Things That Matter

New Research Shows Most Undocumented Immigrants Aren’t Coming From Mexico But Instead Central America

Mexicans no longer make up the overall majority of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States. According to a new study by the Pew Research Center, the number of Mexicans leaving the U.S. is more than there are coming here which is a significant change from the early 2000s. These new numbers show the changing landscape of immigration in the U.S. within the last decade where there are fewer immigrants arriving. This trend shows those who have been in the U.S. for longer are now by far the majority of immigrants as a whole.

The immigrant population in the U.S., which has its smallest unauthorized immigrant population in more than a decade, is shifting quickly.

Credit: Pew Research Center

Since 2010, migration from Mexico into the U.S. has been slowly decreasing as data shows more Mexicans have moved south across the border than the north. According to the Pew Research Center, between 2007 and 2017, about two million of the Mexican immigrants who left the U.S. had been living in the country undocumented, 6.9 to 4.9 respectively.

This shift has contributed to an overall decline in the undocumented immigrant population which has gone down from a peak of 12.2 million in 2007 to a low of 10.5 million in 2017.

There has also been an uptick in the length of time most undocumented immigrants have been in the county. The typical undocumented immigrant had lived 15 years in the United States in 2017, which is up from seven years in 1995. It’s the highest number of years since Pew started tracking that data.

While the number of immigrants from Mexico has gone down, Central Americans are coming at unprecedented rates.

Credit: Pew Research Center

There’s been a surge of migrants from Central American countries, like Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras that have arrived in the U.S. within the last few years. From 1.5 million in 2007 to 1.9 million in 2017, Central Americans represent one of the biggest increases in the overall immigrant population.

Though many Central Americans are crossing the border illegally, they’re requesting asylum, which means a much longer process and stay for many.
Even with the recent surge of families from Central America seeking asylum at the southern border, apprehensions remain far below the peak number of about 1.6 million in 2000.

Research has also found that long term residents outnumber more recent arrivals. Undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. have become more settled into their communities. In 2010, about 50 percent of the nation’s undocumented immigrants had lived in the country for more than 10 years. In 2017, that number rose to 66 percent.

Following Central America, the immigrant population of people from Asia has also risen to 1.4 million. The share of both legal and unauthorized immigrants from Asian nations has also continued to spike.

What do these numbers mean in terms of tracking and foreseeing future immigration trends moving forward?

Credit: Pew Research Center

The latest data is a reflection of the various global and domestic changes that have made noticeable differences in immigration trends. Several factors include the U.S government investing more heavily in border security which had made illegal border crossings harder. In 1994, the U.S. had fewer than 5,000 Border Patrol agents but today that number is nearly 20,000. Stopping the rising inflow of unauthorized immigrants has been one of the key issues for the Trump administration.

The Mexican economy has also improved, resulting in more Mexicans to stay in their country and more Mexicans living in the U.S. to return back. Many of the migration trends that were seen in the last 20 years have changed and Mexicans are one of those changing demographics.

Data shows that the second wave of illegal immigration isn’t coming from those in other countries but rather those already here overstaying visas.
More than 600,000 foreign travelers who legally entered the U.S in 2017 overstayed their visas and remained here by the end of the year, according to recent Department of Homeland Security data.

“The decline in unauthorized immigrants from Mexico and rise from other parts of the world is one sign of a change in how recent arrivals to this population enter the country,” the researchers wrote. “A growing share of U.S. unauthorized immigrants do not cross the border illegally, but probably arrive with legal visas and overstay their required departure date.”

READ: Ahead Of Supreme Court Decision, Census Bureau Quietly Seeks Citizenship Data

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This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

Things That Matter

This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Look out Bad Bunny. There’s another breed of bunny in town that’s taking the internet by storm. A college student in Mexico recently went viral for the oddest thing. He has genetically engineered a strain of rabbits to be the largest in the world.

21-year-old Kiro Yakin has become a viral sensation after internet users have seen him with pictures of the giant bunnies he genetically engineered.

Yakin, a student at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla on the Xicotepec campus, is studying veterinary and animal husbandry. He began his experimentation by breeding two unique rabbit types together. The Flemish Giant rabbit and other, longer-eared bunnies that Yakin happened to notice. As a result, his monster-bunny was born.

