Things That Matter

Mexico Grants Bolivia’s Former President Asylum Allowing Him To Flee Growing Unrest

Latin America is in chaos. People are protesting in Chile over the economic disparity between classes. Colombians are also fighting for their demand for a fair educational system. Mexico’s violence is surging once again after Mexico’s new government has taken over. The Amazon rainforest is still on fire, and Brazil’s president refuses to acknowledge the environmental ramifications. Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela’s president, is still in office despite his people demanding otherwise. Now we can add Bolivia to that list

On Monday, Evo Morales resigned as president of Bolivia after the public renounced the presidential elections there in October. 

Credit: @ajplus / Twitter

Back in October, Morales ran against former President Carlos Mesa (he was president of Bolivia between 2003 and 2005). Morales had been Bolivia’s leader since 2006, but it looks as if perhaps the people had enough of his presidency. During the elections last month, CNN reports that Morales won by a small margin

So a recount was in order. However, 24 hours after the counting had begun, Morales ordered to end it and declared himself president. The fact that Morales said he had won himself wasn’t that farfetched, because he sort of did that in the past. 

Jim Shultz, Founder and Executive Director of the Democracy Center, who’s lived in Bolivia and understands the situation there, wrote, “One was what seemed like Morales’ desire to serve as President for Life. When his political party, MAS, wrote a new constitution in 2009, they lifted the long-standing one-term limit on presidents and paved the way for Evo to run for a second term. In 2014 he broke a long-standing pledge not to seek a third term, claiming that his first term didn’t count because it was served under the old constitution. He won once more.”

The election results, and Morales handling of it, resulted in massive protests and violence. 

Credit: @evagolinger / Twitter

“Bolivians are upset over fraud, and we will not be silent in the face of injustice,” 26-year-old Diego Tamayo, a student at a university, told the New York Times. “Never in my life have I seen a mobilization of this scale.”

The mobilization seemed to work. Bolivian Armed Forces, Commander Williams Kaliman, told Morales to step down, and he did. 

Morales tweeted, “I denounce to the world and the Bolivian people that a police officer publicly announced that he is instructed to execute an illegal arrest warrant against me; likewise, violent groups assaulted my home. A coup destroys the rule of law.” He added, “After looting and trying to set fire to my house in Villa Victoria, vandalism groups of the Mesa and Camacho coup docked my home in the Magisterio neighborhood of Cochabamba. I am very grateful to my neighbors, who stopped those raids. A coup destroys peace.”

Now Mexico has opened the doors to the former leader where he has sought asylum. 

He said this is where he spent his first night as the former president of Bolivia. 

Credit: @evoespueblo / Twitter

“This was my first night after leaving the presidency, forced by the coup of Mesa and Camacho with the help of the Police. There I remembered my times as a leader. Very grateful to my brothers from the federations of the Tropic of Cochabamba for providing security and care.”

Now that he is in the hands of the Mexican government, Morales doesn’t seem all that upset about getting ousted.

Credit: @evoespueblo / Twitter

Morales tweeted, “Very grateful to brother Manuel López Obrador and the government and people of Mexico for saving my life. We arrived safe and sound with our brothers Álvaro and Gabriela. The coup plotters offered $ 50,000 to a security member to deliver me before my resignation.” 

Wow, sounds kind of dramatic, almost like it could be a movie or series on TV. Weirdly enough, the Bolivia drama sounds just like season two of “Jack Ryan.” We won’t spoil it for you if you haven’t seen it. Just know that it’s about a Venezuelan president that will go to great lengths to not lose his presidency. It sounds like real life to us. Speaking of Venezuelan president, Maduro was not pleased at all about Morales getting ousted. He also blamed President Donald Trump. 

“There went Donald Trump to applaud and celebrate what he thinks is his victory … the look on Donald Trump’s face was one of vengeance, of hatred, and he gave the order to overthrow and finish off the Indian,” Maduro said, according to Asi Somos

But now the real work begins. Who will lead Bolivia now?

READ: Bolivia’s President Wants To Be Reelected For A Fourth Time But He Could Send His Country Into A Political Crisis

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This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

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This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Look out Bad Bunny. There’s another breed of bunny in town that’s taking the internet by storm. A college student in Mexico recently went viral for the oddest thing. He has genetically engineered a strain of rabbits to be the largest in the world.

