Things That Matter

Out Of More Than Two Hundred NYC Students Handcuffed In 2016 Only Three Were Not Black Or Latino

fourbyfourblazer / Flickr

New information is out this week from the New York Civil Liberties Union, the city’s branch of the ACLU. They’re a group dedicated to protecting the civil liberties and the civil rights of New Yorkers. The report they released this week is an analysis of data recorded by the NYPD showing that police disproportionately handcuff Black and Latino students.

If this feels a little like “Um, duh, we’ve been saying this for years,” – well you’re not alone.

But first, the data.

The report goes on further to describe the actual numbers collected. They’re both shocking and unfortunately all too familiar:

“In 2016, there were 262 “child in crisis” incidents where handcuffs were used – and 99 percent of those incidents involved Black or Latino children.”

For those of us not doing the math, that’s 3 students out of 262 that were handcuffed who were not Black or Latino.

The NYCLU twitter account posted about their analysis.


The responses began immediately. Some were sarcastic.


Many were just angry.


And  some were just hurt.


There were those that thought the data was justified, however.


Tweets aside, the analysis of this data is extremely important, albeit obvious.

Recommend this story to a friend by clicking on the share button below.

More Than 200 Migrant Children Are Still Separated From Their Families Awaiting Asylum Requests

Things That Matter

More Than 200 Migrant Children Are Still Separated From Their Families Awaiting Asylum Requests

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

It’s been four months since a judge ordered the Trump administration to reunite separated families. However, 245 children are still in government custody, according to a report from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Parents of 175 of the children in detention have been deported. Deported parents of 125 the children have decided not to seek reunification in their countries of origin, according to KTLA. Instead, the parents are telling their children stay in the United States to pursue asylum on their own.

Four months ago the ACLU sued the federal government over the family separations of 2,654 children. Yet many still remain separated.

The ACLU lawsuit called for the immediate reunification of all separated migrant families under the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy. Though Trump signed an executive order ending his own policy after backlash, he has also implemented a new policy that detains entire families together.

“The Trump administration’s family separation policy was a failure of epic proportions. The courts and public clearly rejected it. The government should be putting all of its resources into reuniting kids who are still waiting — not going back to the drawing board to do further damage,” Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project said in a statement. “It is deeply disturbing that this administration continues to look for ways to cause harm to small children.”

A new government watchdog report shows that U.S. agencies were never told of or planned for the “zero tolerance” policy that separated families.

Homeland Security and Health and Human Services officials were unaware or not told in advance of the decision by Attorney General Jeff Sessions to implement the “zero tolerance” policy. The Government Accountability Office revealed these findings as news comes that President Trump has renewed his plans to stop the record number of migrant families entering the United States. He is considering launching a modified version of his family separation policy to deter migrants from crossing the border.

The report also shows that more than 2,654 children were separated from families between April and June 2018, when the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy was in full effect.

On average separated children have spent 154 days — about five months — in government custody.

The ACLU says that separated children were sent to 121 different detention or care centers in 17 states throughout the U.S. Sometimes they were sent hundreds or thousands of miles away from where their parents were being held. The largest chain of child detention centers are the Southwest Key facilities in Arizona, California, and Texas, where 1,091 (41 percent) of the children were detained. Many of the children (ages 5-17) were from South American countries with the biggest percentage coming from Guatemala at 55 percent and 33 percent from Honduras.

“The eventual reunification of these children and parents was, by all accounts, not a priority of those who designed and carried out the policy,” the ACLU wrote. “The ACLU has not undertaken an independent data investigation, and instead has had to rely on the numbers provided to us by the government. Thus, this data may well undercount the number of children who were separated or contain other gaps.”

The ACLU is set to begin its next set of hearings in front of a federal judge where this report will be a key part of the case.


READ: ICE Agents Returned An Undocumented Immigrant’s Wallet And Then Promptly Arrested Him

Share this story by tapping that share button below!

The Trump Administration Has Been Blocked From Removing Thousands Of Central American Immigrants

Things That Matter

The Trump Administration Has Been Blocked From Removing Thousands Of Central American Immigrants

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

A federal judge on Wednesday ordered the Trump administration to temporarily halt its plan to end the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program. The program allows thousands of immigrants to legally live and work in the U.S. for decades. The ruling, issued by U.S. District Judge Edward M. Chen, affects more than 300,000 immigrants enrolled in TPS from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan.  Judge Chen said the government failed to show harm of continuing TPS and the plaintiffs showed that removing those immigrants could hurt the local and national economy.

The ruling protecting TPS comes in response to a lawsuit by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

The ACLU lawsuit says that the effort to end TPS “was motivated by intentional race and national-origin-based animus against individuals from what President Trump has referred to as “shithole countries.” Judge Chen’s decision comes only a week after a hearing in the case. It will go into effect immediately and is positive news for TPS recipients, who were less than a month away from losing their protections. U.S. Judge Chen cited a brief filed by 17 states that they would lose billions on dollars in turnover costs if TPS recipients are sent home.

This is the latest defeat for the Trump administration as they try to overhaul the U.S. immigration system.

The ruling is the latest blow to the Trump administration’s efforts to change the nation’s immigration laws, following court orders limiting his travel ban targeting Muslim countries, his attempt to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and his policy of separating migrant families along the U.S. border.

“This shows that Trump’s move to terminate TPS was based on his racial motivations and not in any law or consideration of safety,” Working Families United, which supports temporary protected status, said in a statement to NBC News. “With the suit still in court, Congress must act to create a pathway to legal residency and make the protections permanent.”

For thousands of immigrants under TPS, the ruling brings pause of fear after months of uncertainty.

For the lead plaintiff in the case, 14-year-old Christa Ramos (whose parents are from El Salvador), it means that she and her family can begin to live their lives again without fears of deportation.

“Ever since the TPS terminations were announced, I have been wondering how I can live a normal life if I am about to lose my mom,” Ramos said in a statement. “Today, my family and I are celebrating.”

The legal battle for TPS recipients is far from over as this is only a temporary fix.

There are still more legal battles for TPS recipients in the coming weeks as the case may make its way to the higher courts. It doesn’t force the administration to formally renew TPS, much less grant any more permanent legal status.


READ: Federal Judge Lets DACA Program Live Citing Harm If Program Is Canceled

Recommend this story to a friend by clicking on the share button below.

Paid Promoted Stories