Things That Matter

Caboodles Launched A Collection With Barbie And Some Millennials Are Ready To Organize Their Scrunchies And Smackers

If you were a teen in the 90s you had to have a Caboodles organizer—the bright plastic cases filled with trays for organizing makeup. (And If you had one, you probably grew up to be the kind of person who hangs out in The Container Store for fun). Growing up, I played with Barbie dolls and just as I lost interest, I moved on makeup, which led me to discover Caboodles. Somehow though, I never got to play with both 90s classics at the same time. 

Now that 90s nostalgia is at an all-time high, Mattel and Caboodles are fixing that, by launching a collaboration between the two 90s icons, after all this time. 

Caboodles announced the collab with Barbie via an Instagram giveaway gifting the original collab Barbie doll and her caboodles from the 90s.

credit Instagram @realcaboodles

Caboodles recently launched an adorable collaboration with Mattel which features several case designs with barbie inspired accents and colors. The classic On-The-Go and ‘Pretty in Petite’ cases from the nineties are making a comeback in ‘Iconic Pink’ (a true nostalgic Barbie Dream House hot pink) and Pure Glam (a more subtle rose gold). In addition to the legendary Barbie color palette collection, there will be a truly epic clear case. The clear Barbie X Caboodles makeup organizer is a neat freak’s dream. The collection will expand to Ulta this month and there’s more in the pipeline well into 2020.

This is not the first time the beauty organizer brand partners with Barbie. In the early 90s, Caboodles partnered with Mattel to release a Caboodles Barbie. The doll retailed for $12.99 and came with “a real makeup case and glitter beach makeup,” according to the 1993 ad. You might still be able to get one on Etsy or eBay. For the launch of their new collection, Caboodles gave away a vintage case from that very first collaboration to one lucky winner on Instagram.

The collaboration appeals to women now as much as it did when they were kids.

credit Instagram @realcaboodles

“Barbie inspires the limitless potential in every girl, and we are committed to championing girls of all ages and giving them the tools to succeed,” said Mattel’s vice president of global strategy and U.S. consumer products, Diane Reichenberger, who said the brand is thrilled to bring back a collaboration that will appeal to women now as much as it did when they were kids. 

In the same joint statement, Khadeja Salley, director of lifestyle brands at Caboodles’ parent company, Plano Synergy, said, “At the core of the Caboodles brand is the idea that organization can and should be limitless, driving potential for women and girls to express their individuality all while tackling any challenges life throws at them,” adding, “Sharing common core beliefs and a passion for encouraging others to follow their dreams, we are excited to present this quintessential collection to both nostalgic and new consumers.”

Caboodles were inspired by tackle boxes, but for organizing makeup and beauty products.

Credit Instagram @realcaboodles

Although company legend has it that Caboodles were inspired by a 1986 People magazine photoshoot where Vanna White used a fishing tackle box as a makeup organizer, Caboodles were actually the brainchild of New Zealand native Leonie Mateer. When she relocated to California in the 1980s, Mateer wanted to start a business; she recalled that she had once seen a model arriving to a photoshoot with a tackle box to organize her cosmetics, and the idea was born.

Leonie Mateer came up with the name ‘Caboodles’ in the bathtub and launched in the late 80s.

credit Instagram @realcaboodles

“I knew that the name needed to be colorful if it was to appeal to my target audience—teens,” Mateer wrote in her book, The Caboodle Blueprint: Turn Your Idea Into Millions. “I was sitting in my bathtub reading a huge Oxford English Dictionary,” she recalled. “I came across ‘Caboodles,’ which had a definition of ‘a collection or clutter of things.’ How perfect, I thought, for an organizer box.” The first boxes, called ‘on-the-go organizers’ hit the market in 1987 and were an instant hit. In the first two years, the company sold 2 million years. By 1992, The New York Times reported that “nearly 80 percent of teenage girls in the country are aware of Caboodles.” Eventually, the line grew to 70 products, which retailed between $5 and $40.

You can now relive your very organized teen years by picking up a brand new Caboodle. The Caboodles x Barbie collection is now available for purchase at Caboodles website and will launch an additional exclusive line at Ulta nationwide this coming October. 

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The Bryant Family Has Filed Trademarks For ‘Mamba, Mambacita’ Amidst Apparel Line Reports

Fierce

The Bryant Family Has Filed Trademarks For ‘Mamba, Mambacita’ Amidst Apparel Line Reports

Since the tragic deaths of her husband Kobe Bryant and daughter Gianna Bryant, Vanessa Bryant has made her mission to secure and preserve their legacy an obvious one. From pursuing justice for theirs and the other victims of the helicopter crash that took their lives, to ensuring the creation of memorials in their name, Bryant has made a point of making sure none of the victims of the fateful crash are forgotten.

More recently, Vanessa Bryant has set out to protect the ‘Mamba’ brand.

According to a recent report, an attorney for Bryant filed a trademark application for ‘Mamba’ and ‘Mambacita’ in early March.

