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What You Need To Know About The Migrant Caravan That Is Heading Towards The US-Mexico Border

John Moore / Getty

For the past two weeks, thousands of Central American migrants have been marching through southern Mexico in the hope of reaching the United States. The total number of migrants now headed to the U.S. border is reported to have grown close to 7,200. The caravan, mostly Hondurans and Guatemalans, intends to seek asylum at the U.S. border after leaving their homes due to poor living conditions and fears of violence.

Over the past decade, there has been a rise in the number of people crossing the US border fleeing violence from  Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.

Under current US and international law, those who seek asylum from Central America are allowed to apply in either in Mexico or in the U.S. The U.S. has asked Mexico to apprehend Central American migrants before they get to the border to help ease the backlog of migrants applying for asylum. The tactic of migrants traveling as a caravan is used for hypervisibility when traveling. For some, it’s a way to call attention to what they’re fleeing and what migrants have to go through and to some, it’s simply an opportunity for a better life.

Where did this caravan start and who organized it?

On October 12, about 160 Hondurans began their journey in hopes of arriving in Mexico or the U.S. to apply for asylum. Two days later, the caravan was more than 1,000 people, according to the Associated Press. While no person has taken credit for organizing the growing caravan, news outlets have reported that representatives from Pueblo Sin Fronteras, an immigrants rights group, have been quoted as the presumed leaders of the caravan. The group organized a similar, smaller caravan back in April. The caravan has already passed through Guatemala and is now passing through southern Mexico.

This has been of the most recognizable images of the migrant caravan as they crossed the Mexico-Guatemalan border last Friday.

Members of the migrant caravan broke through a Guatemalan border fence last Friday and rushed onto the bridge over the Suchiate River. Men and women, some with children and babies, began storming and climbing the barrier eventually tearing it down. The caravan was met by a wall of police on the Mexican side of the bridge. Police and immigration agents began letting groups of 10, 20 or 30 people through the gates if they wanted to apply for refugee status.

President Trump put blame on the Mexican government as police have been watching the caravan since crowds breached the fence and pushed past patrol agents.

President Trump has politicized the migrant caravan and has used it as a talking point as the midterm election approaches.

While caravans like this have been happening for years, President Trump has capitalized on the moment as midterms are less then two weeks away. He has taken to Twitter to criticize the governments of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras for failing to deal with the caravan and even threatening to reduce U.S. aid to these countries. He has put the blame on Democrats for the immigrant caravan and has used it as a talking point at many of his rallies to spike interest in his base.

“Every time you see a Caravan, or people illegally coming, or attempting to come, into our Country illegally, think of and blame the Democrats,” President Trump said on Twitter.

Will the caravan make it to the U.S. border and what will happen if they do?

While many migrants in the caravan are hoping to make it to the U.S.-Mexico border some will elect to stay in Mexico (as of Monday, Mexican authorities had already received 1,000 requests for asylum from members of the caravan). The Mexican government has said that it won’t give out travel visas to members of the caravan and that people who don’t seek asylum in Mexico will be up for deportation.

If and when members of the migrant caravan make it to the U.S.-Mexico border, they will most likely seek asylum in the U.S. without papers. They are legally allowed to present themselves at the border seeking asylum but since there is a huge backlog of asylum seekers the process may take weeks.

These caravans are not set up for political purposes but as an act of a persons last hope to survive. As long as violence in Central America continues, these migrant caravans won’t be stopping anytime soon.


READ: The Trump Administration Has Been Blocked From Removing Thousands Of Central American Immigrants

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A Group Of Angry Tias And Abuelas Is Doing What The Government Cannot: Helping Undocumented People

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A Group Of Angry Tias And Abuelas Is Doing What The Government Cannot: Helping Undocumented People

Angry Tias And Abuelas / Facebook

All over the country groups and nonprofits are taking it upon themselves to deal with the immigration crisis in a humane way. They are doing what the government cannot: provide help to thousands of undocumented migrants looking for refuge. However, helping people isn’t as easy as one may think. Dr. Scott Warren was just on trial this week for giving undocumented migrants water and food. Thankfully the trial ended in a hung jury, but that goes to show that in this country, people do risk prosecution for giving people the dignity they deserve. That is why the story of these women warms our heart.

