared by Jose Luis Sanchez (@jls143_) on

According to him, it all started with fear, but an immense sense of hard work and determination has brought him all the way to where he is today.


Sanchez went on to work amazingly hard and used his Instagram account to inspire others with his journey, amassing over 30k followers along the way.

A post shared by Jose Luis Sanchez (@jls143_) on

 The man is a beast.


After the marathon, Sanchez took to Instagram, to drive the inspirational point home.

“Just wanted to let you know this is not about me. It’s about what this represent(s). It’s for you all to see how we all impact each other for a greater good.”


Hang on while I go find a gym to sign up for and hug my mom. No, you’re crying.


[H/T] Marine who lost leg in Afghanistan runs Boston Marathon with American flag

READ: This Former Marine Had To Self-Deport To Mexico Before He Could Become A U.S. Citizen


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[Video] This Incredible Ted Talk Touches On The Everyday Stereotypical Roles Latinos Are Required To Take In Hollywood

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[Video] This Incredible Ted Talk Touches On The Everyday Stereotypical Roles Latinos Are Required To Take In Hollywood

Instagram/@bcompanygram

Ted Talks have grown in demand due to their refreshing, informative, and exciting topics and speakers. Whether we’re learning about scientific, cultural, political, and academic matters, it is the speaker that brings these topics to life. We especially like when we hear from extraordinary Latinas including Pia Mancini, an activist and technical project leader from Argentina, Isabel Allende and a Chilean writer who spoke about passion. Last week’s speaker touched on a topic that many Latinas could relate to.

America Ferrera gave a Ted Talk and discussed how representation in the media ultimately brings an “extraordinary richness of humanity.”

Instagram/@americaferrera

On April 19, Ferrera was among several speakers at the Session 12 of TED2019 held in Vancouver, Canada. The actress, activist, and director addressed the audience and spoke about who her identity as a Latina of Honduran descent seemed at first to be her obstacle, but she slowly realized it meant more than that.

“My identity is not an obstacle — it’s my superpower,” she said.

The “Superstore” actress said she had to break through the mold of portraying stereotypical roles.

Instagram/@americaferrera

Ferrera said she didn’t want to play the “Gangbanger’s Girlfriend” or “Pregnant Chola #2” but instead more complicated roles.

“I wanted to play people who existed in the center of their own lives, not cardboard cutouts that stood in the background of someone else’s,” she says, “Who we see thriving in the world teaches us how to see ourselves, how to think about our own value, how to dream about our futures.”

She added, “In spite of what I’d been told my whole life. I saw firsthand that my ‘unrealistic expectations’ to see myself authentically represented in the culture were other people’s expectations too.”

Ferrera said that Hollywood is more inclusive of minorities, but it’s not enough.

Instagram/@americaferrera

Even though her breakthrough role in “Real Women Have Curves” has launched more diverse characters in Hollywood, she says there’s still so much work that needs to be done.

“Change will come when each of us has the courage to question our own fundamental values and beliefs,” Ferrera said, “and see to it that our actions lead to our best intentions.”

We love the picture of Ferrera’s baby watching her speak during the Ted Talk. She captioned the photo by saying, “My baby boy watching me deliver my talk yesterday at #ted2019 – Thank you @ted for inviting me to share my truth and a message I believe in with my whole heart. #TheFutureIsWatching.”

READ: These Iconic Ugly Betty Moments Defined A Show That Defined Our Youth

This Latina Olympic Athlete Won The Boston Marathon Ending The 33-Year Long American Drought

Things That Matter

This Latina Olympic Athlete Won The Boston Marathon Ending The 33-Year Long American Drought

des_linden / Instagram

Desiree Linden won this year’s Boston Marathon, making her the first American female to win the storied race since 1985. The 34-year-old runner finished the 26.2-mile race with a time of 2:39:54. The weather conditions were frigid and it rained throughout the race. She told reporters afterwards that she almost didn’t make it to the end.

“Early on in the race I was feeling horrible,” Desiree said in a news conference. Desiree also said that she told fellow runner Shalane Flanagan that she might “drop out.” “If you need something, block the wind, whatever, let me know,” Linden recalls her words to Flanagan.

Right after the race, Linden said she was thrilled about winning, but was very exhausted. “I left it all out there,” Desiree said.

Desiree has been competing in the Boston Marathon on and off since 2007.

According to Yahoo Sports, Desiree has been always been a top ten finalist at the Boston Marathon, but never cleared it to the top until now. In 2011, she missed the top prize by two seconds.

This is the first time an American has won the women’s competition of the Boston Marathon since 1985.

This year, in the men’s category Yuki Kawauchi from Japan. Before that American Meb Keflezighi won in 2014, but prior to that, an American male hadn’t won the race since 1983.

In the women’s category, women from Kenya and Ethiopia have been dominating the iconic race.

Desiree has been a long distance runner since her high school days in Chula Vista.

In 2012, she was part of a small group of Latinos to compete in the London Olympics. And in 2016, she was only one of two Latinas at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics track and field team.

Desiree says her husband, also a marathon runner, Ryan Linden is one of her biggest supporters.

Desiree — who’s surname was formally Davila — said she wasn’t sure if her husband would be there or watching the race on TV somewhere. But he did not let her down and was there at the finish line to celebrate her victory.

READ: Retired Marine Staff Sgt. Jose Luis Sanchez, Who Lost Leg In Afghanistan, Crosses Boston Marathon Carrying U.S. Flag

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