Things That Matter

People Are Furious That The Peruvian Government Is Risking Machu Picchu By Building An Airport Near The Site

There’s a reason why historical grounds are considered sacred. Ancient areas in the world are part of our history. They are a glimpse of what life was like thousands of years before. For avid travelers that seek to visit these historical areas, they understand the value and privilege of what it’s like to be there. As such, we try to protect it for future generations to come. That’s what makes what is happening near Machu Picchu so frustrating for the international community.

Peru is constructing the Chinchero International Airport near the Andes mountains, which is packed with Incan relics.

The government broke ground on the ancient grounds earlier this year. According to KUNC, the airport will be built in the “mouth of the Sacred Valley” and will be a multi-billion-dollar project.

The airport is expected to transport more than 7 million people a year, but some are wondering how the traffic and pollution will affect these parts that are valuable to history.

“The airport planned to be built in Chinchero, Cusco, endangers the conservation of one of the most important historical and archaeological sites in the world,” a petition on Change.org states. “An airport in the surroundings of the Sacred Valley will affect the integrity of a complex Inca landscape and will cause irreparable damage due to noise, traffic, and uncontrolled urbanization.”

Peruvian officials claim there are no Incan artifacts located in the construction area.

The main problem is Machu Picchu is already getting more tourists than it should. The Guardian reports that “more than 1.5 million visitors in 2017, almost double the limit recommended by UNESCO, putting a huge strain on the fragile ruins and local ecology.”

We recently saw the devastating effects from Mt. Everest, which shows what happens when people go to a tourist area thinking anyone can handle it. More people are dying as they climb Mt. Everest and they’re also leaving massive amounts of trash behind.

If the government wants to make travel easier to Machu Picchu why couldn’t they think of a better alternative instead of damaging their main money-making tourist spot?

The government reiterates that the reason it has taken so long to get this airport approved is that they have conducted several studies to make sure the area is not hurt by the construction.

“It is a project of many years, for which all the studies have been carried out, it will solve the problem that now exists with the Velasco Astete Airport and projects an important growth of the tourist activity of Cusco, ” Guillermo Cortés, Vice Minister of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Industries of the Ministry of Culture, told a Spanish news outlet in Peru. He added, “that the Chinchero Airport is also a project that is developed in an area for which all the precautions and precautions have been taken so as not to affect the heritage.”

Click here for more information on what is happening and how you can get involved.

READ: Peru’s Former President Alan Garcia Commits Suicide As Police Attempt Arrest In Corruption Charges

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Peruvian Rocker Diana Flores Goes Disco With New Single “Desaparecer”

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Peruvian Rocker Diana Flores Goes Disco With New Single “Desaparecer”

Peruvian indie rocker Diana Flores is marking a new phase in her career with “Desaparecer.” The former Baby Steps frontwoman has gone solo with the disco-influenced single.

Diana was originally a rocker in the band Baby Steps.

Flores is most known as the frontwoman of bands like Kasama and Baby Steps in Peru. Both bands were part of the country’s indie rock wave. In Baby Steps, the Lima native shredded on the guitar. Baby Steps’ music was equally raucous and ethereal like in “Molly.”

The COVID-19 quarantine inspired Diana to push herself as a solo artist.

Antonella Morelli

While in quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic, Flores discovered that she could make music on her own. She also pushed herself to “step out of [her] comfort zone” and tackle new sounds. Flores’ debut solo single “Desaparecer” was produced by Marshall Did It Again, who previously worked with Lil Mosey and Jowell of Jowell y Randy.

“2020 turned out to be one of my most creative years, not just in music, but in general,” Flores said in a statement. “Spending time with myself without feeling external pressure and evaluating my strengths have made this project off to the best start. Not only do I feel safe with the result of ‘Desaparecer’ but happy to finally be able to experiment with other genres.”

“Desaparecer” is a disco-pop dream en español.

After disco-pop gripped the globe last year thanks to The Weeknd and Dua Lipa, Flores followed their lead with “Desaparecer.” In the sleek and sexy track, she sings about getting lost with a lover on the dance floor. Her rock star edge is still intact with an incredible guitar solo. The dazzling “Desaparecer” hopefully leads to more disco escapism that we desperately need in Spanish.

Flores also noted that the song was her way of coping with last year’s political strife in Peru. Massive protests happened following the removal of President Martín Vizcarra. The shocking move was seen as a coup by many. Two protesters were killed in a clash in November and Vizcarra’s replacement Manuel Merino resigned after five days in office.

“‘Desaparecer’ was born after a very strong anxiety crisis due to everything that was happening last year in the country,” Flores added.

UPDATE: The music video is here.

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Read: Dominican Duo Martox is Keeping Latin Alternative Music Alive with “Mente”

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Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

Things That Matter

Indigenous Purépecha Woman Gets Full Ride Scholarship To Attend Harvard

In just a few months, college freshmen will be descending on their campuses across the country. One of these students is Elizabeth Esteban who is the first person from her indigenous tribe in Mexico to be accepted to an Ivy League school.

Elizabeth Esteban is going to Harvard and it is a major deal.

Esteban is a member of the Purépecha tribe, an indigenous community from Michoacán, Mexico. Esteban is the first member of her tribe to be accepted into an Ivy League university, where indigenous representation remains small. Esteban’s parents work as farm laborers in the eastern Coachella Valley in California.

“Well I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News.

Not only was Esteban accepted into Harvard, a prestigious university, she also received a full-ride scholarship. Esteban’s family is part of a community of hundreds of Purépecha people who relocated to the easter Coachella Valley in search of work and a better life.

Esteban plans to study political science.

Dr. Ruiz Speaks with State of the Union Guest, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School.

Join me for a live conversation with my guest for tonight's State of the Union, Elizabeth from Desert Mirage High School!

Posted by Congressman Raul Ruiz, MD on Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Esteban wants to make a difference in her community. As an indigenous woman, Esteban wants to break barriers that are set on women in her community. She told NBC News that her community expects for women to stay home and be stay-at-home mothers.

The incoming Harvard freshmen was discouraged from applying to Harvard at one point because of her community’s unreliable internet connection. Esteban lives in a mobile home with her family in Mecca and struggled to complete course work. The internet went down in the middle of her Harvard interview and it almost prevented her from applying to the university.

“Well, I felt proud and excited, every sort of emotion because I never would have believed that a person like me, would be accepted to a prestigious university,” Esteban told NBC News about being accepted to Harvard on a full scholarship.

READ: California, Harvard, MIT File Lawsuits To Challenge Government’s International Student Visa Announcement

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