A group of women received the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award for their advocacy of undocumented people.

Facebook/angrytiasandabuelas

The women, who call their organization the Angry Tias and Abuelas, got honored last week for helping undocumented people transition from the moment that government officials release them from detention.

Here’s their mission: To advocate for dignity and justice for individuals and families seeking asylum at our borders. As they embark on their journeys to destinations across the U.S., our aim is to assure their basic health and safety needs are met. We provide emergency assistance such as food, water, clothing, toiletries, logistical support, and cash funds when needed to those recently released from ICE custody at bus depots or shelters in Brownsville and McAllen. We inform asylum seekers of their rights as they await entry across international bridges and give direct financial support to refugee shelters in the RGV and select immigrant shelters in Matamoros and Reynosa.

While the group said the award means everything to them, they are more frustrated with how the government is treating people at the border.

“Yes, we are mad,” she told NBC News. “We’re mad at the brutality of the United States government against the same people who are the same background as our own. These are families seeking safety from repression exactly like our own forefathers.”

The group launched just last year after seeing groups of women and children sleeping outside in torturous heat.

“It was quite a shocking scene,” Joyce Hamilton told CBS News about their first encounter with undocumented people. She said that her friends gathered to do something about it and help any way they could.

“We started talking to each other and meeting, and then enough of us were seeing each other enough times that some of us met for coffee at my house just to talk about coordinating a little bit and we formed the Angry Tias, thinking it would last for a few months,” Jennifer Harbury also said to CBS News. But the issue has not been resolved, and so they’ve continued to work.

Click here if you’d like more information on how you can help the Angry Tias and Abuelas group.

READ: Trial Begins For Scott Warren, The Volunteer Arrested For Giving Undocumented People Water, Saving Lives

This Man Graduated From College At 58 Years Old After Working As A Farmworker Who Immigrated From Mexico

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This Man Graduated From College At 58 Years Old After Working As A Farmworker Who Immigrated From Mexico

csumb / Instagram

During this graduation season, we love to hear about first-time college graduates, especially from those who are children of immigrants. It’s so inspiring to read how so many of these people worked hard to make their parents proud, especially because they worked even harder to give their children a better life. In very few cases, it’s not just their children who are graduating but the parents themselves.

Fifty-eight-year-old Adolfo González, a farmworker who used to pick celery, earned his bachelor’s degree from the California State University, Monterey Bay.

Twitter/@ThinkMexican

González, an indigenous immigrant from Mexico, worked in agriculture for years in Salinas Valley, California but always dreamed about going back to school. According to The Californian, González went back to nigh school to learn English. But even while continuing his studies, he never forgot his roots.

“I think it’s very important to learn our indigenous language because it’s part of our culture,” he told the publication. “It’s part of our identity.”

González graduated early and with honors a year after his daughter got her college degree as well.

Twitter/@TUSK81

“The most important thing for me is not what I’m doing now,” he told the publication. “The most important thing to me is to inspire people to do the same thing I did, because, como dijo Cesar Chavez, ‘Si se puede.'”

His journey and story to get to that stage are inspiring everyone who is reading about him on social media.

The “Si Se Puede” motto can take us all the way to the top. Not only does it inspire us to reach for the best that we can be, it also reminds us of how far we’ve come.

His story is proof that determination is the most important part of anyone’s journey.

“I took the decision to come to the United States like everybody does, because it’s the only way we can support our family,” he said. “I always promised to my mom ‘I will buy you a house,’ and I did it.”

He pursued an education so that he could continue to help his community.

Who wouldn’t want someone this passionate as their teacher? He is going to change the lives and thoughts of so many people. He is the kind of people we need to become educators to spark that love of education in others.

Big congratulations to Adolfo and his unending determination to become the best version of himself that he could be.

He will be like another Mr. Escalante. At least we can all hope that he will be the next big teacher to change lives one class at a time.

Congratulations, Adolfo González.

Share your touching graduation stories with us on social media using #MituGraduate.

READ: She Dropped Out Of High School When She Got Pregnant And Her Farm Working Parents Gave Her All The Advice She Needed To Get A Master’s

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