21-year-old Kiro Yakin has become a viral sensation after internet users have seen him with pictures of the giant bunnies he genetically engineered.

Yakin, a student at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla on the Xicotepec campus, is studying veterinary and animal husbandry. He began his experimentation by breeding two unique rabbit types together. The Flemish Giant rabbit and other, longer-eared bunnies that Yakin happened to notice. As a result, his monster-bunny was born.

According to Yakin, his experimental bunnies grow up to 22 pounds  Flemish Giant, while the average Flemish giant weighs 15 pounds. But make no mistake, Yakin’s bunny experiment was no accident. “It takes an average of 3 to 4 years to reproduce this giant species,” he told Sintesis.

Yakin’s ultimate goal is to breed a rabbit that can grow up to 30 pounds. “I am currently studying genetics to see how to grow this breed of giant rabbits more,” he said.

Yakin, who has had a soft spot for rabbits since he was a child (pun intended), now cares for a whopping fifty giant rabbits out of his parents’ home.

Luckily, his parents are supportive enough of his dream that they support their son (and his bunnies) financially. “I have the financial support and support of my parents to buy food a week for all 50 giant rabbits,” Yakin told Sintesis.

But he also admitted his project has a long way to go. “So far I have not set aside the time or budget that is required to start the project more seriously,” he said.

The only thing that’s preventing Yakin from committing all his time and energy to creating even bigger bunnies is–what else?–money.

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Although he already submitted a proposal to his university to try and expand his research, as of now, he is self-financed. However, Yakin makes a bit of extra cash by selling the giant bunnies to private customers.

His ultimate goal though, is to open up a large, professional farm where he can breed and cross-breed his bunnies to his heart’s content.

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Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

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Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

The United States is one of the world’s most successful countries when it comes to rolling out the COVID-19 vaccine program. So far, more than 200 million vaccines have been administered across the U.S. and as of this week anyone over the age of 16 is now eligible.

Meanwhile, in many countries around the world – including Mexico – the vaccine roll out is still highly restricted. For many, who can afford to travel, they see the best option at a shot in the arm to take a trip to the U.S. where many locations are reporting a surplus in vaccines.

Wealthy Latin Americans travel to U.S. to get COVID vaccines.

People of means from Latin America are chartering planes, booking commercial flights, buying bus tickets and renting cars to get the vaccine in the United States due to lack of supply back in their home countries. Some of those making the trip include politicians, TV personalities, business executives and a soccer team.

There is an old Mexican joke: God tells a Mexican he has only a week left to live but can ask for one final wish, no matter how outrageous. So the Mexican asks for a ticket to Houston—for a second opinion.

Virginia Gónzalez and her husband flew from Mexico to Texas and then boarded a bus to a vaccination site. They made the trip again for a second dose. The couple from Monterrey, Mexico, acted on the advice of the doctor treating the husband for prostate cancer. In all, they logged 1,400 miles for two round trips.

“It’s a matter of survival,” Gónzalez told NBC News, of getting a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. “In Mexico, officials didn’t buy enough vaccines. It’s like they don’t care about their citizens.”

Mexico has a vaccine rollout plan but it’s been too slow in many people’s opinions.

With a population of nearly 130 million people, Mexico has secured more vaccines than many Latin American nations — about 18 million doses as of Monday from the U.S., China, Russia and India. Most of those have been given to health care workers, people over 60 and some teachers, who so far are the only ones eligible. Most other Latin American countries, except for Chile, are in the same situation or worse.

So vaccine seekers who can afford to travel are coming to the United States to avoid the long wait, including people from as far as Paraguay. Those who make the trip must obtain a tourist visa and have enough money to pay for required coronavirus tests, plane tickets, hotel rooms, rental cars and other expenses.

There is little that is fair about the global race for the COVID-19 vaccine, despite international attempts to avoid the current disparities. In Israel, a country of 9 million people, half of the population has received at least one dose, while plenty of countries have yet to receive any. While the U.S. could vaccinate 70 percent of its population by September 2021 at the current rollout rate, it could take Mexico until approximately the year 2024 to achieve the same results.

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