Things That Matter

Here Are 13 Moments Of People Attacking Latinos That Set Social Media On Fire

It’s been a rough year for our community as white supremacists and nationalist have felt empowered to express their hate. Inflammatory rhetoric from politicians on the national level has empowered these groups in their racist attacks.

According to Hate Crime in California’s new study, hate crimes against all minorities in California have increased by 17 percent since President Trump’s 2016 campaign. For Latinos, specifically, there has been a 51.8 percent increase in hate crimes since Trump won the presidency.

When a group of people attacked a 92 year old abuelito with a concrete brick.

@jimmurphySF / Twitter

Rodolfo Rodriguez was visiting his family in Los Angeles from Mexico when he decided to go for a walk. He went to pass a mother with her child on the sidewalk, and the mother shoved him to the ground and started beating him in the face with a concrete brick. Several men joined in yelling over and over again to “go back to Mexico.”

This California woman started yelling at a Latino Man, calling him a ‘rapist and animal.’

@KenidraRWoods_ / Twitter

Sound familiar? Esteban Guzman was just trying to do his landscaping work when a racist woman started abusing him.

“Why do you hate us?”

“Because you’re Mexicans.”

“We are honest people right here!”

“Haha..yeah.. rapists & animals.”

The fact that we have to defend ourselves from ese basura is enraging. This is why we’re angry, Trump’s America.

Remember the guy who harassed this woman for 30 minutes for wearing a Puerto Rico shirt?

Mia Irizarry / Facebook

Well, two felony hate crimes have been filed against him. Mia Irizarry was just trying to celebrate her 24th birthday at a pavilion she rented out in Chicago. This man kept asking her if she was a citizen and telling her that she shouldn’t be wearing her shirt.

“You’re not going to change us,” the man said. “The world is not going to change the United States of America. You should not be wearing that in the United States of America.”

The police officer who just ignored Irizarry as she asked for help ultimately resigned.

m.i.a.paperplanes / Facebook

The guy kept getting into Izarry’s personal space and she pleaded with the police officer to step in. He only stepped in when the attacker started asking for assistance once Izarry’s brother stepped into the picture.

The officer, Patrick Connor, resigned from his post after severe backlash from the video.

This lawn mowing company made some of the most racist business cards we’ve seen.

@RaxTillerson / Twitter

The company decided to go with a business strategy of being “American-Owned” to get an edge over Latino owned landscaping businesses. The card itself reads “Your alternative to Illegal Lawn Services” and “Taking back Carrollton–One lawn at a time.” ????

The business claims to be getting death threats and issues new cards–that effectively remove the “American Owned” bit and replaced it with “God Bless America.”

Not all racists are old and uneducated. This white lawyer threatened to call Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on Spanish-speaking restaurant workers.

Edward Suazo / Facebook

He started yelling at employees at Fresh Kitchen in Manhattan after hearing them speak Spanish with customers. “Your staff is speaking Spanish to customers when they should be speaking English,” he berated one employee in the video. “This is America.”

People started laughing at him which caused him to threaten to call ICE. So what happened? Twitter identified the man, his law office and its renter. The company that leased the office terminated its agreement with the lawyer.

This pedestrian threw an elote street cart over.

March and Rally Los Angeles / Facebook

The guy is from Argentina. Still, he got so upset he didn’t have the full sidewalk he felt entitled to that he threw Benjamin Ramirez’s cart over. Ramirez stood his ground and refused to move his cart, telling him there was plenty of room for him to pass. When Ramirez calls him racist, he said, “I’m not racist, I’m from Argentina.”

Ramirez has been a street vendor since 2000 and has never experienced anything like it. They called the police but because the Argentinian could speak English, he just told the police that it was Ramirez’ fault.

This woman attacked a Latina mother for speaking Spanish in an IHOP.

Carlos Steven Vasquez / Facebook

People really have a problem with us speaking Spanish, huh? Norma Vasquez got so pissed and I was here for it. She started yelling back that she does speak English. She responded with:

“Do you want the Russians over here telling you what to do?”

“You want the Nazis telling you what do? We want English in the United States. We don’t want the Nazis back. We don’t want the fascists back. We don’t want Castro back,” she exclaims.

