Things That Matter

This Miami Artist Is Using His Skills For Both Muralism And Art Education In Latin America

Fine artist, animator and fashion designer Marlon Preuss, a.k.a. Marlon Pruz, is leaving his mark (or brushstroke) on his hometown of Miami and abroad in Latin America. The 24-year-old artist has learned how to fuse his multiple art styles and interests into life-sized artwork for music studios, clubs and schools. He is also taking his murals to schools and impoverished neighborhoods in Latin America to inspire art education.

Meet muralist Marlon Preuss.

Fell in love with my chrome plated woman.

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He is a muralist whose art has crossed borders throughout the U.S. and Latin America.

“Every stage of my life has played a puzzle piece to form who I am as an artist. Every part of my life is an influence,” Preuss said.

Raised in Miami by an Argentine mother and a Spanish father, Preuss says he finds his inspiration from skateboarding to neo-classical art lending to his unique style.

After graduating from high school, Preuss lived in New York for three years while studying art at the School of Visual Arts.

He returned to South Florida after requesting a medical leave from school in order to undergo surgery. Throughout his surgery, Preuss says he continued to work in art, making connections that eventually landed him in front of some of the biggest names in entertainment and hospitality in the city.

The first stroke of luck for the young artist came when the Basement nightclub inside the the Miami Beach Edition Hotel asked him to paint a mural from wall-to-wall.

Before long, he was painting a mural for Magnus Talent Agency, co-founded by Marc Anthony.

The man. New deal alert

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And the mural blended the talent agency along with some of Miami’s entertainment history.

His art can caught the attention of businesses in Latin America wanting a piece of his colorful murals.

Some last close ups of my new piece “Favela Christ” 2018. Mixed media. 4ft x 4ft I’ve always been fascinated with favelas and the unregulated ingenuity and creativity that goes in to the creation and maintenance of these societies. Almost everything in these vast and unique towns is make shift and constructed by the people who reside in them. This inspired me to make a piece depicting the favelas in which every building was painted with a different material. I placed the famous Christ the Redeemer landmark in the middle, because these diverse, colorful, seemingly impossible Favelas get swept under the rug when it comes to government funding and public attention. Check my last post to see the entire time lapse process. #favela #brazil #christ #mixedmedia #artistsoninstagram #art #gallery #timelapse #illustration #contemporaryart #surrealism #popsurrealism #hifructosemag #juxtapozmagazine #painting #paintingoftheday #rio #christtheredeemer #jesus #fineart #originalart #artfido #artshow #modernart #mixedmediaart #artcollector #artreception #artfair #beautiful #artlovers

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Preuss is getting ready to go to Brazil to lend his talents to a hotel looking for murals capturing the vibrance of the favelas. As Preuss mentions in his Instagram caption, he has long been inspired by the favelas and the people who live in them. The creativity and ingenuity of the people is something he admires.

Preuss already has experience bringing the joy of art to impoverished communities in Latin America.

He has traveled through Latin America. Recently, he traveled with his mother, a yoga instructor, back to Argentina. While there, he volunteered his time to paint murals with children at schools.

One of his goals is to continue pursuing his art and using the profits for global art education.

“I want to be able to make money to go to these places to make art with the locals,” Preuss says. “I want to have the world be my child.”


READ: This Art Project Is Traveling To Every U.S.-Mexico Border Crossing And Documenting The Experience Of Daily Commuters

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These 15 Latinx Artists Need To Be On All Of Your Playlists Now More Than Ever

Entertainment

These 15 Latinx Artists Need To Be On All Of Your Playlists Now More Than Ever

@iamcardib / Instagram

So many of us grew up listening to iconic Latinx artists, Celia Cruz, Marc Anthony, and Selena… along with Smashmouth, Eminem, and Britney Spears. So needless to say, our generation has the absolute best taste in music.

Of course, there are some artists from juventud that are still creating bomb music, but you should never sleep on new talent. Here’s our list of who you should be listening to today:

1. Santana

Credit: Super Bowl. Digital Image. Popsugar. February 15, 2017.

Santana, you own my heart and my childhood. He has his own classics, but lately, he’s been doing a lot of collabs.

Listen to “Safari” with Guero Sosa and his 2017 album, “Power of Peace” with The Isley Brothers.

2. Bruno Mars

Credit: Finesse. Digital Image. Vulture. January 4, 2018.

Yes, Bruno Mars is an entity of his own but this collab with Cardi B is everything. It’s as ’90’s throwback as it looks and if you haven’t listened to it yet (?!), please pause. Listen. And find more Latino rappers for the next two slides.

3. Princess Nokia

Credit: Instagram @princessnokia

She’s Afro-Puerto Rican and identifies como una bruja and a queer feminist. Oh and she’s a crazy talented rapper. Um, plus, she straight up threw a cup of hot soup on a racist and then slapped him while on the train. In her own words, “And yes I threw hot soup in this mans face and kicked him off off the train, and kicked [him] in the face. Any other racists wanna try us again?” Just support her, k?

Listen to “Brujas” and “Tomboy.”

4. Maluca

Credit: Instagram @malucamala

Oh hey, look another Latina feminist! Yeah, she’s crushing the patriarchy with her words. You’ve got to listen to this Dominican rapper now.

Listen to “Mala” and “El Tigeraso.”

5. Becky G

Credit: Instagram @iambeckyg

You know her. She’s the Mexican queen of pop, today, who delivers both English and Spanish versions of her fans’ faves. The Inglewood native is also challenging the sexist double standard of what men and women can and can’t sing. Listen to her latest release, “Ya Es Hora.”

