Things That Matter

Primary Elections Are Happening All Over The Country Right Now. Here’s What You Should Know About These Elections

Since President Trump won the 2016 elections, there has been a surge in Democratic people of color and women entering politics and running for office around the country for the first time. All of the candidates have focused on one thing: getting people to vote. With the primary season underway, people are putting their names and careers on the line to fight for a better future for all Americans from women’s rights to immigration rights.

While there’s a record amount of women running for office this year, there’s also an increase in Latinos running for a government seat.

Some primary elections have already taken place, and Latinos have won their respective seats (see winners below), which means there’s a great wave of change coming to Washington. However, there’s still plenty of primary elections that have yet to take place. Here’s a list of the Latinos that running this year and hope to represent all Americans.

Winner: Democrat Lupe Valdez, running for Governor of Texas.

Watch Live as Lupe Valdez accepts the Democratic Nomination!

Posted by Lupe Valdez on Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Valdez has a long career in law enforcement that started with being a federal agent and led to her being the first Latina sheriff in the U.S. She served as sheriff for Dallas County for four terms before she decided to run for governor of Texas in the hopes of being the first lesbian Latina to hold the office.

Democrat Randy Bryce, running for Congress in Wisconsin. Primary Election date: Aug. 14.

Randy Bryce is of Mexican and Polish descent and a  U.S. Army veteran, cancer survivor, and union ironworker. This is Bryce’s first attempt at a politician. He is running for Wisconsin’s 1st Congressional District currently held by Speaker Paul Ryan.

In an interview with mitu, Chief Operating Officer Jessica Reeves at Voto Latino says Latinos are getting into politics because there’s a lack of representation.

“I think people are realizing that in order to have our issues heard, we as Latinos need to make sure we’re represented not only at the polls but in elected office,” Reeves said. “A number of programs like Run for Something and our own Power Summit leadership program are training and encouraging people from all walks of life to step up and start a life of public service.”

Democrat Nelson Araujo, running for Nevada Secretary of State; Primary Election Date: June 12.

These two. ❤️

A post shared by Nelson Araujo (@nelsonaraujonv) on

Nelson Araujo is the son of parents who were refugees from the Salvadoran Civil War. He was raised by his mother, who worked as a housekeeper in a hotel.

Winner: Democrat Texas Congresswoman Veronica Escobar.

Veronica Escobar is a third-generation El Pasoan. She has served as County Judge and County Commissioner for El Paso, Texas before running for Texas’s 16th Congressional District.

Winner: Democrat Texas Senator Sylvia Garcia.

Sylvia Garcia won her race with 63 percent of the vote and would join Escobar by becoming one of the first two Latinas to Congress if they win the midterm elections. Garcia is running to represent Texas’s 29th Congressional District.

Winner: Democratic  Chicago Congressman Jésus “Chuy” García.

Posted by Jesus "Chuy" Garcia on Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Jesus “Chuy” García was born in Durango, Mexico, and has severed as representative on the Cook County Board of Commissioners in Illinois. His father was a farm laborer under the U.S government’s World War II-era bracero program. Garcia is running for Rep. Luis Gutiérrez’s seat representing Illinois’s 4th Congressional District.

Democrat Juana Matias running for Congress in Massachusetts. Primary election date: Sept. 4.

According to Ballot Pedia, Juana Matias was first elected to the Massachusetts chamber in 2016. She says she’s a “product of the American Dream,” and was a raised by a blue-collar family. She is running or Massachusetts’s 3rd Congressional District.

Democrat Michelle Lujan Grisham running for Governor of New Mexico. Primary election date: June 5.

Michelle Lujan was born in Los Alamos, New Mexico, and grew up in Santa Fe, and serves New Mexico’s 1st Congressional District on the House Agriculture and Budget Committees. She is currently the Chair for the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

Democrat David Garcia running for Governor of Arizona. Primary election date: Aug. 28.

David Garcia is fourth generation Arizonan “and an infantry marksman who was raised to value service and integrity, Democrat,” according to his website.

Winner: Democrat Alma Anaya Cook County Commissioner in Chicago.

Alma Anaya, born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, and a graduate from Gwendolyn Brooks College Prep. She earned a bachelor’s degree in communication from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Winner: Democrat Rep. Aaron Ortiz for Illinois.

