Things That Matter

Hospital Officials At This Oregon Hospital Just Changed Their Policy To Help Undocumented Patients

Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) officials have reversed a policy that barred undocumented immigrants from getting transplants. The decision was made after an undocumented Oregon mother of four was denied a life-saving liver transplant because she is undocumented. Silvia Lesama-Santos is 46 and is covered under her husbands health insurance but a letter from OHSU stated that she was ineligible for a liver transplant because she didn’t have a lawful presence in the U.S., according to The Oregonian.

The American Civil Liberties Union started a petition to pressure OHSU to reconsider their decision and it seems to have worked. According to a press release from OHSU, the hospital has eliminated the the policy that was blocking Lesama-Santos from getting her liver transplant.

“It was brought to our attention this evening that an archaic transplant policy was preventing an undocumented individual from being evaluated at OHSU. Upon learning of the policy, OHSU leaders acted immediately and terminated the policy. We deeply regret the pain this has caused the family,” states the press release. “OHSU is committed to serving our entire community — all are welcome at OHSU, and this policy does not reflect our values.”

Officials at the Oregon hospital have issued states of apology to the family and the undocumented community that has been impacted by the policy. Some have expressed regret that the policy hadn’t been changed sooner.

“Being undocumented, per se, should not have stopped that and that was the policy that was changed,” Dr. Willscott Naugler, the medical director for the liver transplant program at OHSU, told The Oregonian. “I think we are with some egg on our face understanding that there was a confusion being undocumented and having no insurance.”

(H/T: The Oregonian)

READ: An Undocumented Man Was Denied A Lifesaving Heart Transplant Because Of His Status

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Latinas Are Opening Up About Their Experiences With Dealing With Postpartum Depression And It’s The Most Important Thing

Fierce

Latinas Are Opening Up About Their Experiences With Dealing With Postpartum Depression And It’s The Most Important Thing

When it comes to having a baby, there’s no doubt that parents will experience a wide range of emotions. From pride and joy to fear and excitement, having a baby, whether it’s for the first or the ninth time, will undoubtedly trigger all kinds of feelings you haven’t felt before. For many, giving birth can also produce a feeling that others would not anticipate: depression. 

According to the  Mayo Clinic, postpartum depression can occur not only in women but in new fathers as well and it is defined by mood swings, anxiety, sadness, crying and feelings of overwhelm. Many new parents will also experience irritability, reduced concentration, appetite problems and trouble sleeping. But the truth about postpartum depression is that it isn’t just unique to the feelings, in fact, the mood disorder can cause quite a bit of shame and isolation. After all, having a baby should be marked by a period of joy and happiness. But in reality, this isn’t always the case. Despite the fact that many expect new parents to be nothing but elated and a little bit starved for sleep around this time, in reality, PPD is not only very real but also perfectly normal to experience. In fact, according to Postpartum Depression Statistics, “approximately 70% to 80% of women will experience, at a minimum, the ‘baby blues’. Many of these women will experience the more severe condition of postpartum depression or a related condition.”

To get a better understanding of these feelings of depression and how Latinas deal with it in their own circumstances, FIERCE reached out to Latinas for their experiences in dealing with depression after they gave birth and how they learned to deal.

When it comes to PPD, you might feel too ashamed to reach out but there’s no one that will help you quite like your community.

Of course, like anyone dealing with depression, there is often a sense of shame tied to your sadness that will likely prevent you from reaching out at first. After all, when it comes to mental health (particularly in the Latino community) the world has a lot to learn and a lot of coming around to do.

“I am so so thankful for the conversations starting to happen! When I got diagnosed with PPD even though I had resources available to me like therapy and doctors it wasn’t until I found my community of other moms in similar situations that I felt not alone. Community is everything!” – twistedforsugar

Opening up to family can start the healing process.

No doubt about it, reaching out to your amigas, BFFs, and mommy groups will likely help you find the kind of support and love you need to climb the mountain of depression you might be experiencing. But it’s also important to remember that sometimes receiving comfort from your family can be way more helpful than you might have expected. After all, you know who else has likely either dealt with PPD or experienced it first hand for themselves long before you did? Your mama and your papa.

“I was the first to be open about my partum depression in my family. (Prior to that my family didn’t believe it existed). But, now we get to talk about it and it’s so healing!” – karlasturtz

Take a vacation and remember that even though your kids might see you as Wonder Woman, you’re also a real woman with real concerns that should be taken care of.

Yes, mama, you deserve as much attention and love as your newborn too. Don’t worry about reshaping your post-birth body right now. Jump into your favorite bathing suit, head off to your favorite ski sights and do you girl.

“Swear this made me cringe on how I did it twice and big freaken S/O to all those mommas that did it with 5+ kids!! Y’all need a damn holiday named after you wonder women!” – yes.its_still.me11

Just remember, yes you have a baby now so things are different, but you’re still deserving of love, light and a whole lot of patience and self- love.

You know how on flights, attendants always tell you to put your mask on first before you put on someone else’s? PPD kind of works that way too. Of course, you never want to neglect your little one but be sure to be kind to yourself just as you are to your newborn. 

“Yea i was definitely NOT prepared for my stomach to be big, and saggy for the first few months after” – thebitchyhippie559

Above all, get professional help.

Self-treatment is never really the most effective or safest way to go. If you think that you have postpartum depression, be sure to reach out to a support group. Postpartumdepression.org has a ton of resources for you here.

