Things That Matter

Out Of More Than Two Hundred NYC Students Handcuffed In 2016 Only Three Were Not Black Or Latino

New information is out this week from the New York Civil Liberties Union, the city’s branch of the ACLU. They’re a group dedicated to protecting the civil liberties and the civil rights of New Yorkers. The report they released this week is an analysis of data recorded by the NYPD showing that police disproportionately handcuff Black and Latino students.

If this feels a little like “Um, duh, we’ve been saying this for years,” – well you’re not alone.

But first, the data.

The report goes on further to describe the actual numbers collected. They’re both shocking and unfortunately all too familiar:

“In 2016, there were 262 “child in crisis” incidents where handcuffs were used – and 99 percent of those incidents involved Black or Latino children.”

For those of us not doing the math, that’s 3 students out of 262 that were handcuffed who were not Black or Latino.

The NYCLU twitter account posted about their analysis.


The responses began immediately. Some were sarcastic.


Many were just angry.


And  some were just hurt.


There were those that thought the data was justified, however.


Tweets aside, the analysis of this data is extremely important, albeit obvious.

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She Gave Birth While Still Wearing Her Jeans Because Border Patrol Agents Ignored Her Pleas For Help

Things That Matter

She Gave Birth While Still Wearing Her Jeans Because Border Patrol Agents Ignored Her Pleas For Help

Sherry Munoz / Getty

Unfortunately, there have been no shortage of stories detailing the cruelty experienced by migrants at the hands of Border Patrol officers. But this one in particular has struck a chord with people.

In February, U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced that it had safely helped an asylum-seeker give birth while in custody. But the woman herself has now come forward and thrown that narrative into doubt.

Border Patrol agents in California are now under investigation for alleged abusive treatment of a pregnant woman in their custody.

The complaint filed Wednesday details how a Guatemalan woman gave birth at the Chula Vista Border Patrol station near San Diego, standing up, holding onto a trash can while still wearing her pants. She had pleaded with Border Patrol agents for help, but they reportedly told her to sit down and wait to be processed.

She had been detained with her husband and two young daughters in February as they hoped to apply for asylum in the U.S.

The mother, who delivered her baby while still wearing her pants, asked agents for help repeatedly and mentioned she was in pain.

They were in the midst of being processed by agents when after about 30 minutes, her husband could hear the baby crying through the fabric of her pants.

According to the complaint, which was filed by the ACLU and Jewish Family Service of San Diego, the woman, whom lawyers call Anna, gave birth while wearing her pants, and holding onto a garbage can, even after she complained of womb pain on the trip to the Border Patrol station. 

The complaint states that her husband, who was arrested along with their two other children while crossing the border, helped pull down her pants to reveal his partially-born daughter. The baby was then birthed in the cell, in full sight of other detainees and Border Patrol employees.

The woman and her newborn were later taken to Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center where they were discharged and returned to the station for the night, during which the newborn was not given a sufficient blanket, the complaint claims, adding that Ana was only allowed to shower when she was released to the Jewish Family Service Migrant Family Shelter three days after giving birth.

Yup – Border Patrol agents let a woman endure a painful labor and risked the life of a baby by ignoring her request for help.

Later, at a family shelter run by Jewish Family Service of San Diego, the new mother was interviewed about her alleged mistreatment. After hearing her story, the shelter contacted the American Civil Liberties Union and together, both agencies filed the complaint on the mother’s behalf.

The family is now safe and healthy and reunited with family members in another part of the US, Kate Clark, senior director of immigration services at Jewish Family Service of San Diego, told BuzzFeed News on Tuesday.

Originally, the Border Patrol had released a statement praising their officers for helping a woman deliver a baby – that now looks like it wasn’t entirely true.

The Border Patrol, in a statement published Feb. 19, said the woman “did not appear to be in distress and did not request any medical attention” when she was first apprehended. It went on to say that staff “prepared an area for the mother to give birth” at the Chula Vista station.

Alongside the complaint filed by the ACLU, Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal is writing a letter to Department of Homeland Security Inspector General Joseph Cuffari also demanding an investigation.

The letter is signed by 12 other members of Congress, including Sens. Kamala Harris, Cory Booker, and Amy Klobuchar, and it seconds the ACLU’s demand for an investigation into the woman’s specific incident, as well as several similar instances of the mistreatment of pregnant people in immigration custody, and an overhaul of DHS policies on the detainment of pregnant people.

More Than 200 Migrant Children Are Still Separated From Their Families Awaiting Asylum Requests

Things That Matter

More Than 200 Migrant Children Are Still Separated From Their Families Awaiting Asylum Requests

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

It’s been four months since a judge ordered the Trump administration to reunite separated families. However, 245 children are still in government custody, according to a report from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Parents of 175 of the children in detention have been deported. Deported parents of 125 the children have decided not to seek reunification in their countries of origin, according to KTLA. Instead, the parents are telling their children stay in the United States to pursue asylum on their own.

Four months ago the ACLU sued the federal government over the family separations of 2,654 children. Yet many still remain separated.

The ACLU lawsuit called for the immediate reunification of all separated migrant families under the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy. Though Trump signed an executive order ending his own policy after backlash, he has also implemented a new policy that detains entire families together.

“The Trump administration’s family separation policy was a failure of epic proportions. The courts and public clearly rejected it. The government should be putting all of its resources into reuniting kids who are still waiting — not going back to the drawing board to do further damage,” Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project said in a statement. “It is deeply disturbing that this administration continues to look for ways to cause harm to small children.”

A new government watchdog report shows that U.S. agencies were never told of or planned for the “zero tolerance” policy that separated families.

Homeland Security and Health and Human Services officials were unaware or not told in advance of the decision by Attorney General Jeff Sessions to implement the “zero tolerance” policy. The Government Accountability Office revealed these findings as news comes that President Trump has renewed his plans to stop the record number of migrant families entering the United States. He is considering launching a modified version of his family separation policy to deter migrants from crossing the border.

The report also shows that more than 2,654 children were separated from families between April and June 2018, when the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy was in full effect.

On average separated children have spent 154 days — about five months — in government custody.

The ACLU says that separated children were sent to 121 different detention or care centers in 17 states throughout the U.S. Sometimes they were sent hundreds or thousands of miles away from where their parents were being held. The largest chain of child detention centers are the Southwest Key facilities in Arizona, California, and Texas, where 1,091 (41 percent) of the children were detained. Many of the children (ages 5-17) were from South American countries with the biggest percentage coming from Guatemala at 55 percent and 33 percent from Honduras.

“The eventual reunification of these children and parents was, by all accounts, not a priority of those who designed and carried out the policy,” the ACLU wrote. “The ACLU has not undertaken an independent data investigation, and instead has had to rely on the numbers provided to us by the government. Thus, this data may well undercount the number of children who were separated or contain other gaps.”

The ACLU is set to begin its next set of hearings in front of a federal judge where this report will be a key part of the case.

READ: ICE Agents Returned An Undocumented Immigrant’s Wallet And Then Promptly Arrested Him

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