Things That Matter

Protestors Forced Ted Cruz Out Of A Restaurant Demanding To Know His Thoughts On Brett Kavanaugh

On Sept. 24, Republican Senator Ted Cruz of Texas was publicly ridiculed and harassed for his support of President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Cruz, who’s in the middle of a campaign against Democrat Beto O’Rourke, was at an Italian restaurant in Washington with his wife. Protesters learned of his whereabout and confronted the senator demanding to know his position on Kavanaugh, who is in the middle of an investigation into sexual assault allegations.

Senator Ted Cruz and his wife were confronted Monday by protesters chanting “We believe survivors.”

Sen. Cruz is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is holding hearing on Brett Kavanaugh’s possible lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court. Three women have come forward accusing Kavanaugh of sexual assault and the protesters confronted Cruz to get a definitive answer about his support of Kavanaugh.

“There are now three people who have come forward and who have said that Brett Kavanaugh has attacked them,” the woman said in the video. “I know that you’re close friends with him. Did you talk to him about that? Did you talk to him about his position?”

Kavanaugh — a Republican favorite to be on the Supreme Court — is facing accusations of sexual assault by three women.

CREDIT: @theview

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford was the first to come forward, saying the Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her when they were both in high school in the ’80s. She will be testifying on Thursday in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Cruz sits on that committee with has 21 members, 17 of them are males.

This week Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick both came forward with their own stories of sexual assault allegedly perpetrated by Kavanaugh. Ramirez reported that Kavanaugh had also sexually confronted her with his penis while they were at a party at Yale. Swetnick claims Kavanaugh was present when she was gang raped by a group of high school boys.

Kavanaugh is notably known for being the judge who attempted to block an undocumented teen from getting an abortion.

The 17-year-old was nine weeks into her first trimester and wanted to terminate the pregnancy. Since she was undocumented, officials tried to block her from getting the abortion. The case went to Judge Kavanaugh who also tried to prevent the abortion by delaying the process, which would in turn make it harder to approve if it was later in her pregnancy.

Some believe that if Kavanaugh almost prevented the teen from getting an abortion, he may also reverse abortion laws.

That is why people are concerned with how Cruz will vote. Cruz is a fan of Kavanaugh. CNN reports that in July, Cruz said: “By any measure, Judge Kavanaugh is one of the most respected federal judges in the country, and I look forward to supporting his nomination to the Supreme Court of the United States.”

O’Rourke released a statement saying Cruz should not have been harassed.

Well said, Beto.


READ: Here’s What People Have To Say About Rafael ‘Ted’ Cruz Mocking His Opponent For Using A Nickname

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A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

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One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Things That Matter

One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Mario Tama / Getty Images

On August 3, 2019, a man entered a Walmart in El Paso, Texas and killed 23 customers and injured 23 more. The shooter, Patrick Crusius, went to the Walmart with the expressed purpose of killing Mexican and Mexican-Americans. One year later, the community is remembering those lost.

One year ago today, a man killed 23 people in an El Paso Walmart targeting our community.

The Latino community was stunned when Patrick Crusius opened fire and killed 23 people in El Paso, Texas. The gunman wrote a manifesto and included his desire to kill as many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans he could in the El Paso Walmart. The days after were filled with grieving the loss of 23 people and trying to understand how this kind of hate could exist in our society.

Representative Veronica Escobar, who represents El Paso, is honoring the victims today.

Rep. Escobar was on the scene shortly after the shooting to be there for her community. The shooting was a reminder of the dangers of the anti-Latino and xenophobic rhetoric that the Trump administration was pushing for years.

“One year ago, our community and the nation were shocked and heartbroken by the horrific act of domestic terrorism fueled by racism and xenophobia that killed 23 beautiful souls, injured 22, and devasted all of us,” Rep. Escobar said in a statement. “Today will be painful for El Pasoans, especially for the survivors and the loved ones of those who were killed, but as we grieve and heal together apart, we must continue to face hate with love and confront xenophobia by treating the stranger with dignity and hospitality.”

El Pasoans are coming together today to remember the victims of the violence that day.

Latinos are a growing demographic that will soon eclipse the white communities in several states. Some experts in demographic shifts understand that this could be a terrifying sign for the white population. These changing demographics give life to racist and hateful ideologies.

“When you have a few people of color, the community is not seen so much as a threat,” Maria Cristina Morales, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at El Paso, told USA Today about the fear of changing demographics. “But the more that the population grows – the population of Latinos grow for instance – the more fear that there’s going to be a loss of power.”

The international attack is still felt today because of the constant examples of white supremacy still active today.

“It doesn’t occur to you that there’s a war going on, and there’s always been a war going on—the helicopters the barbed wire—but you just kind of didn’t see it,” David Dorado Romo, an El Paso historian who lost a friend in the shooting, told Time Magazine.

The sudden reminder of the hate out there towards the Latino community was felt nationwide that day. The violent attack that was planned out revealed the true cost of that hate that has been pushed by some politicians.

“El Paso families have the right to live free from fear, and I will continue to honor the victims and survivors with action,” Rep. Escobar said in her statement. “Fighting to end the gun violence and hate epidemics that plague our nation.”

READ: As El Paso Grieves Their Loss, Here Is Everything We Know About The Victims Of The El Paso Massacre, Which Were Mostly Latino

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