Things That Matter

Los Angeles City Council Votes To Replace Columbus Day With Indigenous Peoples Day

In a landmark move, the Los Angeles City Council voted on Wednesday in favor of replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day as an official holiday in the city of L.A.

The motion, which won in a near unanimous 14-1 vote, was originally submitted to the Los Angeles City Council back in 2015 by Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell. Los Angeles now joins Seattle, Minneapolis, Santa Cruz and Berkeley, as well as five states, in replacing Columbus Day (Oct. 9) with Indigenous People’s Day, as reported by CBS Los Angeles.

In the initial motion, Councilmember O’Farrell wrote:

Native Americans are descendants of the aboriginal, indigenous, native people who were the original inhabitants of this continent. One way to recognize the enormous historical contributions of Native American heritage and Indigenous People is through celebrations of culture, recognition of traditions, and the continued support of artistic self-expression. The City of Los Angeles has a rich and unique history and diversity represented within the indigenous population residing here.

Councilmember O’Farrell called Indigenous Peoples Day a “fitting holiday that we can all be proud of,” and expressed his joy in making “history in Los Angeles.”

In a statement following the vote, he said the reasons for replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day are “clear” because the “historical record is unambiguous, referring to the atrocities that came after the arrival, and at the hands of, Columbus in America. He also encouraged people to Google Columbus if they weren’t aware of this history.

“Today is a moment where we took a step that is righteous, that is just, that is healing and that is historically clear,” he said in his statement. “Only when we acknowledge the truth can we heal.”

Watch Councilmember O’Farrell’s full statement below:

Indigenous Peoples Day will remain a paid holiday for city workers. Major pushback on the holiday came from members of the local Italian-American community, who felt that removing Columbus Day from holiday calendars meant erasing their heritage. Columbus was Italian.

The Los Angeles City Council responded by making Oct. 12 Italian-American Heritage Day.

The city council hearing was packed with supporters of the new holiday.

When the vote came through, supporters jumped from their seats in celebration.

Indigenous groups also celebrated the victory with dance and prayer inside City Hall.

The support on Twitter has also been strongly in favor of Indigenous Peoples Day, with many seeing it as the positive step towards healing.

But, more importantly, some see it as a way to correct history.

While there have been some haters online, the major sentiment on Indigenous Peoples Day is pride.


READ: Why The NoDAPL Movement Has A Deeper Meaning For Me As An Afro-Indigenous Caribbean Latina

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New Netflix Docuseries Explores The Summer The Night Stalker Terrorized Los Angeles

Entertainment

New Netflix Docuseries Explores The Summer The Night Stalker Terrorized Los Angeles

Richard Ramirez, a.k.a. The Night Stalker, spent the summer of 1985 terrorizing Los Angeles. Ramirez murdered 13 people during his reign of terror in Southern California. Netflix’s new docuseries is exploring the crime by interviewing law enforcement and family of the victims.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial” killer is now streaming on Netflix.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial Killer” is the latest Netflix docuseries diving into the true crimes that have shaped American society. Richard Ramirez is one of the most prolific serial killers of all time and single-handedly terrorized Los Angeles during the summer of 1985.

Ramirez fundamentally changed Los Angeles and the people who live there. The serial killer was an opportunistic killer. He would break into homes using unlocked doors and opened windows. Once inside, he would rape, murder, rob, and assault the people inside the home.

The documentary series explores just how Ramirez was able to keep law enforcement at bay for so long. The killer did not have a standard modus operandi. His victims ran the gamut of gender, age, and race. There was no indicator as to who could be next. He also rarely used the same weapon when killing his victims. Some people were stabbed to death while others were strangled and others still were bludgeoned.

While not the first telling of Ramirez’s story, it is the most terrifying account to date.

“Victims ranged in age from 6 to 82,” director Tiller Russell told PEOPLE. “Men, women, and children. The murder weapons were wildly different. There were guns, knives, hammers, and tire irons. There was this sort of feeling that whoever you were, that anybody could be a victim and anybody could be next.”

Family members of the various victims speak in the documentary series about learning of the horror committed to them. People remember grandparents and neighbors killed by Ramirez. All the while, police followed every lead to make sure they left no stone unturned.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial Killer” is now streaming on Netflix.

READ: Here’s How An East LA Neighborhood Brought Down One Of America’s Most Notorious Serial Killers

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A Tourist Was Arrested For Illegally Climbing Up The Pyramid of Kukulkán

Culture

A Tourist Was Arrested For Illegally Climbing Up The Pyramid of Kukulkán

It is important to be a responsible tourist. This means following rules, acting responsibly, and not violating sacred places. That is something one tourist learned the hard way when she climbed the Pyramid of Kukulkán in Chichén Itzá.

Here’s the video of a tourist running down the steps of the Pyramid of Kukulkán.

The Pyramid of Kukulkán is one of the most iconic examples of Pre-Hispanic architecture and culture in Mesoamerica. The UNESCO World Heritage Site is one of the most visited archeological sites in Mexico. In 2017, more than 2 million visitors descended on the site.

Of course, #LadyKukulkan started to trend on Twitter.

You know that Twitter was ready to start calling out this woman for her actions. According to Yucatán Expat Life Magazine, the woman was there to honor her husband’s dying wish. The woman, identified as a tourist from Tijuana, wanted to spread her husband’s ashes on the top of the pyramid, which it seems that she did.

The video was a moment for Mexican Twitter.

Not only was she arrested by security when she descended, but the crowd was also clearly against her. Like, what was she even thinking? It isn’t like the pyramid is crawling with tourists all over it. She was the only person climbing the pyramid, which is federally owned and cared for.

The story is already sparking ideas for other people when they die.

“Me: (to my parents) Have you read about #ladykukulkan?
My Dad: Yes! (to my mom) When I die, I want you to scatter my ashes in the National Palace so they call you “Lady Palace,” sounds better, no?” wrote @hania_jh on Twitter.

READ: Mexico’s Version Of Burning Man Became A COVID-19 Super-Spreader Event Thanks To U.S. Tourists

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