"The Progressive Change Campaign Committee (BoldProgressives.org) is a million-member grassroots organization building…

Posted by Aaron Ortiz for State Rep on Sunday, March 11, 2018

Aaron “Chuy” Garcia is a son of immigrants from Durango, Mexico. The young politician and educator is running to be the state representative of Illinois’s 1st district.

Democrat Debbie Mucarsel-Powell running for Congress in Florida. Primary election date: Aug. 28.

Debbie Mucarsel-Powell is a first-generation American who has built a career working for numerous non-profits around south Florida. Mucarsel-Powell is running to unseat Republican incumbent Rep. Carlos Curbelo.

Democrat Virginia Madueño running for Congress in California. Primary election date: June 5.

Posted by Virginia Madueño for Congress District 10 on Thursday, April 26, 2018

Virginia Madueño is a local business owner and served as mayor of Riverbank. She running to represent the voices of California’s 10th Congressional District.

Democrat Antoinette Sedillo-Lopez running for Congress in New Mexico. Primary election date: June 5.

According to Ballot Pedia, Antoinette Sedillo-Lopez “graduated from the University of New Mexico and the UCLA School of Law. She taught law at the UNM for 27 years and remains an emeritus law professor. She serves as the executive director of Enlace, an anti-domestic violence nonprofit conducting outreach to Latino immigrant communities.” She is running for New Mexico’s 1st Congressional District.

Democrat Xochitl Torres Small running for Congress in New Mexico. Primary election date: June 5.

Posted by Xochitl for Congress on Thursday, January 11, 2018

“As a child, Xochitl heard stories about her grandmother, who immigrated here from Mexico, working in the fields to build her American dream,” her website states. “Xochitl watched her mom, who goes to school early and stays long after the last bell has rung to help her students succeed. Xochitl saw her father consistently go the extra mile as a social worker to help those who are too often pushed aside.  She learned the importance of having your neighbor’s back – something Congress doesn’t seem to care about anymore.”

Democrat January Contreras running for Attorney General in Arizona. Primary election date: Aug. 28.

ENDORSEMENT: As a K-12 product of Arizona's public schools, I am honored to be endorsed by the Arizona Education…

Posted by January Contreras on Friday, May 11, 2018

“As a Deputy County Attorney, Assistant Attorney General, founder of a not-for-profit and, most importantly, as a mother to two children, January has always been driven to protect others,” her website states.

Democrat Gil Cisneros running for Congress in California. Primary election date: June 5.

Ready for the game. @fullertonhoops #TuskUp #MarchMadness???? #CA39

A post shared by Gil Cisneros for Congress (@gilcisnerosca) on

Gil Cisneros is the first in his family to graduate from college, and is the son of a public school cafeteria worker and a Vietnam veteran. He attended college on a Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (R.O.T.C.) scholarship, and graduated with a B.A. in Political Science from The George Washington University. He is running to represent California’s 39th Congressional District.

While it’s an incredible accomplishment to have so many Latino running for office, Reeves says Latino voters shouldn’t feel obligated to vote for Latinos, simply because they’re Latino.

“At the end of the day the most important thing for a Latino voter is to elect someone that will represent their issues and values, not their ethnicity,” Reeves said.

For a full list of primary elections, visit the National Conference of State Legislatures.


READ: From New York To San Diego, These Candidates Are Standing Up For Their Latino Communities

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The Miami Herald Apologizes For Including Racist, Anti-Semitic Insert In Newspaper

Things That Matter

The Miami Herald Apologizes For Including Racist, Anti-Semitic Insert In Newspaper

@BillCorben / Twitter

Readers of the Miami Herald and the El Nuevo Herald noticed a racist and anti-Semitic insert in one of the latest editions. The column in the insert compared BLM activists to Nazis while talking down about the Jewish community.

The Miami Herald recently published a racist and anti-Semitic insert.

The offensive piece, written by Cuban exile Roberto Luque Escalona, received harsh and immediate backlash. Escalona expresses his displeasure for the Jewish community and those seeking racial justice by joining BLM with one column.

“What kind of people are these Jews” writes Escalona. He then continues to “teach” Jewish people the history of the Holocaust and claims that BLM supporters are worse than the Nazis during Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, because the Nazis simply destroyed things and didn’t steal.

