politics

NYC Mayor Bill De Blasio Thought He Was Clever With #ConDon Until Latinos Came Through With A Spanish Language Lesson

Gage Skidmore / Flickr / onecondoms / Instagram

New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio just announced his run in the crowded race for the Presidential Democratic primary. Since then, Trump has tweeted out that De Blasio is “the worst mayor in the U.S.,” and Trump Jr. is reportedly considering a run for Mayor of New York.

Within hours of his announcement to run for President, De Blasio “coined” the term ‘Con Don.’ He was referring to President Donald Trump as a con man but Latinos and Spanish-speakers took a pause and wanted to let DeBlasio know a few things.

Bill De Blasio started it all with a video he tweeted calling out President Trump and included #ConDon.

“I am going to keep calling him Con Don because that’s what he deserves to be called,” De Blasio told The Gothamist. “Any good New Yorker who’s watched a game of three-card monte or any other example of the way some in this city try to get one over on others—we’re a pretty streetwise people. We know a con man.”

This led Latinos to give De Blasio a quick little Spanish lesson because everyone can use a Spanish lesson.

@J__Velasquez / Twitter

You don’t need to go to Twitter school to have a public platform on Twitter because Twitter will school you. Thankfully, this Latina reporter said what was on everybody’s minds.

It’s almost like he doesn’t have any Spanish-speakers around him to bounce ideas off of.

@ValeRicciulli / Twitter

Any Presidential candidate should have Spanish speaking advisors, no? Let this be a lesson to all 23 Democratic candidates: hire Spanish speakers.

Some were exasperated that he didn’t just use the existing #DonTheCon hashtag.

@Shandy556 / Twitter

It’s in that order for a reason, and the person who came up with #DonTheCon knew it. De Blasio has the highest unfavorability rating of all the Democrats running in the primaries.

Truth: Latinos needed this laugh.

@CatalinaCruzNY / Twitter

Some had been thinking about it all day and once Josefa Velasquez said it out loud, everyone started peeing their pants. Welcome to the Spanish-speaking-politically-minded-Latinos-on-the-internet subculture’s inside joke of the week.

Yeah, we really had a good time with this one. 😂

@miblogestublog / Twitter

During a climate when varying forms of birth control are highly stigmatized and veiled by a double standard, we have to agree with Laura. If we want to MAGA, we have to MCGA.

Okay, and then we got into semantics.

@Lawdavisito / Twitter

There was no accent on the “Don” when it came out of De Blasio’s mouth, soo… If there were, the clip would make it to a private Latino comedy screening.

But if there’s no accent, then it means we’re with Don?

@gdelenes / Twitter

So the options are “condom” or “With Don.” It is clear what saying Latinos are lining up for and it is safe to say that it is not “with Don.”

Regardless, New York is really truly going after Don.

@lolitadiaz73 / Twitter

In a wild turn of events, the New York state legislature just gave explicit legal permission for tax officials to comply with Congressional subpoenas. That means it’s no longer up to Trump to evade subpoenas to stop an investigation. Investigations into his finances can now happen in New York.

At the very least, we all learned something today.

@Cascades_VA / Twitter

We’ll say it louder for people in the back. 👏 Hire 👏 Spanish 👏 speaking 👏 Latinos 👏 . Punto.

READ: Here’s One Way To Use Condoms That You Probably Didn’t Expect

Julián Castro Is Promising To Confront The Growing Housing Crisis In The US With An Ambitious Housing Plan

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Julián Castro Is Promising To Confront The Growing Housing Crisis In The US With An Ambitious Housing Plan

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Presidential hopeful Julián Castro has just unveiled a plan that will address housing discrimination, homelessness and increase homeownership. The plan, part of his “People First” policy, is an area that Castro is quite familiar with as he served as secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under President Obama. He is now using some of that experience to push forward with a plan to tackle increasingly difficult housing issues in the U.S.

Castro wants to expand housing assistance programs for the poor and give renters a tax credit.

Credit: @NBCLatino/Twitter

In unveiling the first installment of his three-part housing plan, Castro voiced the concerns that many renters and potential home buyers are feeling across the country. As home and rent prices have risen to historic numbers, many are a bad bounce or missed paycheck from living on the streets.

His housing proposal focuses on expanding federally funded vouchers to help at-risk Americans pay their rent, creating a refundable tax credit for Americans whose rent exceeds 30 percent of their income and bolster the supply of affordable housing units.

“People are experiencing an affordable housing crisis, whether they live in a red or blue community, whether they are white or black. This rental affordability touches the lives of so many,” Castro said.

Castro’s plan includes improving Section 8, a housing assistance program, which subsidizes the housing of almost 5.3 million Americans in low-income households. The program is currently only helping 25 percent of eligible families. Castro wants to expand that number and transform the program to “a fully-funded entitlement program” similar to food stamps or Social Security.

