Things That Matter

Caboodles Launched A Collection With Barbie And Some Millennials Are Ready To Organize Their Scrunchies And Smackers

If you were a teen in the 90s you had to have a Caboodles organizer—the bright plastic cases filled with trays for organizing makeup. (And If you had one, you probably grew up to be the kind of person who hangs out in The Container Store for fun). Growing up, I played with Barbie dolls and just as I lost interest, I moved on makeup, which led me to discover Caboodles. Somehow though, I never got to play with both 90s classics at the same time. 

Now that 90s nostalgia is at an all-time high, Mattel and Caboodles are fixing that, by launching a collaboration between the two 90s icons, after all this time. 

Caboodles announced the collab with Barbie via an Instagram giveaway gifting the original collab Barbie doll and her caboodles from the 90s.

credit Instagram @realcaboodles

Caboodles recently launched an adorable collaboration with Mattel which features several case designs with barbie inspired accents and colors. The classic On-The-Go and ‘Pretty in Petite’ cases from the nineties are making a comeback in ‘Iconic Pink’ (a true nostalgic Barbie Dream House hot pink) and Pure Glam (a more subtle rose gold). In addition to the legendary Barbie color palette collection, there will be a truly epic clear case. The clear Barbie X Caboodles makeup organizer is a neat freak’s dream. The collection will expand to Ulta this month and there’s more in the pipeline well into 2020.

This is not the first time the beauty organizer brand partners with Barbie. In the early 90s, Caboodles partnered with Mattel to release a Caboodles Barbie. The doll retailed for $12.99 and came with “a real makeup case and glitter beach makeup,” according to the 1993 ad. You might still be able to get one on Etsy or eBay. For the launch of their new collection, Caboodles gave away a vintage case from that very first collaboration to one lucky winner on Instagram.

The collaboration appeals to women now as much as it did when they were kids.

credit Instagram @realcaboodles

“Barbie inspires the limitless potential in every girl, and we are committed to championing girls of all ages and giving them the tools to succeed,” said Mattel’s vice president of global strategy and U.S. consumer products, Diane Reichenberger, who said the brand is thrilled to bring back a collaboration that will appeal to women now as much as it did when they were kids. 

In the same joint statement, Khadeja Salley, director of lifestyle brands at Caboodles’ parent company, Plano Synergy, said, “At the core of the Caboodles brand is the idea that organization can and should be limitless, driving potential for women and girls to express their individuality all while tackling any challenges life throws at them,” adding, “Sharing common core beliefs and a passion for encouraging others to follow their dreams, we are excited to present this quintessential collection to both nostalgic and new consumers.”

Caboodles were inspired by tackle boxes, but for organizing makeup and beauty products.

Credit Instagram @realcaboodles

Although company legend has it that Caboodles were inspired by a 1986 People magazine photoshoot where Vanna White used a fishing tackle box as a makeup organizer, Caboodles were actually the brainchild of New Zealand native Leonie Mateer. When she relocated to California in the 1980s, Mateer wanted to start a business; she recalled that she had once seen a model arriving to a photoshoot with a tackle box to organize her cosmetics, and the idea was born.

Leonie Mateer came up with the name ‘Caboodles’ in the bathtub and launched in the late 80s.

credit Instagram @realcaboodles

“I knew that the name needed to be colorful if it was to appeal to my target audience—teens,” Mateer wrote in her book, The Caboodle Blueprint: Turn Your Idea Into Millions. “I was sitting in my bathtub reading a huge Oxford English Dictionary,” she recalled. “I came across ‘Caboodles,’ which had a definition of ‘a collection or clutter of things.’ How perfect, I thought, for an organizer box.” The first boxes, called ‘on-the-go organizers’ hit the market in 1987 and were an instant hit. In the first two years, the company sold 2 million years. By 1992, The New York Times reported that “nearly 80 percent of teenage girls in the country are aware of Caboodles.” Eventually, the line grew to 70 products, which retailed between $5 and $40.

You can now relive your very organized teen years by picking up a brand new Caboodle. The Caboodles x Barbie collection is now available for purchase at Caboodles website and will launch an additional exclusive line at Ulta nationwide this coming October. 

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Barbie Discusses White Privilege, Racial Profiling, and Microaggressions On Her YouTube Channel

Fierce

Barbie Discusses White Privilege, Racial Profiling, and Microaggressions On Her YouTube Channel

Barbie may have the reputation of being just a kid’s doll without much substance behind her shiny plastic face, but the truth is, the brand is seeking to do much more than that.

Last Wednesday, Barbie posted a video to her YouTube channel where she tackled the difficult topic of racism.

For those of you who don’t know, Barbie has a popular YouTube channel where she appears as an animated character in vlog-style videos. On her channel, along with videos like “DIY Rainbow Summer Party Ideas” and ” My Puppy Did My Homework?”, Barbie also tackles more serious topics from mental health to bullying.

In her most recent video, titled “Barbie and Nikki Discuss Racism,” Barbie invited her friend Nikki (who is Black) to discuss specific experiences in Nikki’s life where she felt she was treated unfairly due to the color of her skin.

Nikki then took center stage, telling stories of the microaggressions and unfair treatment that she has experienced as a Black woman. The language and concepts were in plain language that was easy for young viewers to understand.