6. Jessie Reyez

Credit: Instagram @jessiereyez

Reyez is Colombian-Canadian and best known for “Figures,” which is the song you need to listen to if you’re going through a breakup. Check out the remix with Daniel Caesar she just released this weekend!

7. Ibeyi

Credit: Instagram @ibeyi2

If you could see her face, you might recognize 22-year-old twin sisters, Lisa Kaindé Diaz and Naomi Diaz from Beyonce’s “Lemonade.” Their music is bomb AF. Seriously, they know how to drop a beat and is deeply rooted in their Afro-Cuban roots.

Listen to “River.” Bey’s a fan.

8. Camila Cabello

Credit: Instagram @camila_cabello

This goes without saying: Camila is our Cuban-Mexican heartthrob and I’m holding back from making this entire slideshow be about her.

Listen to “Havana Latin Remix” and “She Loves Control” and literally everything else.

9. Selena Gomez

Credit: Instagram @selenagomez

She’s named after the Selena and is Mexican-Italian. She’s been suffering from lupus, a gnarly auto-immune disease, and she’s been outspoken about her mental health. Also, she’s on a break with Bieber. Also, she’s talented AF.

10. Calma Carmona

Credit: Instagram @calmacarmona

Here comes the more chill música. Calma’s the Afro-Puerto Rican soulful trance goddess we need to recover from the day. Her music is bliss with a beat.

Listen to “100 Vidas” and “When I Was Your Girl.”

11. Carla Morrison

Credit: Instagram @carlitamorrison

This Mexican beauty sings soulful, gorgeous ballads and her presence on stage are ethereal for real. I’m obsessed with her and pretty soon, you will be too. 🙂

Listen to “Duele” and “Eres Tú” and try not to think about your ex.

12. Claudia Prieto

Credit: Instagram @claudiaprieto77

Ok, so she only has this one song that we found on the Spotify playlist, “Extranjera” but I’m obsessed. Think feel-good, chill vibes and support female artists.

13. Alex Cuba

Credit: Instagram @iamalexcuba

I first heard Alex Cuba open a set back in 2015 and he’s since released the solid Caribbean, Cuban music that you just need to sing along with.

Listen to “Por Donde Vas” and “Agua de Pozo.”

14. Shakira

Credit: Instagram @shakira

Shakira is a Colombian icon and while we know her from the 2000’s “Hips Don’t Lie”, she’s been producing music since she was in school.

Listen to her latest album “El Dorado,” especially the song “Me Enamoré.”

15. Cardi B.

Credit: Instagram @iamcardib

As if we even need to tell you to listen to Cardi B. This Trinidadian-Dominican, Bronx-er just dropped a new single over the weekend and it is the sexiest, sweetest way to rap to your boo’ to watch himself. Plus, she just glammed up her Bartier Cardi music video five seconds ago. Get on it!

J.Lo Speaks Up About The Super Bowl Halftime Show And How She Wants Girls To Raise Their Voices

Entertainment

J.Lo Speaks Up About The Super Bowl Halftime Show And How She Wants Girls To Raise Their Voices

jlo / shakira / Instagram

The J.Lo and Shakira halftime show at Super Bowl LIV was electric, powerful, empowering, and contagious. The two Latina performers gave Super Bowl viewers and audience the show of a lifetime. Latin pride was at the forefront of this year’s halftime show and there was also a strong political message because Latinos live in terrifying times.

J.Lo and Shakira used part of their halftime show to give a voice to the voiceless in the Latino and immigrant communities.

During J.Lo’s performance, her daughter Emme started “Let’s Get Loud” and the imagery struck a nerve with some viewers. Litter in front of the stage were children in orbed cages. Many have speculated that the children are a nod at the Trump administration’s immigration policies that forced children into cages and separated families.

The mother and daughter duo then covered “Born In The USA” by Bruce Springsteen and J.Lo flashed a Puerto Rican flag.

The Puerto Rican people, who are Americans, have been let down by the current administration as they try to recover from Hurricane Maria. Now, the island is recovering from devastating earthquakes. The Trump administration has actively cut funding to Medicaid in Puerto Rico as more and more people are reliant on the assistance.

J.Lo shared a video on Instagram right before the performance and included a rallying call to all Latinas and young girls around the world.

The global pop star wanted to use her performance at Super Bowl LIV performance to give people a chance to raise their voices. In a time where children are in cages, women are losing healthcare rights, and vulnerable communities are under attack around the world, these moments matter.

The Super Bowl LIV halftime show’s message is resonating far and wide.

The image of Emme “locked” in a cage while singing “Let’s Get Loud” caught everyone’s attention. Her voice, accompanied by a choir of children behind her, gave viewers a striking visual of children in cages.

Some pointed to other elements of the performance that referenced the administration’s treatment of migrants.

Credit: @HelloOElaine / Twitter

There were so many elements of the half time show that people pointed to as reminiscent of the policies devastating migrant families. The lights behind the performers interlocked in the pattern of a chainlink fence we have all seen along the border.

Some people were very much bothered by the strong Latino representation at the Super Bowl.

Pobercitos. Who knew that strong Latinas on stage showing their brown bodies and Latin dancing would trigger them?

Some people are showing the double standard that exists among performers at the Super Bowl.

Women, especially Black and brown women, are often treated to this double standard. Somehow, dancing as a brown or Black woman is overly sexual when white men are not subjected to the same scrutiny.

To top it off, let’s not forget that the Super Bowl was in Miami, a Latino enclave and the halftime performance was representative of that culture.

Credit: @ExtraLars / Twitter

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