According to Yakin, his experimental bunnies grow up to 22 pounds  Flemish Giant, while the average Flemish giant weighs 15 pounds. But make no mistake, Yakin’s bunny experiment was no accident. “It takes an average of 3 to 4 years to reproduce this giant species,” he told Sintesis.

Yakin’s ultimate goal is to breed a rabbit that can grow up to 30 pounds. “I am currently studying genetics to see how to grow this breed of giant rabbits more,” he said.

Yakin, who has had a soft spot for rabbits since he was a child (pun intended), now cares for a whopping fifty giant rabbits out of his parents’ home.

Luckily, his parents are supportive enough of his dream that they support their son (and his bunnies) financially. “I have the financial support and support of my parents to buy food a week for all 50 giant rabbits,” Yakin told Sintesis.

But he also admitted his project has a long way to go. “So far I have not set aside the time or budget that is required to start the project more seriously,” he said.

The only thing that’s preventing Yakin from committing all his time and energy to creating even bigger bunnies is–what else?–money.

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Although he already submitted a proposal to his university to try and expand his research, as of now, he is self-financed. However, Yakin makes a bit of extra cash by selling the giant bunnies to private customers.

His ultimate goal though, is to open up a large, professional farm where he can breed and cross-breed his bunnies to his heart’s content.

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A Group of Volunteer ‘Fairy Godmothers’ Threw a Lavish Quinceañera For This Homeless Teen Girl

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A Group of Volunteer ‘Fairy Godmothers’ Threw a Lavish Quinceañera For This Homeless Teen Girl

Photo via Getty Images

For most Latinas, having a quinceañera is a right-of-passage. Your quinceañera is the official milestone that proves you’re finally a woman. It’s a party that you look forward to your entire childhood. It’s that one time in your life that you, and only you, get to feel like a princess.

Unfortunately, not every girl has the luxury of having a quinceañera. Some girls’ families don’t have the finances to throw a huge party.

In Miami, a group of “fairy godmothers” organized a quinceañera for a homeless teen girl whose family recently emigrated from Mexico.

The girl, Adriana Palma, had moved with her family from Mexico to Miami in early 2020. But because of the pandemic, her father lost his job. Adriana, her parents, and her three younger brothers spent the next four months living in their SUV.

Relocating to another country is hard enough, but Adriana faced another challenge by being homeless, struggling to learn English, and chasing down random Wi-Fi signals in order to complete her homework assignments. It was a struggle, to say the least.

And to make matters worse, Adriana’s fifteenth birthday was coming up. Adrian’s parents told her that, since they were homeless, they wouldn’t be able to throw her a quinceañera. “We will be together as a family,” her mother, Itzel Palma, told her. “That will be my gift to you.”

Luckily, the Palma family had a group of guardian angels watching out for them. Being homeless wouldn’t prevent Adriana from having a quinceañera.

A charity called Miami Rescue Mission had already hooked up the Palmas with a small apartment for the family to get back on their feet. “Cover Girls”, a subgroup of the Miami Rescue Mission, dedicate their time to help women and children who are in tough circumstances.

When Lian Navarro, leader of the Cover Girls, found out about Adriana’s situation, she knew she had to help. Cuban-Amercian herself, Navarro knew how important quinceañeras are to young Latinas. She called up her group of volunteers and they got to work making Adriana’s dream come true.

The 60 “fairy godmothers” decided to throw Adriana the quinceañera of her dreams in a local Miami church. They settled on a theme: Paris.

The volunteers decorated the bare church in gold Eiffel towers, supplied pink macarons and French pastries, they topped off each table with a floral centerpiece. They gifted Adriana with every item on her wish list. Not to mention, Adriana was able to be dressed up in a frilly pink quinceañera dress. Her hair and makeup were professionally done. A professional photographer captured her special day.

“We want them to have these memories,” said Cover Girl volunteer, Tadia Silva, about children and teens who grow up homeless. “They have to believe they are worth all that because they are.”

After her beautiful quinceañera, Adriana appeared to know her true worth. At the end of the party, she gave her “fairy godmothers” personalized notes of thanks. “I felt like a princess,” she said.

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