This white lady straight up threw hot coffee on a Latino worker.

Miguel Sanchez / Facebook

A Latino contractor caught this fitness trainer yelling at Miguel Sanchez, who was in charge of her apartment building’s construction. She was calling him and his partner “wetbacks” and that they were here to steal their stuff. When Sanchez showed her that he has a garage clicker and keys to the apartment building, she threw her hot coffee on him.

She then went on to threaten his family on Facebook.

Worse than these daily aggressions are the widespread policies that directly hurt Latinxs.

@LupeValdez / Twitter

Undocumented immigrants are too afraid to report domestic abuse out of fear of being deported thanks to Texas’ new tough laws on immigration enforcement. While the Latino population grows, there was a 16 percent drop in domestic violence reports in Houston. They have good reason to be afraid.

After a transgender woman living in El Paso reported her partner to the police for domestic abuse, ICE detained her for being undocumented.

Trump tried to end Temporary Protected Status (TPS).

@MiamiHerald / Twitter

A federal judge blocked the policy saying that the government failed to show harm of continuing TPS, which allows 300,000 immigrants from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan to live and work in the U.S. To do so would cost the economy billions of dollars since, you know, immigrants. We get the job done.

While policy ruins lives, personal aggressions slowly decay at Latinxs as well.

Brian vander Brug / Los Angeles Times

This Los Angeles Times reporter shared her experience in an Op-Ed of how she was yelled at by a “pink fingernails, dark blond hair” woman who demanded she “Speak English.” Esmeralda Bermudez left El Salvador when she was 7 years old during the civil war. She and her Armenian husband are raising their child to be fluent in three languages.

This white lady tried to open a “modern frutería” in Barrio Logan and failed.

La Gracia / Kickstarter

Guys, the video is too cringe-worthy to even share. This woman, Jenny Niezgoda, started a Kickstarter to raise funds for “La Gracia.” One activist said, “For someone to come in thinking they’re going to save something they’re not part of is offensive. The way she’s representing her business, I feel colonized once again.”

Just a few weeks ago, students at Duke University celebrated Latinx Heritage Month with this mural.

Mi Gente / Facebook

The month is meant to give honor and recognition to all the Latinx accomplishments in the U.S. thus far. Mi Gente is Duke University’s official Latinx student organization. Every year they come together for “Pintado Murales,” an artistic legacy of Latinx icons.

Within 24 hours, the mural was defaced.

Mi Gente / Facebook

But of course, this is 2018 and being proud of your Latinidad is somehow a direct threat to white people. Thanks, Trump. The co-president of Mi Gente, Sujeiry Jimenez, said:

“I felt devastated but not completely shocked. Incidents like this had happened at Duke not long before this. Before classes even started this year, the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture was also the target of an act of hate speech.”

The students clapped back in the most poetic way possible.

Mi Gente / Facebook

“As a both a leader and member of the Latinx community it was very powerful to see the response not only from our own community but from the larger Duke community,” Jimenez recalls. “We, as a community decided to write over the spray paint, but not with the intention of covering it up. We wanted to send a message of resilience and show that we could rise about the hate. Then, we recreated our mural to the side of where the original one was.”

But the worst may be yet to come.

@samanthaarlene / Twitter

With Halloween right around the corner, we’re all revving up for the inevitable sombrero wearing jocks and now, this trashy Selena costume that offers zero reverence to the one and only Selena Quintanilla.


READ: Lawn Mowing Company Issued Racist Business Cards, Now Claims They’re Getting Death Threats

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Exclusive: Luis Fonsi Talks Working with Rauw Alejandro, Christina Aguilera, and Demi Lovato

Entertainment

Exclusive: Luis Fonsi Talks Working with Rauw Alejandro, Christina Aguilera, and Demi Lovato

Luis Fonsi is kicking off 2021 with a new single. The Puerto Rican superstar premiered the music video for “Vacío” on Feb. 18 featuring rising Boricua singer Rauw Alejandro. The guys put a new spin on the classic “A Puro Dolor” by Son By Four.

Luis Fonsi throws it back to his románticas.