The newspaper has apologized for the insert going so far as to admit that it was not properly vetted and that “internal failures” were at play.

According to an open letter, higher ups at the Miami Herald admit to the insert not being read and vetted by the staff. The obvious overlook led to a 40-page insert of right-wing propaganda to be distributed to the readers of both the Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald. Since the publication, the Miami Herald claims to have ended their relationship with Libre, the insert with the racist and anti-Semitic content.

Those responsible at the Miami Herald admitted to not reading the insert before it was distributed.

“We are deeply sorry that inflammatory, racist and anti-Semitic commentary reached our el Nuevo Herald subscribers through LIBRE, a Spanish-language publication that paid our company to have the product printed and inserted into our print edition as a weekly supplement,” reads part of an open letter to readers. “The fact that no one in leadership, beginning with us, had previously read this advertising insert until this issue was surfaced by a reader is distressing. It is one of a series of internal failures that we are investigating in order to prevent this from ever recurring.”

Readers are outraged that the newspaper would allow such offensive things to be published and distributed.

The right-wing conspiracies pushed by Libre are part of a larger Spanish-language disinformation campaign targeting Cubans in southern Florida. The community has been inundated with disinformation ahead of the 2020 election preying on the fears and ignorance within the staunchly conservative Cuban community.

“It’s difficult to measure the effect exactly, but the polling sort of shows it and in focus groups it shows up, with people deeply questioning the Democrats, and referring to the ‘deep state’ in particular — that there’s a real conspiracy against the president from the inside,” Eduardo Gamarra, a pollster and director of the Latino Public Opinion Forum at Florida International University, told Politico. “There’s a strain in our political culture that’s accustomed to conspiracy theories, a culture that’s accustomed to coup d’etats.”

The disinformation is targeting Cubans because of the growing Latino communities who tend to vote Democratic.

According to Politico, the campaign is Cuban specific. The Puerto Rican, Nicaraguan, Colombian, Venezuelan, and Dominican communities in Florida, which continue to grow, typically vote Democratic. These shifting demographics have left Republicans doing anything it takes to keep a strong hold of the Cuban community, even by means of racism, anti-Semitism, and disinformation.

READ: Politicians Need To Stop Assuming That The Latino Vote Is A Monolith Because It Is Not The Truth

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Latinos For Trump Posted A Collage Of Flag For Hispanic Heritage Month And Got Some Wrong

Culture

Latinos For Trump Posted A Collage Of Flag For Hispanic Heritage Month And Got Some Wrong

Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Latinos for Trump has long been a confusing organization in the Latino community. President Donald Trump has built his administration and brand to be squarely against people of color. Now, the Latinos for Trump group caused a stir when they posted a collage of flags that are not quite right.

Latinos for Trump really thought they had something when they posted their Hispanic Heritage Month collage.

The first, and most obvious mistake, is that the Mexican flag is backwards. The flag is supposed to be green, white, and red in that order. As we can all see, the collage has a Mexican flag that is red, white, and green. The eagle is even facing the wrong way so someone literally flipped the flag the wrong way.

Of course, some people tried to make sense of the bizarre Mexican flag snafu.

Last year, the Trump administration announced that it was cutting aid to three countries in Central America. The countries were El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Fox & Friends picked up the story but told their audience that Trump was cutting aid to “3 Mexican countries.” Perhaps this Twitter user is right and the Latinos for Trump are trying to suggest the existence of other Mexicos.

Someone else pointed out the issues with the Guatemalan flag in the top right corner.

People are very defensive about their cultural heritage and national origin. Messing up someone’s flag is a very serious issue for people. Just ask a Cuban or Puerto Rican about people confusing their flags. It is never a good thing.

Some people fixed the image for them so the organization can see what it should have looked like.

Good, clean lines with all of the flags facing the right way. The creator even changed the message in the middle for the Latino community. It is clear that social media is still willing to show up and teach a couple of lessons here and there.

Others had a more direct message for Latinos for Trump.

We all know that social media is where things go to be manipulated and made fun of. It is very important that if you make something for social media that you take good care to make sure that you check all of the right boxes and execute your work right the first time.

READ: In A Seriously Awkward Announcement, Vice President Pence Went To Florida To Launch A ‘Latinos For Trump’ Coalition

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