A person making the federal minimum wage ($7.25/hour) is unable to afford a two-bedroom rental in any state. Castro wants to change this.

Credit: @kylegriffin/Twitter

Housing affordability is an issue that Castro has heard time and time again on the campaign trail. He wants to change this by increasing the number of affordable housing units. This will include putting money towards the construction of additional public housing and through the expansion of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit.

Another issue he wants to address is reducing America’s homelessness epidemic. Castro says he will create new government housing targets, increase assistance grants and invest in a variety of programs designed to help individuals who are homeless or at risk. His plan would also decriminalize homelessness and put an end to laws that discriminate against those without homes.

“Those experiencing homelessness are our most vulnerable citizens. They are single adults, veterans, families with young children, and kids on their own,” Castro said. “I know that when the public sector invests effort and money into ending homelessness — as we did during the Obama administration — we make a difference.”

According to HUD’s 2018 Annual Homeless Assessment Report, there were about 553,000 people experiencing homelessness every night in 2018. Castro predicts that his new initiative would end homelessness for veterans and children by the end of 2024 and put a stop to chronic homelessness by the end of 2028.

Castro has also included plans for environmentally sustainable housing.

Credit:@fairweatherphd

Castro’s second part of his plan describes investing in “climate-driven” initiatives as part of an effort to achieve net-zero global greenhouse emissions by 2050 and “meet the promise of the Green New Deal.” The Green New Deal, which was introduced by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), is a plan that calls to make the U.S. carbon neutral by 2030.

Castro’s environmental plan would establish a $200 billion Green Infrastructure Fund that would fund local and national natural energy projects. This includes increasing and steadily improving public transportation, make buildings more energy efficient, and add more public electric vehicle charging stations.

While many support the plan or ones similar to Castro’s, it begs the question of how will this all be paid for?

Credit:@gabeortiz/Twitter

According to his campaign, Castro’s housing initiatives would cost at least $970 billion over the span of 10 years, which includes $410 billion to expand the rent voucher program. While Castro’s plans for solving the U.S. housing crisis are definitely lofty, research and numbers show that the situation is only getting worse.

“I’m committed to working toward prosperity for every single American no matter their background,” Castro told NBC News. “The fact is in our nation’s history, poverty and racism have been so intertwined that we need to address both at the same time.”

READ: Julian Castro Is Running For President On A Platform Of Giving A Pathway To Citizenship For 11 Million People

Graffiti Is Popping Up On NYC Subway Cars Again And Not Everyone Knows How To Feel About It

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Graffiti Is Popping Up On NYC Subway Cars Again And Not Everyone Knows How To Feel About It

Back in the ’70s and ’80s graffiti art thrived in New York City, especially on subway trains. All of that changed in the ’90s and today it’s extremely rare to see a moving subway train with graffiti on it. It just doesn’t happen mainly because artists would risk getting arrested if caught spray painting a train. But things might be changing, and it’s so refreshing to see.

A working Q train on 96th Street station in New York City was covered in brilliant graffiti art.

Credit: @MrEdgardoNYC / Twitter

The images went viral on social media earlier this week because you just don’t see this kind of art display anymore. The New York Post spoke to an MTA official, and they said the artist probably painted the train while it was parked in the station overnight. We could have sworn all MTA subway stations had surveillance cameras everywhere. We suppose the artist is extra slick.

The artist has not come forward to claim their work.

Credit: @NYCAntifa / Twitter

They’d probably be arrested if they did.

“If they can go back there and have the time to do all of that graffiti, they have time to do something to the train,” Train conductor Tramell Thompson, a transit activist who runs the Progressive Action Facebook page said to the Post. “It’s obvious they have no security back there.”

If artists know that no one is watching the trains overnight, we may have another resurgence of subway graffiti art on our hands once again.

Credit: @JMartinezNYC / Twitter

However, what may look cool to some commuters doesn’t sit well with local lawmakers. According to The City, in 2018, New York City Transit spent $610,956 to clean graffiti, which they say was “an increase of 364% from the $131,539 spent just two years earlier.”

Here’s how some people are taking the news about new subway graffiti art.

Credit: @yerrritsdsy / Twitter

It’s beautiful artwork.

The artist must know this area is not monitored by security.

Credit: @SKastenbaum / Twitter

Some say that the job had to be completed by more than one person so it could get done fast.

When you’re working on a time constraint, the adrenaline gets you moving fast.

Credit: @Horace_Badun / Twitter

They are master craftsman.

The more exposure it gets, the more people will get inspired.

Credit: @trips760 / Twitter

We hope to see more of it!

READ: Graffiti Artist Completes Inspiring Mural in Oakland, CA

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