While there’s little known about what Bryant intends to do with the brand names, the report suggests that the current agenda is to use the trademark for merchandise such as shirts, hoodies, jackets, and pants.

Kobe’s estate has filed for several trademarks related to his brand including ‘Mamba Sports Academy,’ ‘Mambacita,’ ‘Lady Mambas,’ and ‘Lil Mambas.’ 

The association with Bryant and the “Mamba” concept goes back to his days on the court where he was affectionately known as the Black Mamba. Bryant gave himself the nickname after a period of struggle. In a 2015 documentary called Muse, Kobe explained that he created the alter ego of Black Mamba to cope with off-the-court struggles in 2003.

“I went from a person who was at the top of his game, had everything coming, to a year later, having absolutely no idea where life is going or if you are even going to be a part of life as we all know it,” Bryant explained in the documentary. “I had to separate myself… It felt like there were so many things coming at once. It was just becoming very, very confusing. I had to organize things. So I created The Black Mamba.”

The Mamba name carried into his retirement when he left the NBA after twenty years. At the time, Bryant set out to coach and mentor younger children interested in sports at the Mamba Sports Academy, a training facility that he opened in California. Bryant’s daughter Gianna, 13, was a member of the Mambas girl’s team.

When the Bryants’ daughter Gianna began to come into her own on the basketball court, she took on the nickname “Mambacita.” 

On a recent cover feature for People Magazine, Vanessa Bryant explained that she’s found motivation in her devastating loss.

During an interview for the magazine’s ‘Women Changing the World’ issue, Bryant revaled “This pain is unimaginable [but] you just have to get up and push forward. Lying in bed crying isn’t going to change the fact that my family will never be the same again. But getting out of bed and pushing forward is going to make the day better for my girls and for me. So that’s what I do.”

Bryant also recently reportedly took over Granity Studios, her husband’s multimedia company, and also relaunched Mamba & Mambacita Sports Foundation which is focused on “creating positive impact for underserved athletes and young women in sports” and “provides funding and sports programming for underserved athletes to enable participation in school and/or league sports that enrich socio-emotional and physical development.”

Speaking to People about her efforts, Bryant explained, “I guess the best way to describe it is that Kobe and Gigi motivate me to keep going. They inspire me to try harder and be better every day. Their love is unconditional and they motivate me in so many different ways.”

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Lawsuit Over Subway Tuna Sandwich Claims That It’s Mystery Meat

Culture

Lawsuit Over Subway Tuna Sandwich Claims That It’s Mystery Meat

Oh, mystery meat. We live in America which means we’re all bound to come across it at some point. From the school cafeteria to even our favorite taco joints, we’ve all been faced with the alarming realization that at some point we’ve definitely eaten it.

Fans of Subway are coming to the realization about the circumstances of Subway meals, once again, thanks to a recent lawsuit challenging the substance of its tuna.

A new Subway lawsuit alleges that the sandwich chain’s tuna is made from a “mixture of various concoctions” made to “imitate the appearance of tuna.”

Brought forth by Karen Dhanowa and Nilima Amin, two women from California on Jan. 21 the lawsuit claims that “independent testing has repeatedly affirmed, the products are made from anything but tuna.” The lawsuit did not share any evidence of the claims.

Amin and Dhanowa’s lawyer, Alex Brown, asked in a statement last Friday, “What is Subway selling? We don’t know yet, but we are certain it is not tuna… We’re confident that our clients will prevail when they get their day in court.”

In response to the claims, Subway has launched a marketing barrage challenging the allegations that its tuna is fake.

“Keep fishing folks, we’ll keep serving 100% wild-caught tuna,” Subway posted in a Tweet.

The company is offering 15 percent off of its footlong tuna subs with the promotional code “ITSREAL” proving that they’re not waiting for a court to settle the accusations made about its tuna salad. According to CBS “The fast-food chain is already appealing to the court of public opinion with an advertising blitz touting its tuna salad sandwiches and wraps as made with ‘100% real wild caught tuna.'”  

They have further decided to stand by the quality of their tuna, sharing in a statement last Thursday that “There simply is no truth to the allegations in the complaint” and their tuna is mixed with mayo.

“Subway will vigorously defend itself against these and any other baseless efforts to mischaracterize and tarnish the high-quality products that Subway and its franchisees provide to their customers, in California, and around the world, and intends to fight these claims through all available avenues if they are not immediately dismissed,” the fast-food chain stated.

Maggie Truax, Subway’s director of Global PR told CBS MoneyWatch. “Subway delivers 100% cooked tuna to its restaurants, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches, wraps, and salads that are served to and enjoyed by our guests,” she stated. “Unfortunately, this lawsuit is part of a trend in which the named plaintiffs’ attorneys have been targeting the food industry in an effort to make a name for themselves in that space.”

According to Subway’s website, the company’s tuna salad is made with flaked tuna in brine, mayonnaise, and a flavor-protecting additive.

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