Things That Matter

People On Social Media Are Calling Out A Bar In Puerto Rico That Kicked Out A Party For Two Men Dancing

Two men vacationing in Puerto Rico were shocked when a restaurant worker told them they were only allowed to dance with women. The weekend before the New Year, a gay couple and their friends went to Gyros Sample Bar in Orocovis. Heterosexual couples started dancing, so two men in the group naturally decided to join. One of the victims, Trey May, shared a video of the encounter to Twitter to announce, “HOMOPHOBIA IS REAL AND ITS GLOBAL.” Luis Santiago-Rivera, May’s boyfriend, said that the worker explicitly told them, “Heterosexuals can dance, not a man with another man,” according to CBS reporter David Begnaud. The video has since gone viral, but the establishment’s apology isn’t satisfactory to most. 

Gyros Sample Bar’s story has changed multiple times, first going on the defense, saying the establishment was being “defamed,” then to say it was a misunderstanding, and finally to offer a “profuse” apology.

As you can see, another heterosexual couple was dancing at the same time that the two were asked to leave for dancing.

“Okay, so, this place is very homophobic,” May said while speaking outside the bar he was just removed from. “Just got kicked out for dancing with someone who wasn’t even my boyfriend. So if you’re ever in this area in Puerto Rico, do not go. These people are very homophobic,” he added. Until that night, May had a positive experience of Puerto Rico, captioning the video to say, “Okay… hate to interrupt the beauty I’ve been posting about Puerto Rico but this is something I feel NEEDS to be exposed. HOMOPHOBIA IS REAL AND ITS GLOBAL my boyfriend’s FAMILY AND I got kicked out of this bar because Kelvin (boyfriend’s friend) and I were DANCING together”

Since then, his tweet has been viewed nearly 300k times and retweeted and liked nearly 10k times. He’s since included a follow-up video that his friend took to capture the lovely moment of May and Kelvin dancing, which was interrupted when an employee approached them to tell them to stop.

May alleges that the worker used homophobic slurs and told the women who tried to get involved to “shut up.”

CREDIT: @TREYMAY_ / TWITTER

“NOT ONLY did they disrespect us, but they also disrespected the WOMEN pictured by telling them to shut up after the incident and basically telling them to stay out of it,” May tweeted. I would be shocked if homophobia wasn’t ever well-paired with machísmo. 

In response, the bar initially claimed that it was because the two were smoking e-cigarettes. Then, Gyro’s business Facebook page changed the story to defend their actions, saying in a post that the problem was that they were “dancing inside the business between tables, the bar, and the bathroom,” and that they “even stumbled onto one of the clients.” The post alleges that the employees simply directed both couples to dance outside, as is designated. “Believe me that we are not homophobic at all and we have never had problems with anyone of this kind, and we receive LGBT clients every day,” the restaurant page admin added. According to May, the post was active for just 25 minutes before it was deleted. May tweeted his outrage that “an apology was never offered. THEY ONLY DEFENDED THEIR ACTIONS.”

CBS reporter Begnaud tweeted, “Bar officials now claim the 2 men dancing bumped into people and that’s why they were asked to leave. I asked the gay couple involved & they claim no one mentioned anything about that, only that 2 men were allowed to dance. The bar has changed its story 3 times, so far.”

Since then, the restaurant has come under fire for not giving an adequate apology and placing blame on the gays for feeling “offended.”

CREDIT: @PLASMA_MSJ / TWITTER

“Those apologies are BS,” offered Twitter user Catherine J. Badillo (@LENTJUELA), adding, “The establishment is taking no responsibility for their homophobic actions, and it almost seems like they are blaming the affected part for feeling “offended”.” Finally, the restaurant’s spokespeople have admitted that the employee did use homophobic slurs and that their “doors are open” to receive the LGBT community. In the same post, the admin stated in Spanish, “TO THE BOYS WHO OFFERED OFFENSES. If they communicate with us, we can give them to them personally.” 

“Their apology would have been more sincere if they would not have denied it from the get-go. Now the apology seems like damage control so that their business won’t be affected,” another Twitter user concluded. Meanwhile, Puerto Ricans are offering sincere apologies on behalf of the restaurant. “I am very sorry that you had this bad experience,” Homar Betancourt tweeted, saying “Puerto Rico has many places where the LGBT community is accepted and loved. I am Puerto Rican and places like these we don’t sponsored them when we know of actions like the one that happened to you today. So sorry for that.”

