Things That Matter

Mexico Conducts Largest Raid On Migrant Caravan Members, Regrets It

Mexican authorities detained over 360 people this week in the largest single raid on a migrant caravan since the groups began passing through Mexico last year. The migrant group was making their way through the southern state of Chiapas with hopes of reaching the U.S. border. Police targeted isolated groups at the end of a caravan that had close to 3,000 migrants. While the number of migrants detained is alarming, similar arrests have occurred over the last month as support for the caravans in Mexico has waned recently.

Many migrants ran to the safest place they could find, the local Roman Catholic church.

The caravan was broken up as people fled to avoid being detained. There have been multiple reports of mothers and children running from police and hiding in nearby forests to avoid authorities. Images on social media have shown authorities wrestling migrants into police vehicles as families tried to stay together during the raid.

“There are people still lost up in the woods. The woods are very dangerous,” Arturo Hernández, a sinewy 59-year-old farmer from Comayagua, Honduras, who fled through the woods with his grandson told Fox News. “They waited until we were resting and fell upon us, grabbing children and women.”

Those migrants who were detained were sent to an immigration station in the nearby city of Tapachula. As this time it’s was not clear whether they would be deported back to their country of origin.

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has spoken up about the raid and the increasing number of migrant caravans.

Credit:@srbija_eu/Twitter

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador spoke about the raid on Tuesday morning, acknowledging that the caravans can’t simply go wherever they please. He noted concerns about human traffickers that may have allegedly infiltrated various caravans.

“We don’t want for them to just have free passage, not just out of legal concerns but for questions of safety.” López Obrador said at a press conference.

Tonatiuh Guillén, Obrador’s immigration chief, said that the raid was “regrettable,” especially for scaring migrant children. Guillén says he doesn’t want to see the incident happen again but warns it’s a normal “migration enforcement action.”

Mexico has deported 11,800 migrants so far this month. The country is also being more selective when it comes to those who receive a humanitarian visa, which would allow a migrant to remain in the country and work.

This has all happened as another “giant” caravan, that may have 10,000 migrants in it, heads towards the U.S.-border.

According to the Washington Examiner, a new caravan of approximately 10,000 migrants is traveling through Mexico with plans of reaching the U.S-border by this week. The group is being called the “mother of all caravans” by Mexico’s Interior Secretary Olga Sanchez Cordero. Mexico officials are preparing for the large group by ensuring they have food, shelter, and other needs.

While President Trump has called has ramped up pressure on Mexico to do more to stem the flow of Central American migration, Mexico has already deported thousands of migrants this year. It has also done its part to help those in Mexico as the country has issued more than 15,000 humanitarian visas.

Making matters worse for migrants is the lack of support from locals in southern cities near the U.S-border. Many have faced violent conditions on their journeys and subsequently while they wait for asylum claims to be processed. This has led to an increase in migrant camps near border cities that have continually grown over the last year.

READ: Trump Administration Plans To Build More Tent Cities To Hold Migrants Indefinitely

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

Things That Matter

Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

When it comes to international happiness rankings, Mexico has long done well in many measurements. In fact, in 2019, Mexico placed number 23 beating out every other Latin American country except for Costa Rica. But in 2020, things looks a lot different as the country slipped 23 spots on the list. What does this mean for Mexico and its residents? 

Mexico slips 23 spots on the World Happiness Report thanks to a variety of compelling factors.

Mexico plummeted 23 places to the 46th happiest nation in the world, according to the 2020 happiness rankings in the latest edition of the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The coronavirus pandemic had a significant impact on Mexicans’ happiness in 2020, the new report indicates.

“Covid-19 has shaken, taken, and reshaped lives everywhere,” the report noted, and that is especially true in Mexico, where almost 200,000 people have lost their lives to the disease and millions lost their jobs last year as the economy recorded its worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Based on results of the Gallup World Poll as well as an analysis of data related to the happiness impacts of Covid-19, Mexico’s score on the World Happiness Report index was 5.96, an 8% slump compared to its average score between 2017 and 2019 when its average ranking was 23rd.