“I called Omar Alfanno, the writer of ‘A Puro Dolo,’ who is a dear friend,” Fonsi tells Latido Music. “I told him what my idea was [with ‘Vacío’] and he loved it. He gave me his blessing, so I wrote a new song around a few of those lines from ‘A Puro Dolor’ to bring back that nostalgia of those old romantic tunes that have been a part of my career as well. It’s a fresh production. It sounds like today, but it has that DNA of a true, old-school ballad.”

The world got to know Fonsi through his global smash hit “Despacito” with Daddy Yankee in 2017. The remix with Canadian pop star Justin Bieber took the song to new heights. That was a big moment in Fonsi’s music career that spans over 20 years.

There’s more to Fonsi than “Despacito.”

Fonsi released his first album, the fittingly-titled Comenzaré, in 1998. While he was on the come-up, he got the opportunity of a lifetime to feature on Christina Aguilera’s debut Latin album Mi Reflejo in 2000. The two collaborated on “Si No Te Hubiera Conocido.” Fonsi scored multiple Billboard Hot Latin Songs No. 1s in the years that followed and one of the biggest hits was “No Me Doy Por Vencido” in 2008. That was his career-defining romantic ballad.

“Despacito” remains the second most-viewed music video on YouTube with over 7.2 billion views. The hits did not stop there. Later in 2017, he teamed up with Demi Lovato for “Échame La Culpa,” which sits impressively with over 2 billion views.

He’s also appearing on The Voice next month.

Not only is Fonsi working on his new album, but also he’s giving advice to music hopefuls for the new season of The Voice that’s premiering on March 1. Kelly Clarkson tapped him as her Battle Advisor. In an exclusive interview, Fonsi talked with us about “Vacío,” The Voice, and a few of his greatest hits.

What was the experience like to work with Rauw Alejandro for “Vacío”?

Rauw is cool. He’s got that fresh sound. Great artist. Very talented. Amazing onstage. He’s got that great tone and delivery. I thought he had the perfect voice to fit with my voice in this song. We had talked about working together for awhile and I thought that this was the perfect song. He really is such a star. What he’s done in the last couple of years has been amazing. I love what he brought to the table on this song.

Now I want to go through some of your greatest hits. Do you remember working with Christina Aguilera for her Spanish album?

How could you not remember working with her? She’s amazing. That was awhile back. That was like 1999 or something like that. We were both starting out and she was putting out her first Spanish album. I got to sing a beautiful ballad called “Si No Te Hubiera Conocido.” I got to work with her in the studio and see her sing in front of the mic, which was awesome. She’s great. One of the best voices out there still to this day.

What’s one of your favorite memories of “No Me Doy Por Vencido”?

“No Me Doy Por Vencido” is one of the biggest songs in my career. I think it’s tough to narrow it down just to one memory. I think in general the message of the song is what sticks with me. The song started out as a love song, but it turned into an anthem of hope. We’ve used the song for different important events and campaigns. To me, that song has such a powerful message. It’s bigger than just a love song. It’s bringing hope to people. It’s about not giving up. To be able to kind of give [people] hope through a song is a lot more powerful than I would’ve ever imagined. It’s a very special song.

I feel the message is very relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic we’re living through.

Oh yeah! I wrote that song a long time ago with Claudia Brant, and during the first or second month of the lockdown when we were all stuck at home, we did a virtual writing session and we rewrote “No Me Doy Por Vencido.” Changing the lyrics, kind of adjusting them to this situation that we’re living now. I haven’t recorded it. I’ll do something with it eventually. It’s really cool. It still talks about love. It talks about reuniting. Like the light at the end of the tunnel. It has the hope and love backbone, but it has to do a lot with what we’re going through now.

What do you think of the impact “Despacito” made on the industry?

It’s a blessing to be a part of something so big. Again, it’s just another song. We write these songs and the moment you write them, you don’t really know what’s going to happen with them. Or sometimes you run into these surprises like “Despacito” where it becomes a global phenomenon. It goes No. 1 in places where Spanish songs had never been played. I’m proud. I’m blessed. I’m grateful to have worked with amazing people like Daddy Yankee. Like Justin Bieber for the remix and everyone else involved in the song. My co-writer Erika Ender. The producers Mauricio Rengifo and Andrés Torres. It was really a team effort and it’s a song that obviously changed my career forever.