Watch the full video below after they were kicked out of the bar.

READ: More Than A Million People Have Signed A Petition Demanding Netflix Take Down Show Depicting Jesus As A Gay Man

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An Abuelo Got A Hurtful Note From Bad Neighbors About His Decorations And Latino Twitter Came Into Comfort Him

Things That Matter

An Abuelo Got A Hurtful Note From Bad Neighbors About His Decorations And Latino Twitter Came Into Comfort Him

@goldenstef / Twitter

We are rarely more defensive than we are for our abuelos. The viejitos have always been there for us and seeing them treated unkindly is just heartbreaking. That is what one Twitter user experienced after her abuelo got a wretched note about his decorations outside his home.

This is the horrid letter left for @goldenstef’s abuelo by undesirable neighbors.

The letter, which is filled with misspelled words, calls the abuelo’s house an example of a “low class Mexican family.” The letter was written anonymously by neighbors and delivered to the abuelo in an attempt to shame him into changing his decorations. One of the most bizarre moments in the letter is when the angry author criticized the homeowner for having too many American flags claiming he isn’t patriotic and can’t fool the neighbors. Like, which one is it people?

The Twitter user followed up with photos of the house to show the decorations their abuelo has out front.

People flooded the Twitter post with comments supporting and sending love to the abuelo. Fellow Latinos are ready to stand with the abuelo and some just want the names of the people behind the letter so they can talk to them. Some people are stunned at how far the author was willing to go out of their way to be mean to an old man who just wants to decorate his home and front yard.

Latino Twitter wants to come together to let the abuelo know that his decorations are adorbs.

We need to come together to give her abuelo all of the wonderful decoration we love. Let’s turn his house and front yard into a showcase of all of the greatness that Latin America has to offer.

People are falling in love with this viejitos yard.

Honestly, this is a great yard. Who wouldn’t want a yard like this? This yard is original and adorable and worth all of the praise that we can muster. Thank you to people like this for making their yards something unique and worth seeing.

@goldenstef wants everyone to know just how much they appreciate the sweet messages about their abuelo’s yard.

It costs nothing to be kind. It is even better when you can be kind about something someone clearly cares so much about. Who cares if someone decorates their lawn a little too much. At least they are having fun with their lives and that is something we all need more of right now.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

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Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

Fierce

Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

Buda Mendes / Getty

When it comes to celebrating our Latinidad, there’s no denying that Latinos need much more than a month to celebrate our accomplishments, cultures, and contributions. Still, since 1988, people across the country have used Hispanic Heritage Month to commemorate the contributions of Latin Americans in the United States. This month, just like every other month, we’re recognizing and celebrating our Latinidad by sharing stories and moments from our followers.

Recently we asked Latinas on FIERCE to share their memories of some of the most influential Latinos in their lives: their abuelos.

Check out their sweet stories below.

“Ayy mis abuelos; I truly believe they were my soulmates. So many favorite memories. From my grandpa waking up early to start praying and writing his devotionals, to them sitting on the back swing HE MADE praying the rosary, playing backyard baseball with him & my cousins, my grandma sitting outside watching while croquets, watching novelas with her, they were the loves of my life, the sunshine my soul always needed to be happy….I’ll never trade any of my amazing moments with them. My angels; Catalina y Felipe Sustaita.” –melannram

“My abuelito passed away almost 10 years ago now, he was sick ever since I could remember so I was never able to make memories with him. Earlier this year I got to visit the rancho in MX where he raised my dad and tios. A little back story, I have this belief and connection to white butterflies. Whenever I see them or they cross my path I am convinced it’s my abuelito telling me that he’s near or watching over me🤎 anyways, on our way to the ranchito which I had only visited once before when I was about 4, we were guided by these hand sized white butterflies, it was absolutely beautiful. My abuelito really lead us to his casita in the rancho. I could feel his presence and happiness that his grandchildren had the opportunity to visit his home 🤎 this is my favorite memory, this is the memory that I cherish,
– a memory that brings me joy.” –sandra_larios

“Seeing my grandpa make my grandma a cocktail when she came home from a long day at work. He would leave her cocktail for her on the kitchen counter, so it was the first thing she’d see when she walked through the door. They taught me it isn’t always grand gestures, but a lot of the small ones that count.allimae2011

