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These Are Some Of The Most Notorious Crimes Committed In Latin America

The crime of the century is a phrase that gets used often when people see crimes that are truly unimaginable. Unfortunately, these crimes are a part of life and the Internet has made it possible for more people to see what people are capable of. While it’s true that we live in troubled times, there are some crimes that are just too gruesome or too bizarre to ever be forgotten. Here’s a list with the most notorious crimes in Latin America and their villainous protagonists.

The Angels of Death of Montevideo

Credit: Digital Image. Al Dia News. 2017

The self-proclaimed “Angels of Death” were none other than male nurses Marcelo Pereira Guzzo and Juan Acevedo Agriela that were employed at public hospitals in Uruguay’s capital city. Their actions were revealed by an undercover operation dubbed “Operation Angels” and they were eventually charged with 16 murders. The murderous duo claimed they were only guilty of ‘’mercy killing’’ and that they there carrying out euthanasia to terminally-ill patients that they couldn’t bare see suffer. Further investigations, however, proved otherwise.

They injected patients to watch them die.

Credit: The Angel of Death and the First Passover. Digital Image. Wikimedia Commons. 2010

Being hospital workers, the nurses had plenty of alone time with their victims, as well as access to a whole arsenal of murder weapons. Their modus operandi involved injecting excessive doses of morphine or just plain air bubbles into the victims’ veins. Investigators also claimed that the two nurses often texted each other to brag about their kills.

The Argentine Vampire’s Thirst for Blood in Monteros, Argentina

Credit: Digital Image. Contextotucuman.com 2018

Florencio Fernández terrorized the people of Monteros for quite a few years during the 1950s murdering young women in a horrible way. Fernández would sneak into houses through open windows on summer nights, beat his victims and then bite them in the throat to drink their blood. He was arrested in 1960 and was declared insane and sent to a psychiatric ward where he died a few years later.

The Vampire’s Lair

Credit: Edvard Munch – Vampire. Digital Image. Wikimedia Commons. 2013

Those who claimed that his insanity was just an act quickly changed their minds. After his arrest, authorities revealed that Fernández had been living in a cave. Psychiatric reports state that he was photophobic, probably schizophrenic and had developed a sexual attraction to blood.

Special Agent Kiki’s Brutal Murder in Guadalajara, Mexico

Credit: Kiki Camarena. Digital Image. Heavy.com 2018

Agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was on his way to meet with his wife when he was abducted in broad daylight by corrupt policemen in the employment of drug lord Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo. Kiki was a wanted man, as he was considered to be culpable for information that led to the destruction of a vast marijuana plantation. The agent was brutally tortured for 30 hours at Gallardo’s ranch and was even force-fed drugs to remain conscious throughout the process before finally succumbing on February 9, 1985.

The Red Ribbon Week Legacy

Credit: Kids walk for Red Ribbon Week. Digital Image. Wikimedia Commons. 2015

In honor of the special agent who sacrificed his life in the war against drugs, a campaign called Red Ribbon Week was initiated after his murder. The event gained international media attention for pushing for a drug-free society. Soon enough the campaign gathered momentum and is an annual event in the U.S.

The Apostle of Death in Lima, Peru

Credit: Pedro Pablo Nakada Ludeña. Digital Image. Alchetron.com 2018

Pedro Pablo Nakada Ludeña a.k.a the “Apostle of Death” claimed he went on a killing spree because was on a mission from God. Ludeña claimed that God demanded that he cleanse Lima’s streets of all the drug addicts, homeless people, prostitutes, and homosexuals. Before he was arrested in 2006, Ludeña had murdered at least 17 people with a handgun, including a 50-year-old lady who was smoking marijuana and a man who he thought might have been gay.

The Aftermath

Credit: Pedro Pablo Nakada Ludeña. Digital Image. Alchetron.com 2018

The “apostle’’ was eventually arrested in 2006 after an intense chase and shootout with local police. He was trialed and sentenced to 35 years in prison, where he still serves time in a psychiatric ward. Surprisingly enough, his brother was also convicted for murdering six people with a knife in Japan back in 2015.

El Chapo’s Reign in Sinaloa, Mexico

Credit: ABC News / YouTube

In 2009, Forbes included famous Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán in its list with the world’s most powerful people, with an estimated fortune of around $1 billion dollars. Indeed the suspected cartel leader is so powerful that Mexican officials believe that he is connected to no less than 70,000 deaths relating to the drug trade and underground economy.

Public Enemy Number 1

Credit: El Chapo in U.S. custody, 19 January 2017. Digital Image. Wikipedia. 2017

Among countless others, El Chapo is believed to be responsible for murdering four Jehovah’s witnesses, uploading executions on YouTube, and bribing officials. He is also accused of rigging beauty pageants for his wives to win and putting a bounty on presidents.

The bank heist of the century in Brazil.