What was the experience like to work with Demi Lovato on “Echáme La Culpa”?

She’s awesome! One of the coolest recording sessions I’ve ever been a part of. She really wanted to sing in Spanish and she was so excited. We did the song in Spanish and English, but it was like she was more excited about the Spanish version. And she nailed it! She nailed it from the beginning. There was really not much for me to say to her. I probably corrected her once or twice in the pronunciation, but she came prepared and she brought it. She’s an amazing, amazing, amazing vocalist.

You’re going to be a battle advisor on The Voice. What was the experience like to work with Kelly Clarkson?

She’s awesome. What you see is what you get. She’s honest. She’s funny. She’s talented. She’s humble and she’s been very supportive of my career. She invited me to her show and it speaks a lot that she wanted me to be a part of her team as a Battle Advisor for the new season. She supports Latin music and I’m grateful for that. She’s everything you hope she would be. She’s the real deal, a true star, and just one of the coolest people on this planet.

What can we expect from you in 2021?

A lot of new music. Obviously, everything starts today with “Vacío.” This is literally the beginning of what this new album will be. I’ve done nothing but write and record during the last 10 months, so I have a bunch of songs. Great collaborations coming up. I really think the album will be out probably [in the] third or fourth quarter this year. The songs are there and I’m really eager for everybody to hear them.

Read: We Finally Have A Spanish-Language Song As The Most Streamed Song Of All Time

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Lifestyles Of The Rich And Dangerous: Cartels Are Using TikTok To Lure Young People

Things That Matter

Lifestyles Of The Rich And Dangerous: Cartels Are Using TikTok To Lure Young People

If you’ve ever wondered what someone with a bulletproof vest and an AR-15 would look like flossing — the dance, not the method of dental hygiene — apparently the answer to that question can be found on TikTok.

Unfortunately, it’s not as a part of some absurdist sketch comedy or surreal video art installation. Instead, it’s part of a growing trend of drug cartels in Mexico using TikTok as a marketing tool. Nevermind the fact that Mexico broke grim records last year for the number of homicides and cartel violence, the cartels have found an audience on TikTok and that’s a serious cause for concern.

Mexican cartels are using TikTok to gain power and new recruits.

Just a couple of months ago, a TikTok video showing a legit high-speed chase between police and drug traffickers went viral. Although it looked like a scene from Netflix’s Narcos series, this was a very real chase in the drug cartel wars and it was viewed by more than a million people.

Typing #CartelTikTok in the social media search bar brings up thousands of videos, most of them from people promoting a “cartel culture” – videos with narcocorridos, and presumed members bragging about money, fancy cars and a luxury lifestyle.

Viewers no longer see bodies hanging from bridges, disembodied heads on display, or highly produced videos with messages to their enemies. At least not on TikTok. The platform is being used mainly to promote a lifestyle and to generate a picture of luxury and glamour, to show the ‘benefits’ of joining the criminal activities.

According to security officials, the promotion of these videos is to entice young men who might be interested in joining the cartel with images of endless cash, parties, military-grade weapons and exotic pets like tiger cubs.

Cartels have long used social media to shock and intimidate their enemies.

And using social media to promote themselves has long been an effective strategy. But with Mexico yet again shattering murder records, experts on organized crime say Cartel TikTok is just the latest propaganda campaign designed to mask the blood bath and use the promise of infinite wealth to attract expendable young recruits.

“It’s narco-marketing,” said Alejandra León Olvera, an anthropologist at Spain’s University of Murcia, in a statement to the New York Times. The cartels “use these kinds of platforms for publicity, but of course it’s hedonistic publicity.”

Mexico used to be ground zero for this kind of activity, where researchers created a new discipline out of studying these narco posts. Now, gangs in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, and the United States are also involved.

A search of the #CartelTikTok community and its related accounts shows people are responding. Public comments from users such as “Y’all hiring?” “Yall let gringos join?” “I need an application,” or “can I be a mule? My kids need Christmas presents,” are on some of the videos.

One of the accounts related to this cartel community publicly answered: “Of course, hay trabajo para todos,” “I’ll send the application ASAP.” “How much is the pound in your city?” “Follow me on Instagram to talk.” The post, showing two men with $100 bills and alcohol, had more than a hundred comments.

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