The only nations that dropped more than Mexico – the worst country to be in during the pandemic, according to an analysis by the Bloomberg news agency – were El Salvador, the Philippines and Benin.

Mexico has struggled especially hard against the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the pandemic started, Mexico has fared far worse than many other countries across Latin America. Today, there are reports that Mexico has been undercounting and underreporting both the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths. Given this reality, the country is 2nd worst in the world when it comes to number of suspected deaths, with more than 200,000 people dead. 

Could the happiness level have an impact on this year’s elections?

Given that Mexico’s decline in the rankings appears related to the severity of the coronavirus pandemic here, one might assume that the popularity of the federal government – which has been widely condemned for its management of the crisis from both a health and economic perspective – would take a hit.

But a poll published earlier this month found that 55.9% of respondents approved of President López Obrador’s management of the pandemic and 44% indicated that they would vote for the ruling Morena party if the election for federal deputies were held the day they were polled.

Support for Morena, which apparently got a shot in the arm from the national vaccination program even as it proceeded slowly, was more than four times higher than that for the two main opposition parties, the PAN and the PRI.

Still, Mexico’s slide in the happiness rankings could give López Obrador – who has claimed that ordinary Mexicans are happier with him in office – pause for thought.

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Mexico Is Owning The Instagram-Worthy World Of Glamping With These Bubble Hotels

Culture

Mexico Is Owning The Instagram-Worthy World Of Glamping With These Bubble Hotels

Right now just about everyone is itching to go on vacation. But considering that we’re still mid-pandemic and the call remains to socially distance, what can one do?

Sure, glamping is nothing new – it’s filled our Instagram feeds for years and was around long before that – but it may just provide travelers with that socially-distanced staycation that so many of us need right about now. Or, better yet, wait a little while longer and get yourself to Mexico where several new glamping bubble hotels are popping up.

Mexico will soon have three “bubble hotel” options for tourists looking for the next level of “glamping.”

When you think of camping, many of us think of bugs, not showering, and doing our private business behind a bush somewhere. While that’s still definitely an option for those of us that are into it, glamping has been a trend towards making the camping experience a more comfortable one.

Glamping has been gaining popularity among nature lovers, who also want to enjoy those everyday creature comforts, but in the midst of beautiful landscapes. That’s why bubble hotels have been popping up across Mexico, to offer clients a unique stay, close to nature they’re the perfect ‘getaway’ to get out of your daily routine.

From the bosque outside Mexico City to the deserts of Baja, Mexico is a glamping paradise. 

These bubble hotels have rooms described by travel guidebook publisher Lonely Planet as essentially inflatable, transparent domes designed to allow guests to cocoon themselves in nature without quite leaving their material comforts behind. 

There are already two such properties across Mexico with a third which will begin welcoming guests sometime toward the end of this year.

One of those that is already operational is Alpino Bubble Glamping in Mexico City while the other is the Campera Bubble Hotel in the Valle de Guadalupe wine region of Baja California.

Located in the Cumbres de Ajusco National Park in the south of the capital, the former has just two “bubbles,” a 40-square-meter deluxe one that goes for 4,500 pesos (about US $220) a night and a 25-square-meter standard where a stay costs a slightly more affordable 4,000 pesos.

Both have views of the Pico del Águila, the highest point of the Ajusco, or Xitle, volcano, and come equipped with telescopes that guests can use to get a better view of the surrounding scenery and night sky.

Bubble glamping isn’t the camping our parents dragged us out to do in the woods as kids.

Credit: Alpino Bubble Hotel

Sure you may be connecting with nature and enjoying awesome activities like horseback riding, stargazing, hiking or rafting, but these properties come with all the creature comforts we’re used to. 

Move nights, wifi, breakfast in bed, warm showers, luxurious bedding, and even a full bar are all standard amenities at many of these properties.

What do you think? Would you be up to stay the night at one of these bubble hotels?

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