Nikki starts by telling a story about how she was racially profiled. “Barbie and I had a sticker-selling contest on the beach last month. We split up and went our separate directions to see who could sell the most. While I was on the boardwalk, beach security stopped me three times. The security officer thought I was doing something bad, even though I was doing exactly the same thing that you were doing.”

Nikki goes on to tell another story about how her new French teacher discounted her amazing exam results by telling her she just “got lucky”. Nikki decided not to join the French Club because she didn’t want to have to keep proving herself.

At one point, Nikki says: “People did these things because I was Black, and they made the wrong assumptions about me.”

Through the video, Barbie is an ideal ally, offering Nikki kindness, support and empathy. She never tries to make her feelings seem invalid. She even tells the viewers about white privilege: “That means that white people get an advantage that they didn’t earn, and Black people get a disadvantage that they don’t deserve.”

According to Mattel Executive Lisa McKnight, these types of videos are part of their quest to “leverage” their “global platform” to tackle important topics.

“Being an ally includes having difficult conversations to better understand discrimination,” McKnight said to Insider. “We hope that by leveraging Barbie and Nikki to explore these conversations in a kid-friendly format, we can spark productive discussions for families and empower our next generation of leaders to become advocates for change, raising their voices against racism.”

We can’t wait to see what else Barbie teaches children through her YouTube channel.

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Barbie Is Doing Día De Muertos Once Again In 2020 And Twitter Has Something To Say About It

Culture

Barbie Is Doing Día De Muertos Once Again In 2020 And Twitter Has Something To Say About It

Barbie / Mattel, Inc

Mexico’s famed Día de Muertos celebrations are coming up, the time of year when families honor their dead relatives with ofrendas, parades, visits to cemeteries, and many other festivities.

And, of course, Barbie wasn’t going to miss out on the celebrations.

Mattel – which makes Barbie – has just launched a new Barbie Catrina that is much more festive and colorful than the first one last year, who was dressed in black.

On this occasion, Mattel worked with Mexican-American designer Javier Meabe who wanted to reflect the joy and deep-rooted traditions of the country.

“As a Mexican-American designer, it was important for me to use my creative voice to design a doll that celebrates the bright colors and vivid textures of my culture, as well as the traditions I grew up with that are represented and celebrated in Barbie,” Meaba said in a statement from Mattel. 

Although, Mattel has enlisted the designs of a Mexican-American designer, not everyone is pleased with the launch. Some are worried that the entire Día de Muertos collection is potentially watering down a 3,000-year-old tradition and are accusing Barbie of cultural appropriation.

Barbie is releasing its second Día de Muertos doll and it’s generating plenty of buzz.

For the second year in a row, Mattel is launching a Día de Muertos Barbie modeled after the traditions of Mexico’s famed celebrations.

“We often look at different ways to continue to engage girls and families to gain knowledge and celebrate other cultures and other parts of the world,” Michelle Chidoni, a spokeswoman for the company, said. “Our hope is for this Día de Muertos Barbie to honor the holiday for the millions that celebrate and to introduce people not familiar with the tradition to the rich meaning.”

This year’s doll was designed by Mexican American designer Javier Meabe who was inspired by his personal background and family traditions.

“It was very important that the second Dia De Muertos doll felt just as special as the first in the Barbie series,” said Meabe in a statement. “As a Mexican American Designer, it was important to me to use my creative voice to design a doll that celebrates the bright colors and vivid textures of my culture, as well, as have the traditions I grew up with represented and celebrated in Barbie.”

He continued, “For this doll, I was inspired by the color gold seen throughout Mexican culture, jewelry, buildings, statues and artwork and highlighted it throughout the design. The roses represent emotions and moments in life including celebrations, birth, death, passion, and love and I also was inspired to introduce new textures and a new dress silhouette.”

Barbie lovers can buy the doll for $75 on the company’s website or at mass retailers such as Amazon, Target and Walmart.

Last year marked the first time Barbie celebrated the iconic Mexican holiday.

Credit: Barbie / Mattel, Inc

Last year, Mattel released the first Barbie doll celebrating the Mexican holiday Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead), and it was a huge hit. The floral dress and headpiece on the doll combined with the traditional calavara makeup design was absolutely stunning, and the same can be said about the 2020 version that just launched.

This time around, the Barbie Dia de Muertos doll features a light, blush-colored lace dress over a layer embroidered with floral and skeleton accents. The intricacy of the makeup has been taken up a notch, and the “golden highlights in her hair shimmer beneath a crown of skeleton hands holding roses and marigolds.”

However, since last year many have been questioning the intentions of Barbie and whether or not this is a good move.

In Mexican culture, the Día de Muertos — or Day of the Dead — is when the gateway between the living and the dead is said to open, a holiday during which the living honor and pay respects to loved ones who have died.

The new Día de Muertos Barbie was intended less as a portal into the realm of the dead and more as a gateway into Mexican culture. At least that is what Mattel is hoping for.

However, not everyone agrees. Latinx Twitter has lit up with both excitement and anger, with some folks appreciating the design while others are calling Mattel out for cultural appropriation. The Día de Muertos doll is another way Latinx culture is slowly entering the mainstream. With acclaimed shows like Vida and One Day at a Time and movies like Coco and Roma winning accolades — it seems even a toy company is looking to capitalize on Latinx culture

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