Things That Matter

Pregnant Asylum-Seeker With Contractions Sent Back to Mexico to Live in a Tent

You’re in El Salvador. You just found out you’re pregnant with your second child, in a country growing more and more dangerous. The decision is obvious. You take your 3-year-old daughter and make the treacherous journey from El Salvador to the United States, all the while, growing more and more pregnant. After a long journey, you finally arrive at the border to stake your family’s claim for asylum, and, all of a sudden, you start to experience contractions. Just in time, right?

For the anonymous woman whose story this belongs to, timing is everything, but is seemingly meaningless in her case for asylum. U.S. Border Patrol simply gave her medication to stop the contractions and sent her to wait for her hearing, scheduled on November 14, in a tent city, under a bridge in Matamoros, Mexico.

The Salvadoreña likely expected to receive ongoing medical attention, but has since been living in a tent.

@7News / Twitter

At eight-and-a-half-months pregnant, the Salvadoran woman crossed the Rio Grande with her 3-year-old daughter. Agents took her to a the Valley Regional Medical Center, a U.S. hospital, to receive the medical attention she needed. There, she was given medicine to stop the contractions, and was immediately sent back to Matamoros, Mexico to live in a “makeshift tent camp,” according to AP.

Due to give birth any day now, she’s worried she’ll give birth in the street.

@NBCChicago / Twitter

Her lawyer, Jodi Goodwin, told ABC News, “She’s concerned about having the baby in the street or having to have the baby in a shelter.” The Salvadoran mother, who requests to remain anonymous, is scheduled for her asylum hearing on November 14. That also means that she will likely have to care for a newborn infant while living in a tent.

The tent cities in Mexico aren’t any better than the concentration camps in the U.S. Access to meals, clean water and medical care are unreliable. Pregnant woman are especially vulnerable.

Meanwhile, Trump has boasted of his “Remain in Mexico” program as “winning” for the U.S.

The White House / YouTube

After The Washington Post voiced criticism over Trump’s “Summer of Losses,” his campaign immediately pushed out a video claiming a “Summer of Winning” for the administration. The Migrant Protection Protocols, also known as the “Remain in Mexico”, program is considered a win for Trump and a humanitarian crisis for much of the world.

After Trump threatened Mexico with outrageous tariffs, Mexico agreed to the deal, allowing the U.S. to outsource its responsibility toward asylum-seekers to Mexico. Now, asylum seekers are turned away at the border and forced to live in tent cities while they await their court date. Effectively, it prohibits asylum seekers from building a life for themselves, or from having adequate access to housing while they await their court dates.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has exempted “vulnerable populations” from the new policy.

@mollyf / Twitter

But U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is unclear on whether pregnant women fall into that category. In a statement, CBP said, “In some cases, pregnancy may not be observable or disclosed, and may not in and of itself disqualify an individual from being amenable for the program. Agents and officers would consider pregnancy, when other associated factors exist, to determine amenability for the program.”

CBP seems to suggest that they’re off the hook if they can’t ‘obviously’ tell if the woman is pregnant.

@ajplus / Twitter

“In this particular case, this woman was actually taken to the hospital by CBP,” Goodwin told the Associated Press. “There’s no way that CBP could suggest that her pregnancy wasn’t known.” This woman isn’t even the first pregnant woman the U.S. has turned back to Mexico. She is at least the seventh pregnant woman to be turned away since the policy was enacted this summer.

These women are afraid that if their children become Mexican nationals, it would hurt their asylum case.

@photosbylesko / Twitter

On top of that, they are not being provided any services. According to Lina Villa, a Mexican official for Doctors Without Borders, nobody is informing the women of their rights to see a doctor for pre-natal check ups. Mexico offers free, limited health coverage to anyone who asks. The women don’t know they’re allowed to ask. They don’t even know where to go when the time comes to give birth.

For the Trump administration, this is what “winning” looks like.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Things That Matter

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

Things That Matter

Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

When it comes to international happiness rankings, Mexico has long done well in many measurements. In fact, in 2019, Mexico placed number 23 beating out every other Latin American country except for Costa Rica. But in 2020, things looks a lot different as the country slipped 23 spots on the list. What does this mean for Mexico and its residents? 

Mexico slips 23 spots on the World Happiness Report thanks to a variety of compelling factors.

Mexico plummeted 23 places to the 46th happiest nation in the world, according to the 2020 happiness rankings in the latest edition of the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The coronavirus pandemic had a significant impact on Mexicans’ happiness in 2020, the new report indicates.

“Covid-19 has shaken, taken, and reshaped lives everywhere,” the report noted, and that is especially true in Mexico, where almost 200,000 people have lost their lives to the disease and millions lost their jobs last year as the economy recorded its worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Based on results of the Gallup World Poll as well as an analysis of data related to the happiness impacts of Covid-19, Mexico’s score on the World Happiness Report index was 5.96, an 8% slump compared to its average score between 2017 and 2019 when its average ranking was 23rd.

The only nations that dropped more than Mexico – the worst country to be in during the pandemic, according to an analysis by the Bloomberg news agency – were El Salvador, the Philippines and Benin.

Mexico has struggled especially hard against the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the pandemic started, Mexico has fared far worse than many other countries across Latin America. Today, there are reports that Mexico has been undercounting and underreporting both the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths. Given this reality, the country is 2nd worst in the world when it comes to number of suspected deaths, with more than 200,000 people dead. 

Could the happiness level have an impact on this year’s elections?

Given that Mexico’s decline in the rankings appears related to the severity of the coronavirus pandemic here, one might assume that the popularity of the federal government – which has been widely condemned for its management of the crisis from both a health and economic perspective – would take a hit.

But a poll published earlier this month found that 55.9% of respondents approved of President López Obrador’s management of the pandemic and 44% indicated that they would vote for the ruling Morena party if the election for federal deputies were held the day they were polled.

Support for Morena, which apparently got a shot in the arm from the national vaccination program even as it proceeded slowly, was more than four times higher than that for the two main opposition parties, the PAN and the PRI.

Still, Mexico’s slide in the happiness rankings could give López Obrador – who has claimed that ordinary Mexicans are happier with him in office – pause for thought.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com