“My abuela started losing her memory early on but she always remembered the story of how she met our Abo until the day she passed. I was the type of kid that kind of resisted learning spanish, but hearing her tell those stories in her beautiful Puerto Rican accent made me fall in love with the language in a way I had never before. I owe my love of spanish and story telling to her. She was a wonderful story teller and I’ll always hold the fondest memories of sitting in her terraza with her 70s furniture, drinking cafecito, and talking about the man who made her fall head over heels in love.” –
alfonsina_mj

“Hearing them talk in the kitchen, drinking their coffee while listening to boleros.”- mel_aguirre1

“Making homemade tortillas with my ama.” – alwaysdulcee

“My Cuban 🇨🇺 Abuelitos riding in the back seat of their Mercedes and watching Abuelo open the door for Abuela every time. My Mexican 🇲🇽 side was making tortillas with Abuela and Abuelo teaching me to drive his truck. At 7 years old!” – brigittecasaus

“Making tamales for us just because.” – angierivera4265

“Cruising with my grandpa, building a studio with grandpa, changing the oil, tire, battery and learning to pump gas with grandpa. But my favorite one, him teaching me to read a clock with a song.” – 2ev37

“Meeting my grandma for the first time when she came to visit us in the US. I was 4 years old! It was so exciting because I would only speak to her in the phone and to finally meet her was a blessing. She was such an amazing lady ! She passed away 7 years ago. I wished she and I could of seen each other more often.” –_lizzylivvy28

“I would sit down on the little old sofa in our living room with my abuelito. He would tell me stories about him when we was younger. I always loved it when he would tell me the story about how he met my abuelita.” –
emigandar

“My grandparents weren’t together anymore, but they we’re 2 special people. My grandpa would always call at the crack of dawn on my birthday. I hated it as a kid, but loved it as an adult. And I’ve missed them the last few years of his life. My grandma would make our birthday cards and send them via mail. When we’d get them they would always be different. I miss those A LOT. They were always personalized and she knew details about the things I was going through so she made them specific to that. It was so special the little things they did for us. We lost my grandma 7 years ago and my grandpa a year ago in July.” –e_bonita89

“They raised me so having coffee with both of them. Eating watermelon with my grandpa and then reading together. Watching old movies together then taking naps. My grandma and I love watching novelas and then talk about them. I still walk with her to 26th street (little Village) or to our nearest aldi.” –melyssa.1997

“Mi abuela used to wake me up on weekends. She would enter the room singing “buenos días su señoría mantantirulirula”. She used to give me a hair brush, and while she was opening the window she would say “brush your hair hija, so the sleep will go away. I opened the window for it to go”. I would brush my hair and convince myself that I got rid of my sleepiness. My grandma is 90 now, and she’s still magic like this.” – iamevyi

“In 7th grade I missed the bus, and I hated missing school, and I cried the entire day because I was scared my parents were going to yell at me, and my grandma stopped my dad before he came in and told him what happened and how it was her fault I missed the bus, because she accidentally unplugged my alarm, even though it wasn’t true.”-
tinnaafaceee

“When my daughter was 6, I took her to visit my grandparents in Mexico. We arrived to the airport at night. It was crowded, a little disoriented, my baby seemed nervous as we were going through customs & she asked me “what if Grandpa can’t find us?”, Just then I saw movement through the large window ahead of us, it was my Abuelito, elbowing his way through the crowd, waving and smiling at us. He was always there when I needed him.” –magpieinaz

“Abuelos? Don’t have them. (Bad joke) They passed before I ever got to meet them. My parents never really talk about them, I think it’s too painful. I often wonder if there are any traits I have from them or if I do anything that my parents might say, oh she got that from my mom/dad. I’m happy my son has all 4 grandparents; I take a billion pictures of him with them.” –_nancysalto

melannramAyy mis abuelos; I truly believe they were my soulmates. So many favorite memories. From my grandpa waking up early to start praying and writing his devotionals, to them sitting on the back swing HE MADE praying the rosary, playing backyard baseball with him & my cousins, my grandma sitting outside watching while croquets, watching novelas with her, they were the loves of my life, the sunshine my soul always needed to be happy….I’ll never trade any of my amazing moments with them. My angels; Catalina y Felipe Sustaita ❤️

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