Things That Matter

Tropical Storm Dorian Could Hit Puerto Rico And People On The Island Aren’t Taking Any Chances

The Atlantic Hurricane season has been off to a slow start in 2019 and residents of Puerto Rico couldn’t be more thankful. After a devastating season in 2017, which included Hurricane Maria, the island is still in crisis mode trying to rebuild.

Many island residents are still without 24/7 access to electricity while many others are still living in makeshift homes or buildings without proper roofing.

So news that a powerful tropical storm, which could strengthen into a hurricane, has many boricuas on edge.

Another menacing storm is on track to slam the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, an island still grappling with the devastation of Hurricane Maria.

Tropical Storm Dorian is strengthening as it moves westward towards the Caribbean, and could reach hurricane strength by early Thursday, possibly before hitting Puerto Rico.

As of Monday morning, Dorian is considered a “small tropical cyclone.” It’s just over 130 miles from Barbados, with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph. It’s moving at approximately 14 mph towards the Windward Islands, which are expected to face tropical storm conditions later Monday. 

Tropical storm watches and warnings are in effect for the area, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

The storm system has intensified as it churns towards several Caribbean islands.

“Hurricane watches and tropical storm watches and warnings have been issued for parts of the Leeward and Windward Islands, where Dorian is expected move through on Tuesday morning,” meteorologist Dave Hennen said.

“The storm is still forecast to be a hurricane as it approaches Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic on Wednesday and Thursday.”

By the end of the week, what’s left of Dorian is expected to move toward the Bahamas and possibly southeastern parts of the mainland US. 

“But it is still way too early to forecast impacts,” Hennen said.

The storm is forecast to hit the Lesser Antilles as a strong tropical storm.

Tropical storm warnings have also been issued for Barbados, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Tropical storm watches have been issued for Dominica, Martinique and Grenada and its dependencies. A hurricane watch has been issued for St. Lucia.

The NHC also issued a warning for mariners, swimmers and surfers, saying that swells triggered by the storm around the Lesser Antilles could cause “life-threatening surf and rip current conditions” by late Monday.

It’s too early to tell for certain whether Dorian will hit Puerto Rico or other islands further west, and how strong of a storm it might be when and if it does. But the NHC says it’s monitoring the storm closely and “watches could be required later today.”

It was just under two years ago that Puerto Rico was devastated by Hurricane Maria,which led to the deaths of close to 3,000 people.

The island remains in crisis almost two years after Hurricane Maria, the deadliest natural disaster in U.S. history, killed almost 3,000 people in September 2017.

Puerto Rico’s power grid, which was destroyed, remains severely compromised, and with its electric utility more than $9 billion in debt, the island’s new governor earlier this month suspended a $450,000 contractthat was to have been part of the rebuilding program.

Dorian’s arrival also comes as Puerto Rico is suffering from what is perhaps the worst political crisis in its history. 

Governor Ricardo Rosselló resigned late last month amid historic demonstrations after hundreds of offensive chats between him and his top advisers were published, some of which made light of the deaths from Maria. 

And since then, the island has seen two more governors. Many are asking with all this distraction will the island be prepare for a potentially life-threatening storm. 

Puerto Ricans aren’t taking any chance with many already stocking up on supplies.

After the devastation that rocked the island after Hurricane Maria, many residents suffer from PTSD. Many are taking zero chances with this storm and have stormed local supermarkets to stock up on water, foods, batteries, and other important supplies. 

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Rising Star Chesca Talks Career Beginnings, Being a Latina in the Music Industry, Performing at Jimmy Kimmel and More

Latidomusic

Rising Star Chesca Talks Career Beginnings, Being a Latina in the Music Industry, Performing at Jimmy Kimmel and More

Welcome to Spotlight, where we do a deep dive into the careers of artists, producers, songwriters, and more people making an impact in the Latin music industry.

Puerto Rican singer Chesca is the definition of a hustler. She started as the vocalist for her dad’s cover band in Puerto Rico and became her own manager booking shows in places like China and Greece. The world is hers for the taking and she is going for it.