Credit: BC. Digital Image. Jornalibia.com 2018

Back in 2005, employees of Banco Central in Fortaleza, Brazil started their week in the most unusual way. Soon after they opened up the bank, they found out that the vault, which was filled with old notes scheduled to be withdrawn from circulation, had been wiped clean over the weekend. The bank reported losses of 164 million Brazilian reals (about $90 million USD in current value) in what is considered to be the world’s most profitable heist.

The Elaborate Plan

Credit: Digital Image. Ozy.com 2015

This heist wasn’t just a spur-of-the-moment robbery. The burglars had long before rented a house next to the bank and pretended to do some renovating and gardening work to conceal the fact that they were actually digging a 330-feet underground tunnel leading to the bank’s vault. Even though there were several arrests in connection to this case and $9 million have been recovered, the police estimate that 18 of the culprits are still on the loose.

The Psychopath from Alto Hospicio, Chile

Credit: Julio Perez Silva. Digital Image. elsoldeiquique.cl 2016

When teenage girls started mysteriously disappearing from the small town of Alto Hospicio near Santiago in 1998, the authorities were too slow to mobilize. Many believe it was because the girls all came from poor families. That left Julio Silva free to roam the streets, kidnap, assault, and sexually abuse more than 15 girls before the police even knew he existed.

The Inevitable Downfall

Credit: Julio Perez Silva. Digital Image. Murderpedia.org

In 2001, a victim attempted to escape Silva who assaulted and abandoned her, mistakenly thinking she was dead. The young girl led the police directly to him and he was finally arrested. Silva confessed to murdering the girls and burying their bodies in a closeby mine shaft. He was sentenced to life in prison shortly after.

The Old Lady Killer of Mexico City

Credit: @JOSEMAR87 / Twitter

Juana Barraza a.k.a “La Mataviejitas” was a professional wrestler by day and a serial killer by night. As her nickname suggests, Barraza attacked and killed elderly women. Her mother was an alcoholic who reportedly sold her for three beers to a man that abused her as a child. Barraza took to killing older ladies later in life as a form of retaliation, believing she was greatly benefiting society.

Method to The Madness

Credit: @AztecaNoticias / Twitter

Barraza was very methodical when it came to approaching a new victim. She had access to a list of women who received financial assistance from the government and she pretended to be a social worker sent to check on their health. She would help the women bring groceries into their homes and attack when they were inside. She strangled her victims with strings or telephone cords. Authorities struggled to find her because of her physical build from wrestling, they believed they were looking for a man.

Crimes of the “Monster of the Andes”

Digital Image. 9news.com.au 2018

The life of Pedro López could easily compare to any gruesome Hollywood horror story. He was kicked out of his home after molesting his sister and was left on the streets. He traveled unceasingly throughout the continent, leaving a long trail of blood behind him. López is believed to have raped and murdered more than 300 young girls in Peru, Ecuador and Colombia alone.

A killer on the loose?

Digital Image. Brainjet.com

López was finally arrested in Ecuador after authorities discovered the bodies of four girls. He confessed to all his murders and was given 16 years in prison – the maximum time allowed by the country’s law at that time. His good behavior, however, means that he was released after 14 years in prison. He was then deported to Colombia where he spent four years in a psychiatric hospital before being diagnosed sane and making bail for $50. His whereabouts remain unknown to this day.

The Crime to End All Crimes in Brazil

Digital Image. Horrorstab.com 2018

Impossible as it may sound, this is probably the most bizarre entry on this list. Pedro Rodrigues Filho might be a serial killer, but he’s one of the more conscious ones. He might be responsible for about 70 murders, but the “Pedrinho Matador” chooses his victims carefully, as he targets other murderers, criminals, and wrongdoers.

A real-life “Dexter”

Digital Image. Fatosdesconhecidos.com.br 2018

Filho’s first victim was his hometown’s vice-mayor who had wrongfully fired his father. Soon enough, he murdered his father as well for beating his mother before he was born. His killing spree continued with the murders of drug dealers, gang members, and murderers. He was released from prison in 2007.


READ: Here’s The Story Of The Menendez Brothers Who Murdered Their Parents In Their Beverly Hills Home

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Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Culture

Peru’s Indigenous Are Turning To Ancestral Medicines To Fight The Coronavirus

Joao Laet / Getty Images

With news headlines like “How Covid-19 could destroy indigenous communities”, it’s hard to understate the affect that the Coronavirus has had on Indigenous communities across the world.

Even before the pandemic hit, native populations were already at increased risk of health complications, poor access to medical care, lack of proper education, and even premature death. The pandemic has only exacerbated these issues as government programs and NGOs who delivered aid to far flung communities have grind to a halt.

However, many communities have started taking the matter into their own hands by creating their own impromptu healthcare systems based on ancestral techniques and others have barricaded off their villages from the outside world in an effort to stem the flow of the virus.

In Peru, many Indigenous communities are turning to centuries-old medicines to fight back against the Coronavirus.