Latinas Are Wearing Rosita Shirts For Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Fierce

Latinas Are Wearing Rosita Shirts For Breast Cancer Awareness Month

I Wear Rosita For My Tía Charity Tee / wearemitu.com

It’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month and that means it’s time to show support to all the FIERCE mujeres out there who are breast cancer survivors or are fighting a battle against the disease. The arrival of October marks a month-long initiative helping put the spotlight firmly on women’s health and we want to do our part to help.

mitú partnered with Latinas Contra Cancer to create a collection of tees for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. 

FIERCE x Latinas Contra Cancer

Most of us dread going to the doctor for a mammogram and we push off getting the procedure done, no matter how important it is to our health. Of course, getting your boobs mashed into cold medical machines doesn’t sound like a good time, but it’s something you just have to do. 

Recent research has found that Latinas and women of color are at higher risk when it comes to breast cancer fatalities. And this is mostly due to a lack of outreach to Latinas for medical breast cancer research. The disease is hitting a lot of Latina groups, including Mexican, Cuban and Puerto Rican women. 

Represent the poderosa breast cancer survivor by shopping this tee while donating 20% of the proceeds to breast cancer research.

Latinas Contra Cancer is an organization that aims to “create an inclusive health care system that provides services to the underserved Latino population around issues of breast and other cancers.

In support of the cause, we’ve teamed up with Latinas Contra Cancer, an organization that is raising awareness about cancer in the Latino community, increasing access to quality care, working to decrease mortality and improving the quality of health care experience. ‘Latinas Contra Cancer’s mission is to “create an inclusive health care system that provides services to the underserved Latino population around issues of breast and other cancers.”

Shop for a cause: wear rosita to honor your guerrera, and 20% of the proceeds will go to Latinas Contra Cancer.

FIERCE x Latinas Contra Cancer

Wear our #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth tees to honor someone you love, whether it’s your tía, your sobrina, your hermana, or a friend, give a very special shout out to a strong lady who is battling this disease and help fund resources to help Latino communities of patients affected during and after their fight against cancer. 

Represent the poderosa breast cancer survivor by shopping this tee while donating 20% of the proceeds to breast cancer research.

Donations to ‘Latinas Contra Cancer’ makes it possible for them to provide cancer survivors with a personalized wig and breast prosthesis, free of charge.

credit instagram @latinascontracancer

The proceeds raised by your purchase will go to important programs like “Survivor Support”, where Latinas Contra Cancer host a monthly Spanish language survivor support group and other events to encourage self-care for survivors and caregivers in the community. Donations to LCC also help keep their ‘Wig & Breast Prothesis Boutique” running. In this unique space, the organization provides cancer survivors with a personalized shopping experience with caring staff and trained mastectomy fitters both in English and Spanish, at no cost.

mitú x Latinas Contra Cancer’s ‘Rosita’ collection is for our amigas, tías, madres or abuelas who are battling breast cancer are warriors and are breast cancer survivors or are battling breast cancer. 

FIERCE by mitú x Latinas Contra Cancer

Wear rosita for whoever you’re supporting; whether it’s your friend or your mom, the collection in partnership with Latinas Contra Cancer and mitú, features 6 different tees that you can wear to give a huge shout out to your hermanas, amigas, tías, madres, abuelas and primas, to show your admiration, respect, and most importantly your support of their battle against breast cancer. if pink isn’t your color, we got you, all styles are available in white and black and rosita.

Represent the poderosa breast cancer survivor by shopping this tee while donating 20% of the proceeds to breast cancer research.

Latinas are diagnosed at more advanced stages of breast cancer and are 20% more likely to die from the disease, so stop putting off that mammogram and get checked now.

Credit Instagram @schoolatmhp

While Latinas experience breast cancer at lower rates than most ethnic groups, they tend to be diagnosed at more advanced stages, making them 20 percent more likely than white women to die from the disease. According to Susan G. Komen, Latinas have a greater probability of discovering the disease at later stages, often when the tumors are larger and have spread, because they are less likely to schedule consistent mammogram exams and more likely to delay follow-ups after an abnormal test result, often due to low-income, a lack of health insurance and limited English proficiency.

It turns out Latinas are just not great at checking in with doctors in general. According to a census report, Latinos are the group least likely to take a trip to the doctor’s office. At the time of the census, 42% of Latinos had never attended their annual doctor’s appointment. 

Represent the poderosa breast cancer survivor by shopping this tee while donating 20% of the proceeds to breast cancer research.

Breast cancer happens to women of all ages. Don’t forget to check your chichis in routine self-breast examinations and visit your doctor if you feel anything abnormal.

credit Instagram @marnie_rustemeyer

While the general consensus is that the ideal age at which you should start going to the doctor for breast cancer screenings is forty, it’s important for women to remember that breast cancer in young women is also possible. Mammogram screenings are essential for detecting breast cancer in all women, whether they’re experiencing symptoms or not. And don’t forget to touch your chichis. Self-breast examinations have saved women of all ages, be sure to self examine your breasts routinely and go to the doctor if you spot anything abnormal.  About 80% of breast lumps are benign. Still, you can prevent a lot of the false alarms you would maybe experience otherwise by always checking in with your doctor.

Represent the poderosa breast cancer survivor by shopping this tee while donating 20% of the proceeds to breast cancer research.