Chesca is ready for global stardom and she’s taking it one step at a time.

During our interview here at Latido Music by mitú, Chesca opened up about how a tragic accident at 11 years old changed her life, how music literally saved her, and the sacrifices she’s had to make to be where she is today.

Watch the full interview below:

Chesca is aware that being a Latina in the music industry isn’t easy but feels compelled to share her story and everything she’s had to do to get here. She would pretend to be her own manager and publicist at the beginning of her career. Chesca would book herself shows around the world where she would get to perform her own original songs. One of her songs actually got picked up by the radio in China, which is a market not many Latin stars even imagine entering, especially not when they’re just starting their careers.

“With everything that I’ve been through, I have a voice, and I have a story to tell that can motivate so many young women, that’s what keeps me going,” Chesca says.

While she had some success performing in English, she felt that she needed to go back to her roots and start doing music in Spanish. The stars aligned, and Chesca was signed by Saban Music Group, and currently has some high-profile collaborations under her belt. She’s behind the viral hit like “Te Quiero Baby (I Love You Baby),” which blew up on TikTok and led her to perform at the Latin Billboards last year with Pitbull.

Chesca most recently performed at the 2021 Latin AMAs red carpet and received a nomination for Best New Latin Artist at the 2021 iHeart Radio Music Awards.

After our conversation with Chesca, it’s clear that she’s making the right moves at the right time to make a name for herself in the industry, and we can’t wait to see what’s next for her career.

READ: Ivy Queen, Goyo, and Chesca to Headline Urban Divas United Concert in April

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Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Things That Matter

Today, Puerto Rico Celebrates Emancipation Day–the Day When the Island Officially Abolished Slavery

Photo via George W. Davis, Public Domain

Today, March 22nd marks Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud in Puerto Rico–the date that marks the emancipation of slaves in Puerto Rico. In Puerto Rico, enslaved peoples were emancipated in 1873–a full decade after the U.S. officially abolished slavery. But unlike the U.S. mainland, Puerto Rico celebrates today as an official holiday, where many businesses are closed.

The emancipation of Puerto Rican slaves was a very different process than the United States’. For one, the emancipation was gradual and over three years.

When the Spanish government abolished slavery in Puerto Rico 1873, enslaved men and women had to buy their freedom. The price was set by their “owners”. The way the emancipated slaves bought their freedom was through a process that was very similar to sharecropping in the post-war American south. Emancipated slaves farmed, sold goods, and worked in different trades to “buy” their freedom.

In the same Spanish edict that abolished slavery, slaves over the age of 60 were automatically freed. Enslaved children who were 5-years-old and under were also automatically freed.

Today, Black and mixed-race Puerto Ricans of Black descent make up a large part of Puerto Rico’s population.

The legacy of enslaved Black Puerto Ricans is a strong one. Unlike the United States, Puerto Rico doesn’t classify race in such black-and-white terms. Puerto Ricans are taught that everyone is a mixture of three groups of people: white Spanish colonizers, Black African slaves, and the indigenous Taíno population.

African influences on Puerto Rican culture is ubiquitous and is present in Puerto Rican music, cuisine, and even in the way that the island’s language evolved. And although experts estimate that up to 60% of Puerto Ricans have significant African ancestry, almost 76% of Puerto Ricans identified as white only in the latest census poll–a phenomenon that many sociologists have blamed on anti-blackness.

On Puerto Rico’s Día de la Abolición de Esclavitud, many people can’t help but notice that the island celebrates a day of freedom and independence when they are not really free themselves.

As the fight for Puerto Rican decolonization rages on, there is a bit of irony in the fact that Puerto Rico is one of the only American territories that officially celebrates the emancipation of slaves, when Puerto Rico is not emancipated from the United States. Yes, many Black Americans recognize Juneteenth (June 19th) as the official day to celebrate emancipation from slavery, but it is not an official government holiday.

Perhaps, Puerto Rico celebrates this historical day of freedom because they understand how important the freedom and independence is on a different level than mainland Americans do.

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