The Coronavirus has had a devastating impact on Peru – the country with the world’s highest per capita Covid-19 mortality rate. At particular risk is the nation’s large Indigenous community, who often lack proper access to education efforts and medical care. This has forced many Indigenous groups to find their own remedies.

In the Ucayali region, government rapid response teams deployed to a handful of Indigenous communities have found infection rates as high as 80% through antibody testing. Food and medicine donations have reached only a fraction of the population. Many say the only state presence they have seen is from a group responsible for collecting bodies of the dead.

At least one community, the Indigenous Shipibo from Peru’s Amazon region, have decided to rely on the wisdom of their ancestors. With hospitals far away, doctors stretch too thin and a lack of beds, many have accepted the alternative medicine.

In a report by the Associated Press, one villager, Mery Fasabi, speaks about gathering herbs, steeping them in boiling water and instructing her loved ones to breathe in the vapors. She also makes syrups of onion and ginger to help clear congested airways.

“We had knowledge about these plants, but we didn’t know if they’d really help treat COVID,” the teacher told the AP. “With the pandemic we are discovering new things.”

One of the plants the Shipibo are using is known locally as ‘matico.’ The plant has green leaves and brightly colored flowers. And although Fasabi admits that these ancestral remedies are by no means a cure, the holistic approach is proving successful. She says that “We are giving tranquility to our patients,” through words of encouragement and physical touch.

Even before the Coronavirus, Indigenous communities were at a greater risk for infectious diseases.

Indigenous peoples around the globe tend to be at higher risk from emerging infectious diseases compared to other populations. During the H1N1 pandemic in Canada in 2009, for example, aboriginal Canadians made up 16% of admissions to hospital, despite making up 3.4% of the population.

Covid-19 is no exception. In the US, one in every 2,300 indigenous Americans has died, compared to one in 3,600 white Americans.

Indigenous groups are particularly vulnerable to dying from Covid-19 because they often live days away from professional medical help. As of July 28, the disease had killed 1,108 indigenous people and there had been 27,517 recorded cases, with the majority in Brazil, according to data published by Red Eclesial Panamazonia (Repam).

Some communities are turning inward to survive COVID-19, barricading villages and growing their own food.

Despite the immense threat they face, Indigenous communities are fighting back.

“I am amazed to see the ways that indigenous peoples are stepping up to provide support where governments have not,” Tauli-Corpuz, a teacher at Mexico’s UNAM, told The Conversation. “They are providing PPE and sanitation, making their own masks, and ensuring that information on Covid-19 is available in local languages, and are distributing food and other necessities.”

They are also choosing to isolate. In Ecuador’s Siekopai nation, about 45 Indigenous elders, adults and children traveled deep into the forest to their ancestral heartland of Lagartococha to escape exposure to the Coronavirus, says the nation’s president Justino Piaguaje.

Despite their best efforts, many experts are extremely concerned for the survival of many Indigenous communities.

Credit: Ginebra Peña / Amazonian Alliance

They are already facing the ‘tipping point’ of ecological collapse due to increased threats of deforestation, fires, industrial extraction, agribusiness expansion and climate change,” Amazon Watch executive director Leila Salazar-Lopez told UNESCO of Amazonian Indigenous groups.

“Now, the pandemic has created one more crisis, and as each day passes, the risk of ethnocide becomes more real.”

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Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Culture

Viva Mexico Is Trending On Twitter Proving That Mexico Is More Than Just A Country

Carlos Vivas / Getty Images

It is Mexico’s Independence Day and that means that Mexicans around the world are honoring their roots. Twitter is buzzing with people who might not be in Mexico but they will forever have Mexico in their hearts. Here are just a few of the loving messages from people who are Mexican through and through.

Viva Mexico is trending on social media and the tweets are filled with love and passion for the country.

Mexico received its independence from Spain on September 16, 1810 and since then the day has been marked with celebration. The day is marked with parties of pride and culture no matter where you are in the world.

Mexicans everywhere are letting their Mexican flag fly.

Tbh, who doesn’t want to be Mexican to enjoy the day of puro pinche pride? The celebration for Mexican Independence Day starts on Sept. 15 with El Grito. The tradition is that the president of Mexico stands on the balcony on Sept. 15 at 11 p.m. and rings the same church bell that Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla rang in 1810 to trigger the Mexican Revolution.

People are loving all of the celebrations for their homeland.

The original El Grito took place in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato in 1810. While most El Grito celebrations take place at the National Palace, some presidents, especially on their last year, celebrate El Grito in the town where it originated.

Honestly, no one celebrates their independence day like Mexico and we love them for it.

¡Viva Mexico! Mexico lindo y querido. How are you celebrating the Mexican Independence Day this year? Show us what you have planned.

READ: Many Mexicans Are Calling Out Fragile Masculinity As Some Continue To Protest A Controversial Zapata Painting

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